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Tagged with “bbc” (307)

  1. The Concertina Man—BBC World Service Programme, 07 September 2004

    BBC programme on the history and music of the concertina, focusing on its inventor Sir Charles Wheatstone as a somewhat belated recognition of his bicentenary in 2002.

    In addition to the presenter, Peter Day, the program features (in order of appearance) Bob Gaskins, Brian Bowers, Margaret Birley, Stephen Chambers, Frank James, Douglas Rogers, Sean Minnie, and Steve Dickinson.

    The program was produced by Neil Koenig.

    BBC World Service programme broadcast 07 September 2004.

    http://www.concertina.com/concertina-man/

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  2. BBC Radio 4 - Seriously…, The Art of StarCraft

    Stephen Evans goes deep into the Milky Way to look at the phenomenon of StarCraft.

    Stephen Evans goes deep into the Milky Way to look at the phenomenon of StarCraft and reveals how, in South Korea, it is more than just a computer game and is a key part of the rapidly growing multi-billion dollar world of esports. Worth over $620 million globally, with a worldwide audience of over 135 million people, esports are now big business, and in South Korea much of this thanks to the impact of certain computer game called StarCraft. StarCraft is essentially a sci-fi, military-based real-time strategy (RTS) game developed and published by Blizzard Entertainment. It was released in 1998 and in the years since has become one of the world’s most popular computer game titles shifting over 11 million copies and spawning a mainstream cultural sensation in South Korea where thousands of fans pack into stadiums across the country to watch the best StarCraft players in the world battle it out for big money stakes. From the importance of PC Bangs - the ubiquitous street corner hubs for gaming fans - to the multi-million dollar world of professional StarCraft and esports Soul-based journalist and broadcaster Stephen Evans joins the dots of how this game took root in a South Korean society that embraced super fast broadband and was thirsty for a multi-scenario, multi-player and multi-layered challenge. Socially inclusive, cheap and available to everyone, since the late 1990s online gaming has taken this nation of 50 million people by storm, and StarCraft is central to this way of life. This way of life has brought dizzying successes and change, but with it the issue of addiction and related health problems the South Korean government have been forced to regulate this brave new world to tackle issues that are becoming increasingly relevant to policy makers outside of the Korean peninsular.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p03c4kn8

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  3. BBC Radio 4 - Seriously…, Six Degrees of Connection

    Julia Hobsbawm investigates the idea that we are all connected by only six links.

    Is everyone in the world really connected by only six links?

    A famous experiment by social psychologist Stanley Milgram in the 1960s claimed that it took on average only six steps for a message to pass between two strangers in America. Since then the idea has become part of popular culture. But is it true? And if so, does it matter? Julia Hobsbawm investigates how social networks work, whether we should all pay more attention to our network connections, and whether governments can use social networks to promote - for instance - messages about health. Maybe, she discovers, it’s not the six degrees of separation that matter, but the three degrees of influence.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p03kr7cx

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  4. BBC Radio 4 - Seriously…, The Force of Google

    Google dominates internet searching. Rory Cellan-Jones asks if it is too powerful.

    Google dominates internet searching across most parts of the globe. The algorithm which produces its search results is highly secret and always changing, but is crucial in influencing the information we all obtain, the viewpoints we read, the people we find out about, and the products we buy.

    It dominates the market because it’s so effective. Rivals find it difficult to compete. But however good the algorithm, however carefully crafted to give us what Google thinks we actually want, is it really healthy for one search engine, and one company, to have so much impact?

    Rory Cellan-Jones explores Google’s uniquely powerful role at the centre of today’s information society.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p03tprfw

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  5. BBC Radio 4 - Seriously…, Songs for the Dead

    Marie-Louise Muir explores the tradition of keening for the dead in Ireland.

    Keeners were the women of rural Ireland who were traditionally paid to cry, wail and sing over the bodies of the dead at funerals and wakes. Their role was to help channel the grief of the bereaved and they had an elevated, almost mythical status among their communities. The custom of keening had all but vanished by the 1950’s as people began to view it as primitive, old-fashioned and uncivilised.

    Now, broadcaster Marie-Louise Muir sets out to ask what’s been lost with the passing of the keeners.

    She travels to Inis Mor, a remote island off the west coast of Ireland, where one of Ireland’s last professional keeners - Brigid Mullin - was recorded by the song collector and archivist Sidney Robertson Cowell in the 1950’s. Brigid’s crackling, eerie evocation of sorrow echoes down the years to capture a tradition in its dying days - a ghostly remnant of another world.

    Dr Deirdre Ni Chonghaile is a native of Inis Mor and thinks modern funerals have taken on an almost Victorian dignity in a society that in general has become far less tolerant of extravagant displays of grief. Deirdre believes it was this very extravagance that helped lead to keening’s demise. Its emphasis on the body and human mortality was in direct conflict with the notion of a Christian afterlife and the influential role of the keening women may even have been regarded as a threat to the patriarchy of the Church.

    As the story of the keeners blends with the waves and winds of Ireland’s west coast, Marie-Louise reflects on the passing of this once rich tradition.

    Producer: Conor McKay.

    Recordings:

    Bridget Mullin with Sidney Robertson Cowell, keen performance and conversation. Smithsonian Folkways, Ralph Rinzler Archives.

    Neil O’Boyle, keen demonstration on fiddle. Irish Traditional Music Archive, Dublin

    Eithne Ni Uilleachan, ‘Grief’ from the album Bilingua (Gael Linn)

    The Gloaming ‘The Pilgrim’s Song’ from the album ‘2’ (Real World)

    Milk Carton Kids ‘Wish You Were Here’ (Anti/Epitaph)

    Brian Eno ‘The Ship’ (Warp)

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p0455jf1

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  6. BBC Radio 4 - Seriously…, Steve Earle’s Songwriting Bootcamp

    The legendary country singer-songwriter unveils the secrets of composing a great song.

    Legendary country singer-songwriter Steve Earle unveils the secrets of composing a great song. Every year he runs a four-day intensive training session in the Catskill Mountains in upstate New York. Journalist and aspiring songwriter Hugh Levinson joined around 100 other would-be balladeers to see what they can learn both from Steve and his fellow teacher, Shawn Colvin. Listen in to stories of dreaming, methadone, guns, jail, death and betrayal. All the good stuff.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p04flsmq

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  7. BBC World Service - The Forum, Do we Need Artificial Intelligence?

    Listen in pop-out player

    Look out of the window and you won’t see many robots – but the AI revolution is here. The relentless encroachment of machine-thinking into every aspect of our lives is transforming the way we think and act. Machine-learning algorithms drive our smartphones and social media - and they are increasingly present in our homes, offices, schools and hospitals. Whether driving cars, diagnosing disease or marking essays, artificial intelligence is everywhere. But how does machine-thinking compare to human thought and what are the limitations of AI? From biased training data to impenetrable black-box algorithms, Quentin Cooper and guests explore the strengths and limitations of AI.

    To discuss whether we need AI are - Zoubin Ghahramani, professor of Information Engineering at the University of Cambridge and deputy director of the Leverhulme Centre for the Future of Intelligence; Lydia Nicholas, senior researcher at the British innovation foundation Nesta; Professor Kentaro Toyama of the University of Michigan, co-founder of Microsoft Research India and author of Geek Heresy: Rescuing Social Change from the Cult of Technology.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p04c7kdx

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  8. BBC Radio 4 - The Infinite Monkey Cage, Series 9, Science and Spin

    A witty, irreverent and unashamedly rational look at the world of science communication.

    Listen in pop-out player

    This week on the Infinite Monkey Cage, Brian Cox and Robin Ince take to the stage at Manchester University, to discuss the state of science communication. Is the public engaged enough with the complexities of science? Are scientists engaging enough with the hoi polloi or still stuck in their ivory towers? And when was the ‘golden age’ of TV science, if it ever existed? Joining our presenters are scientists Matthew Cobb and Sheena Cruikshank, comedian Helen Keen and legendary science TV presenter and writer, James Burke, whose classic series ‘Connections’ captivated audiences around the world.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b03m43fx

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  9. BBC Radio - Ouch: Disability Talk, Facebook salad

    Meet Matt King. He’s an enngineer who works at Facebook HQ in California. He’s one of the people on a team who works towards making the big social network accessible. (a transcript of this podcast will appear on this page soon)

    King explains the recent AI innovation on Facebook which describes photos to blind people. He talks about future aspirations and tells us what you can get to eat on Facebook campus, for free, at lunchtime. His favourite is a huge big salad, hence the title of this podcast.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p049l1p7

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  10. BBC Radio 4 - Desert Island Discs, William Gibson

    This week the castaway on Desert Island Discs is William Gibson. Long before the existence of the Internet, he wrote about ‘cyberspace’, a boundless world reached only through computers. External space travel, to the Moon and Mars, had become old hat. By creating internal space, he breathed new life into science fiction. In conversation with Sue Lawley, he talks about his life and work and chooses eight records to take to the mythical island.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p00941v7

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