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Tagged with “bbc” (336)

  1. Alternate

    Follow The Digital Human’s Aleks Krotoski as she heads down a rabbit hole.

    Aleks Krotoski tells the story of a film that doesn’t exist and the online community convinced that it does.

    We hear from people who have come together on the online site Reddit to share their memories of the film, including a former video shop worker called Don.

    Many of them have very clear memories of watching Shazaam and are convinced it’s disappearance is related to a strange phenomenon called The Mandela Effect, so named after the late South African activist Nelson Mandela.

    We follow Don on an epic journey as he tries to uncover proof. Along the way we’ll encounter conspiracy theories, alternate worlds, computer simulations and a recently deceased Australian inventor called Henry Hoke. It’s going to get weird.

    But what does this willingness to believe in something despite all evidence to the contrary tell us about the online world and the way communities form in the digital sphere?

    Aleks speaks with anthropologist Genevieve Bell about the stories we tell; cognitive scientist Donald Hoffman and Professor of Philosophy at Oxford University Nick Bostrom. Amelia Tait of the New Statesman explains how the story of Shazaam has evolved online.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b08pdy0f

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  2. Who Knows Where the Time Goes?

    Memories of the much-loved song Who Knows Where the Time Goes? written by Sandy Denny.

    Sandy Denny was just 19 years old when she wrote ‘Who Knows Where the Time Goes?’, her much-loved song about the passing of time. Soul Music tells the story behind the song and speaks to people for whom it has special meaning.

    The record producer Joe Boyd and founder member of Fairport Convention Simon Nicol remember Sandy and her music. We speak to musicians who have covered the song, including folk legend Judy Collins and the singer Rufus Wainwright, about what the song means to them. And we hear from people whose lives have been touched by the song, including the singer-songwriter Ren Harvieu, who suffered a back break in a freak accident and found strength in the song during her recovery. And neuroscientist and best-selling author David Eagleman explains why the years seem to fly past ever more quickly as we grow older. Also featuring contributions from Sandy Denny’s biographer Mick Houghton and Dr Richard Elliott, Senior Lecturer in Music at Newcastle University.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b08tcnmk

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  3. Wichita Lineman

    People reflect on the emotional impact of the country-pop crossover track.

    Wichita Lineman, the ultimate country/pop crossover track, is the subject of this week’s Soul Music.

    David Crary is a lineman from Oklahoma. He describes his job - storm-chasing to mend fallen power-lines; travelling on ‘dirt roads, gravel roads, paved roads… up in the farmlands of Illinois and Missouri… down south in the Swamplands… it ain’t nothing to swerve in the middle of the road in your bucket-truck to miss an alligator ‘.

    He recalls the first time he heard Wichita Lineman, travelling in the back of his family’s Station Wagon, listening to the radio… thinking that being a lineman ‘must be a cool job’ if someone’s written a song about it. Also a part-time musician, David has recorded his own version of the song which sums up his working life… on the road, working long hours, away from his wife and six kids.

    Wichita Lineman was written by Jimmy Webb for the Country star Glen Campbell. It tells the story of a lonely lineman in the American midwest, travelling vast distances to mend power and telephone lines.

    Released in 1968 it’s an enduring classic, crossing the boundary between pop and country. It’s been covered many times, but it’s Glen Campbell’s version which remains the best loved and most played.

    Johnny Cash also recorded an extraordinary and very raw version. Peter Lewry, a lifelong Cash fan, describes how this recording came about, towards the end of Cash’s career.

    Meggean Ward’s father was a lineman in Rhode Island… her memories of seeing him in green work trousers, a plaid shirt and black boots, wrapping his cracked hands in bandages every morning before setting off to climb telephone poles are interwoven forever with Wichita Lineman… as a child she always felt the song was written for her father, who else?

    Glen Campbell also gave an interview for this programme. Shortly after the interview was recorded, Campbell went public about his diagnosis of Alzheimer’s. His contribution to the programme is brief, and includes an acoustic performance of the song. It was a real privilege to record this, appropriately enough, down the line.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b013f96w

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  4. BBC Radio 4 - In Our Time, Darwin: In Our Time, Darwin: The Voyage of the Beagle

    How Darwin’s work during the Beagle expedition influenced his theories.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00gbf2g

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  5. Can Robots be Truly Intelligent?

    From Skynet and the Terminator franchise, through Wargames and Ava in Ex Machina, artificial intelligences pervade our cinematic experiences. But AIs are already in the real world, answering our questions on our phones and making diagnoses about our health. Adam Rutherford asks if we are ready for AI, when fiction becomes reality, and we create thinking machines.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p0548s57

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  6. Spotlight: Sareh Heidari — Responsive Web Design

    This week we are joined by Sareh Heidari, a web developer at BBC News, who talks about accessibility, globalization, and CSS at scale.

    https://responsivewebdesign.com/podcast/sareh-heidari/

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  7. Tim O’Brien on transient stars and science and music festivals

    Tim O’Brien has earned the nickname ‘the awesome astrophysicist dude from Jodrell Bank’ He is Professor of Astrophysics at Manchester University, and the associate director of Jodrell Bank Observatory, best known for the giant, iconic radio dish of the world-famous Lovell telescope which sits majestically on the Cheshire plain, where he carries out research on the behaviour of transient binary stars called novae.

    For twenty-five years Tim O’Brien has been telling the public about astronomy, and recently he’s also become an organiser of concerts. Building on some very successful one-day events, the first Blue Dot Festival was held at Jodrell Bank in July 2016 and the second will be this summer. Tim talks to Jim al-Khalil about how he pops up on stage between acts to tell the audience about science - and doesn’t get bottled off!

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b08r1skf

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  8. Patterns Day: Sareh Heidari

    Sareh Heidari speaking at Patterns Day in Brighton on June 30, 2017.

    A one-day event for web designers and developers on design systems, pattern libraries, style guides, and components.

    Patterns Day is brought to you by Clearleft.

    https://patternsday.com/

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  9. 50 Things That Made the Modern Economy: Passports

    How much might global economic output rise if anyone could work anywhere? Some economists have calculated it would double. By the turn of the 20th century only a handful of countries were still insisting on passports to enter or leave. Today, migrant controls are back in fashion. It can seem like a natural fact of life that the name of the country on our passport determines where you can travel and work – legally, at least.

    But it’s a relatively recent historical development – and, from a certain angle, an odd one. Many countries take pride in banning employers from discriminating against characteristics we can’t change: whether we’re male or female, young or old, gay or straight, black or white.

    It’s not entirely true that we can’t change our passport: if you’ve got $250,000, for example, you can buy one from St Kitts and Nevis. But mostly our passport depends on the identity of our parents and location of our birth. And nobody chooses those.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p052spyb

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  10. The Digital Human: Haunted

    Aleks Krotoski asks if we are haunted by our technology, or are we haunting it?

    So much of our experience of technology can feel a bit like being haunted. It starts like any good ghost story with the just mildly unsettling; things aren’t were you left them or seem to have moved on their own within our devices. Its a creepy feeling that leaves you unsure about what to believe. Our understanding of how much of technology works is so limited that when it starts to behave out of the ordinary we have no explanation. This is when we start to make very peculiar judgement’s; "why did you do that" we plead, as if some hidden force was at work.

    For some these feelings of being haunted by our technology can develop into full blown apparitions; keen gamers frequently experience Game transfer Phenomena where they literally see images of their game play in the real world, an involuntary augmented reality. While the hallucinations aren’t necessarily distressing in themselves the experiences can leave individuals questioning their sanity.

    The coming internet of things will bring problems of its own; smart locks that mysteriously open by themselves for example as if under the influence of some poltergeist. Aleks herself has had the experience of digital ‘gas lighting’ (a term drawn from an Ingrid Bergman movie of a woman being driven mad by husband) when her partner logged on to their home automation system remotely and started to mess with the lights while Aleks was home alone. As one commentator puts it in a reworking of the old Arthur C. Clarke quote "any sufficiently advanced hacking is indistinguishable from haunting."

    And as our devices and appliances increasingly start talking to each other bypassing us altogether who’s to say we, like Nicole Kidman’s character in The Others, haven’t become the ghost in the machine.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b080t0p9

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