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Tagged with “book:author=cory doctorow” (52)

  1. Cory Doctorow on losing the open Web

    The O’Reilly Hardware Podcast: Digital rights management goes deeper into the Web.In this episode of the Hardware podcast, we talk with writer and digital rights activist Cory Doctorow. He’s recently rejoined the Electronic Frontier Foundation to fight a World Wide Web Consortium proposal that would add DRM to the core specification for HTML. When we recorded this episode with Cory, the W3C had just overruled the EFF’s objection. The result, he says, is that “we are locking innovation out of the Web.”“It is illegal to report security vulnerabilities in a DRM,” Doctorow says. “[DRM] is making it illegal to tell people when the devices they depend upon for their very lives are unsuited for that purpose.”

    In our “Tools” segment, Doctorow tells us about tools that can be used for privacy and encryption, including the EFF surveillance self-defense kit, and Wickr, an encrypted messaging service that allows for an expiration date on shared messages and photos. “We need a tool that’s so easy your boss can use it,” he says.

    Other links:

    In 2014, Nest bought Revolv, maker of a smart home hub. Now Nest is shutting down Revolv’s cloud service, and in the process it’s bricking every Revolv hub that’s already been sold. Consumers may own their hardware, but if it depends on cloud software to run, it operates at someone else’s whim.

    Mark Klein, an AT&T technician who filed a whistleblower suit against AT&T for allowing the National Security Administration to tap into its lines.

    EFF’s Apollo 1201 project, aimed at eradicating DRM

    Simply Secure, a non-profit privacy and security organization of which Doctorow has recently joined the board

    DanKam, an augmented-reality application written by security researcher Dan Kaminsky that helps people who experience colorblindness. It’s an example of a legitimate project that requires the ability to break DRM.

    This week’s click spirals:

    David Cranor: The war among players in the online game Eve Online, including a recent economic insurrection by some players against the game runners.

    Jon Bruner: A game design competition based on Robert Caro’s classic biography The Power Broker: Robert Moses and the Fall of New York, about the legendary urban planner.

    https://www.oreilly.com/ideas/cory-doctorow-on-losing-the-open-web

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  2. Authors@Google: Cory Doctorow & Charles Stross | “The Rapture of Nerds”

    Cory Doctorow and Charles Stross have just signed with Tor Books to co-author a fix-up novel based on a series of short stories called Rapture of the Nerds. The authors and their editor told us what to expect:

    Cory and Charlie intend to write a third novella in the sequence begun with "Jury Service" and "Appeals Court," and THE RAPTURE OF THE NERDS will consist of all three novellas, possibly with some small additional connective tissue if necessary.

    Many distinguished SF "novels" have actually been stitched together from short-fiction serieses like this; the venerable industry term for such a book is "fix-up", which doesn’t imply anything deprecatory.

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    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=viisMOc1iic
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/

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  3. Cory Doctorow: Podcast: Why it is not possible to regulate robots…

    Here’s a reading (MP3) of a my recent Guardian column, Why it is not possible to regulate robots, which discusses where and how robots can be regulated, and whether there is any sensible ground for “robot law” as distinct from “computer law.”

    http://mostlysignssomeportents.tumblr.com/post/119112072177/podcast-why-it-is-not-possible-to-regulate-robots

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  4. re:publica 2015 - Cory Doctorow: The NSA are not the Stasi: Godwin for mass surveillance

    Find out more at: http://re-publica.de/session/nsa-are-not-stasi-godwin-mass-surveillance

    It’s tempting to compare NSA mass surveillance to the GDR’s notorious Stasi, but the differences are more illuminating than the similarities.

    Cory Doctorow Electronic Frontier Foundation

    Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Germany (CC BY-SA 3.0 DE)

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    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l8Q0Mme33bM
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/

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  5. Cory Doctorow, “Information Doesn’t Want to be Free” – The Command Line

    This is an episode of The Command Line Podcast.

    In this episode, I interview Cory Doctorow about his latest book, “Information Doesn’t Want to be Free: Laws for the Internet Age.” If you are interested in learning more about the topics we discuss and that book covers, you can also check out books by the scholars we mention: Lawrence Lessig, James Boyle and William Patry. I compared Cory’s book to “The Indie Band Survival Guide” the authors of which are friends of the show whom I have also interviewed.

    The audiobook version of the book is already available. Check Cory’s site, the free download and electronic editions should be available soon.

    http://thecommandline.net/2014/12/13/info_doesnt_want/

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  6. Picking The Locks: Redefining Copyright Law In The Digital Age : NPR

    In his new book, Cory Doctorow shows creators how to survive in the digital age. He says the problem with copyright law is tech platforms have more control over content than the people who make it.

    http://www.npr.org/2014/11/03/360196476/picking-the-locks-redefining-copyright-law-in-the-digital-age

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  7. News from the future for Wired UK

    Here’s a reading of a short story I wrote for the July, 2014 issue of Wired UK in the form of a news dispatch from the year 2024 — specifically, a parliamentary sketch from a raucous Prime Minister’s Question Time where a desperate issue of computer security rears its head:

    Quick: what do all of these have in common: your gran’s cochlear implant, the Whatsapp stack, the Zipcar by your flat, the Co-Op’s 3D printing kiosk, a Boots dispensary, your Virgin thermostat, a set of Tata artificial legs, and cheap heads-up goggles that come free with a Mister Men game?

    If you’re stumped, you’re not alone. But Prime Minister Lane Fox had no trouble drawing a line around them today during PMQs in a moment that blindsided the Lab-Con coalition leader Jon Cruddas, who’d asked about the Princess Sophia hacking affair. Seasoned Whitehall watchers might reasonably have expected the PM to be defensive, after a group of still-anonymous hackers captured video, audio and sensitive personal communications by hijacking the Princess’s home network. The fingerpointing from GCHQ and MI6 has been good for headlines, and no one would have been surprised to hear the PM give the security services a bollocking, in Westminster’s age-old tradition of blame-passing.

    Nothing of the sort. Though the PM leaned heavily on her cane as she rose, she seemed to double in stature as she spoke, eyes glinting and her free hand thumping the Dispatch Box: "The Princess Sophia affair is the latest installment in a decades-old policy failure that weakened the security of computer users to the benefit of powerful corporations and our security services. This policy, the so-called ‘anti-circumvention’ rules, have no place in an information society.

    http://craphound.com/?p=5241

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  8. Cory Doctorow on intellectual property in a digital age

    In a keynote speech for The Literary Conference 2014, author and renowned digital publishing pioneer Cory Doctorow talks about his creative experiments on and offline, and addresses head-on the thorny question of ‘Intellectual Property in a Digital Age’.

    http://craphound.com/?p=5227

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  9. Cory Doctorow: Digital failures are inevitable, but we need them to be graceful - Boing Boing

    Banshee fails gracefully because its authors don’t attempt any lock-in. When I find myself diverging from the design philosophy of Banshee to the extent that I want to use a rival system to manage my music, Banshee is designed to assist me in switching. Unlike Apple, Microsoft, and others, who treat you as a product to be bought and sold – and who have engineered laws like the DMCA to make it illegal to convert your files for use with rival products – Banshee is designed to work with me until we part ways, and then to gracefully bow out and let me move on to someone else’s version of this particular bit of plumbing.

    A good example of this is Amazon’s MP3 store. Until recently, it worked beautifully. I’d pay a reasonable price for my music, and Amazon would let me download it to my computer with as little fuss as possible. Recently, that changed. Amazon wants to promote its cloud drive services, so now it requires that you lock yourself into an Amazon-proprietary downloader to get your MP3s. The Amazon MP3 store started life with a lot of rhetoric about liberation (they made t-shirts that trumpeted "DRM: Don’t Restrict Me!") that contrasted their offering with the locked-in world of the iTunes Store. Now that Amazon has won enough marketshare in the MP3 world, it’s using that position to try and gain ground in the world of cloud computing – at the expense of its customers.

    Lucky for me, MP3 is an open format, so MP3 investments fail well. The fact that I bought hundreds of pounds’ worth of music from Amazon doesn’t stop me from taking my business elsewhere now that they’ve decided to treat me as a strategic asset instead of a customer. By contrast, I was once unwise enough to spend thousands on audiobooks from Amazon’s Audible subsidiary (the major player in the audiobook world), kidding myself that the DRM wouldn’t matter. But the day I switched to Ubuntu, I realised that I was going to have to spend a month running three old Macs around the clock in order to re-record all those audiobooks and get them out of their DRM wrappers.

    http://boingboing.net/2014/01/20/podcast-digital-failures-are.html

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  10. Cory Doctorow: Flowers From Al

    Here’s part one of my 2003 short story “Flowers From Al,” written with Charlie Stross for New Voices in Science Fiction, a Mike Resnick anthology. It’s a pervy, weird story of transhuman romance.

    http://mostlysignssomeportents.tumblr.com/post/72469771137/heres-part-one-of-my-2003-short-story-flowers

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