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Tagged with “bbc” (341)

  1. Highest-Capacity Data Cable

    There is news of the high-capacity data cable stretching across the Atlantic that has now been completed. The cable is threaded across the ocean floor from Virginia Beach, Virginia to Bilbao, Spain.

    Researchers from MIT are developing a system that allows a “Primer” robot to don various exoskeletons to give it different capabilities. Daniela Rus from MIT joins Click to discuss it.

    Nisha Ligon’s company Ubongo is a winner of this year’s WISE award. Ligon talks about designing digital material for school children in Africa.

    An AI retreat at the location in Norway used for the film Ex-Machina has been the focus of expert discussion on the future of AI. Bill Thompson joined the retreat arranged by Clearleft’s Andy Budd.

    Fixfest, the first international gathering for the community repair movement takes place at the weekend bringing together fixers from Argentina to Norway. Click hears from one of the organisers, Janet Gaunter of the Restart Project and from Jean-Sébastien Bigras whose company Insertech specialises in teaching repair and preventing waste.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/w3cstxl1

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  2. Brian Cox on Robert Oppenheimer

    Significant international thinkers deliver the BBC’s flagship annual lecture series

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p05hctvq

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  3. BBC Radio 4 - In Our Time, Complexity

    Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss complexity theory.

    Melvyn Bragg and his guests discuss complexity and how it can help us understand the world around us. When living beings come together and act in a group, they do so in complicated and unpredictable ways: societies often behave very differently from the individuals within them. Complexity was a phenomenon little understood a generation ago, but research into complex systems now has important applications in many different fields, from biology to political science. Today it is being used to explain how birds flock, to predict traffic flow in cities and to study the spread of diseases.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b03ls154

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  4. Driving Bill Drummond Seriously…

    Bill Drummond is driving to every county in Ireland in five days. But what’s driving Bill?

    Bill Drummond is many things. As well as an artist, a writer and former pop-star - he’s the owner of an old curfew tower in Northern Ireland which he runs as an artists’ residency. Last year some poets from Belfast’s Seamus Heaney Centre for Poetry stayed there and Bill published their collected work in a little black book called The Curfew Tower is Many Things.

    Except for a poem the award-winning Belfast poet Stephen Sexton wrote. Apparently that one went missing. So Bill has left two pages blank in the book for Stephen to fill in with poetry as they drive through all of Ireland’s 32 counties in 5 days in a white Ford Transit hire-van, giving out copies as they go.

    But what exactly is driving Bill Drummond?

    Producer Conor Garrett is there to find out. As they cross the Irish border and over each county boundary, Conor is becoming increasingly concerned he may not have a good enough story for his radio programme. It’s a problem further complicated by the fact Bill won’t talk about his chart-topping ’90s pop band who once famously set fire to a very large pile of their own cash. Then, when a narrative arc does eventually develop, Conor can’t be sure how authentic it is. And what’s all this stuff about eels?

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p05cpm29

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  5. Butterbeer and Grootcakes

    Aleks Krotoski takes her seat at the table to explore the amazing world of fictional food made real.

    Food is not a new force in fiction, but increasingly fictional food is finding its way onto the table. And fan communities from the new breed of modern cultural canon aren’t just nibbling on Laura Esquivel’s devastating quail in rose petal sauce from Like Water for Chocolate, but also tucking in to fried squirrel and raccoon from The Hunger Games, Sansa’s lemon cakes from Game of Thrones, or downing a frothy glass of butterbeer from Harry Potter.

    Now Aleks gathers together three people who know a lot about fictional food to discuss its appeal for fans, authors and food creators alike. Together, they will make, and eat, a meal of food from fiction, and discuss some of the interesting questions it raises.

    Joanne Harris is author of several novels where food is almost a character in its own right - most famously Chocolat, which was turned into a film of the same name; she also co-created a cookbook, The Little Book of Chocolat, for the many fans desperate to make the concoctions they had read about in her novels. Sam Bompas is co-founder of creative food studio Bompas & Parr, who recently helped create Dinner At The Twits, inspired by Roald Dahl’s book. And Kate Young brings together her passion for food and literature in her blog The Little Library Café, where she creates recipes for food found in fiction, and many of them will be included in her first cookbook, The Little Library Cookbook.

    The programme also includes music played on the flavour conductor - a working cocktail organ, conceived by Sam Bompas for Johnnie Walker. The music is composed by Simon Little.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p0560f1h

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  6. Alternate

    Follow The Digital Human’s Aleks Krotoski as she heads down a rabbit hole.

    Aleks Krotoski tells the story of a film that doesn’t exist and the online community convinced that it does.

    We hear from people who have come together on the online site Reddit to share their memories of the film, including a former video shop worker called Don.

    Many of them have very clear memories of watching Shazaam and are convinced it’s disappearance is related to a strange phenomenon called The Mandela Effect, so named after the late South African activist Nelson Mandela.

    We follow Don on an epic journey as he tries to uncover proof. Along the way we’ll encounter conspiracy theories, alternate worlds, computer simulations and a recently deceased Australian inventor called Henry Hoke. It’s going to get weird.

    But what does this willingness to believe in something despite all evidence to the contrary tell us about the online world and the way communities form in the digital sphere?

    Aleks speaks with anthropologist Genevieve Bell about the stories we tell; cognitive scientist Donald Hoffman and Professor of Philosophy at Oxford University Nick Bostrom. Amelia Tait of the New Statesman explains how the story of Shazaam has evolved online.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b08pdy0f

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  7. Who Knows Where the Time Goes?

    Memories of the much-loved song Who Knows Where the Time Goes? written by Sandy Denny.

    Sandy Denny was just 19 years old when she wrote ‘Who Knows Where the Time Goes?’, her much-loved song about the passing of time. Soul Music tells the story behind the song and speaks to people for whom it has special meaning.

    The record producer Joe Boyd and founder member of Fairport Convention Simon Nicol remember Sandy and her music. We speak to musicians who have covered the song, including folk legend Judy Collins and the singer Rufus Wainwright, about what the song means to them. And we hear from people whose lives have been touched by the song, including the singer-songwriter Ren Harvieu, who suffered a back break in a freak accident and found strength in the song during her recovery. And neuroscientist and best-selling author David Eagleman explains why the years seem to fly past ever more quickly as we grow older. Also featuring contributions from Sandy Denny’s biographer Mick Houghton and Dr Richard Elliott, Senior Lecturer in Music at Newcastle University.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b08tcnmk

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  8. Wichita Lineman

    People reflect on the emotional impact of the country-pop crossover track.

    Wichita Lineman, the ultimate country/pop crossover track, is the subject of this week’s Soul Music.

    David Crary is a lineman from Oklahoma. He describes his job - storm-chasing to mend fallen power-lines; travelling on ‘dirt roads, gravel roads, paved roads… up in the farmlands of Illinois and Missouri… down south in the Swamplands… it ain’t nothing to swerve in the middle of the road in your bucket-truck to miss an alligator ‘.

    He recalls the first time he heard Wichita Lineman, travelling in the back of his family’s Station Wagon, listening to the radio… thinking that being a lineman ‘must be a cool job’ if someone’s written a song about it. Also a part-time musician, David has recorded his own version of the song which sums up his working life… on the road, working long hours, away from his wife and six kids.

    Wichita Lineman was written by Jimmy Webb for the Country star Glen Campbell. It tells the story of a lonely lineman in the American midwest, travelling vast distances to mend power and telephone lines.

    Released in 1968 it’s an enduring classic, crossing the boundary between pop and country. It’s been covered many times, but it’s Glen Campbell’s version which remains the best loved and most played.

    Johnny Cash also recorded an extraordinary and very raw version. Peter Lewry, a lifelong Cash fan, describes how this recording came about, towards the end of Cash’s career.

    Meggean Ward’s father was a lineman in Rhode Island… her memories of seeing him in green work trousers, a plaid shirt and black boots, wrapping his cracked hands in bandages every morning before setting off to climb telephone poles are interwoven forever with Wichita Lineman… as a child she always felt the song was written for her father, who else?

    Glen Campbell also gave an interview for this programme. Shortly after the interview was recorded, Campbell went public about his diagnosis of Alzheimer’s. His contribution to the programme is brief, and includes an acoustic performance of the song. It was a real privilege to record this, appropriately enough, down the line.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b013f96w

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  9. BBC Radio 4 - In Our Time, Darwin: In Our Time, Darwin: The Voyage of the Beagle

    How Darwin’s work during the Beagle expedition influenced his theories.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00gbf2g

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  10. Can Robots be Truly Intelligent?

    From Skynet and the Terminator franchise, through Wargames and Ava in Ex Machina, artificial intelligences pervade our cinematic experiences. But AIs are already in the real world, answering our questions on our phones and making diagnoses about our health. Adam Rutherford asks if we are ready for AI, when fiction becomes reality, and we create thinking machines.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p0548s57

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