adactio / tags / blindness

Tagged with “blindness” (5)

  1. Can blind people become architects?

    In the latest version of Apple’s software for both iPhones and Macs, a feature has been included that tells websites a screen reader is being used. A screen reader is software that takes information from the screen and turns it in to digital speech or braille. This new feature is turned on by default. While it can be turned off, some blind people argue it shouldn’t be on by default as they don’t want websites or their developers, knowing they are blind. Ben Mustill-Rose is a developer who’s blind working at the BBC. He explains how the feature works and what his, and others’ concerns are.

    Beyond Sight is a project challenging the tendency for architects to prioritise the visual above all else. As part of this, UCL is offering a week-long summer school to visually impaired people interested in becoming architects. The course will cover how design can incorporate other ways of imagining and creating space. We speak to Mandy Redvers-Rowe one of the course coordinators and to Carlos Mourao-Pereira a blind architect.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m0003zvq

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. Wanda Diaz Merced: How a blind astronomer found a way to hear the stars | TED Talk

    Wanda Diaz Merced studies the light emitted by gamma-ray bursts, the most energetic events in the universe. When she lost her sight and was left without a way to do her science, she had a revelatory insight: the light curves she could no longer see could be translated into sound. Through sonification, she regained mastery over her work, and now she’s advocating for a more inclusive scientific community. "Science is for everyone," she says. "It has to be available to everyone, because we are all natural explorers."

    https://www.ted.com/talks/wanda_diaz_merced_how_a_blind_astronomer_found_a_way_to_hear_the_stars

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. Neil Harbisson: I listen to color

    Artist Neil Harbisson was born completely color blind, but these days a device attached to his head turns color into audible frequencies. Instead of seeing a world in grayscale, Harbisson can hear a symphony of color — and yes, even listen to faces and paintings.

    Neil Harbisson’s "eyeborg" allows him to hear colors, even those beyond the range of sight.

    http://www.ted.com/talks/neil_harbisson_i_listen_to_color.html

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. Live From The NYPL: Oliver Sacks — Hallucinations

    The Robert B. Silvers Lecture. Neurologist and author Oliver Sacks examines how the normal brain, if deprived of perceptual input, may generate illusory sensations—as with the visual hallucinations of the blind, or the musical hallucinations of the deaf.

    http://www.nypl.org/research/chss/pep/pepdesc.cfm?id=5843

    —Huffduffed by adactio