adactio / tags / authors

Tagged with “authors” (9)

  1. Bruce Sterling at The Interval at Long Now | San Francisco

    Bruce Sterling at The Interval: The future is a kind of history that hasn’t happened yet. The past is a kind of future that has already happened.

    The present moment vanishes before it can be described. Language, a human invention, lacks the power to fully adhere to reality.

    We live in a very short now and here, since the flow of events in spacetime is mostly closed to human comprehension. But we have to say something about the future, since we have to live there. So what can we say? Being “futuristic” is a problem in metaphysics; it’s about getting language to adhere to an unknowable reality. But the futuristic quickly becomes old-fashioned, so how can the news stay news?

    Bruce Sterling is a futurist, journalist, science-fiction author, and culture critic. He is the author of more than 20 books including ground-breaking science ficiton and non-fiction about hackers, design and the future. He was the editor in 01986 of Mirrorshades: The Cyberpunk Anthology (1986) which brought the cyberpunk science fiction sub-genre to a much wider audience. He previous spoke for Long Now about "The Singularity: Your Future as a Black Hole" in 02004. His Beyond the Beyond blog on Wired.com is now in its 15th year. His most recent book is Pirate Utopia.

    https://theinterval.org/salon-talks/02018/oct/16/how-be-futuristic-bruce-sterling

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. 231: Book Writing Panel - ShopTalk

    We’re back talking books and we’re joined by 4 other technical book authors to discuss why we wrote a book, figuring out where to start, whether writing takes you out of the game, and should you write for fun or profit?

    Q & A

    7:30 Why did Brad Frost write a book?

    10:40 Why did Richard Feldman write a book on Elm?

    13:00 Simon King: why a book about industrial design?

    15:40 What was Val’s path to writing a book about web animation?

    18:40 Should you be an expert first and then write a book or become an expert by writing a book?

    31:50 Was it the process of writing the book worth it?

    43:40 Does writing a book take you out of the game?

    54:40 What’s the difference between a book and a blog post?

    Links

    Val Head / @vlh on Twitter

    📗 Designing Interface Animation

    Simon King

    📗 Understanding Industrial Design

    Richard Feldman

    📗 Elm in Action

    Brad Frost / @brad_frost on Twitter

    📗 Atomic Design

    🎥 What Comes Next is the Future

    Workshop on Elm with FrontEnd Masters

    🎙 Style Guide Podcast

    http://shoptalkshow.com/episodes/231-book-writing-panel/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. Selected Shorts - The Sun and the Moon

    Fantasy writer Italo Calvino offers a fable about love on and off the moon. “The Distance of the Moon” is read by Broadway star Liev Schreiber. And sci-fi master Ray Bradbury imagines life on a sunless Venus, where it has rained for seven years. Michael Cerveris reads “All Summer in a Day.”

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. Inside the Imagination of China Mieville

    China Miéville is probably the best new writer in the ‘new weird’ genre. He’s got a seriously prolific output and he manages to push the limits of fantasy, science fiction and horror to a very appreciative younger audience.

    He’s pulled together a whole bunch of skills: fantasy/science fiction writer; would be politician - he ran on the Socialist Alliance ticket for the UK general election in 2001 - and he did his Phd on Marxism and International Law at the London School of Economics. He also draws and writes comics.

    He could only be British.

    This conversation covers high surrealism, pulp modernism, H.P. Lovecraft, the Call of Cthulhu and a love of garbage, octopuses and trains.

    If you don’t read his books, your teenage children probably do…and love him.

    China is generous with questions from the audience – as he should be, they buy his books, but not every writer is; and he seriously addresses the basic structuring of his books in answer to a keen young fan. If you follow him on various blogs, you’ll notice that he seems very connected to his audience.

    Writer James Bradley is in conversation with him at the Perth Writers Festival, and they begin talking about his latest book, Railsea.

    http://www.abc.net.au/tv/bigideas/stories/2013/03/25/3719956.htm

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. How Ray Bradbury Changed The World

    How the amazing Ray Bradbury changed science fiction, literature, and the world.

    Sam Weller, professor of fiction writing at Columbia College in Chicago. He’s the co-editor of the upcoming anthology Shadow Show: All-New Stories in Celebration of Ray Bradbury.

    Gary Wolfe, award-winning science fiction editor, critic, and biographer. Professor of humanities at Roosevelt University.

    http://onpoint.wbur.org/2012/06/08/how-ray-bradbury

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. The Guardian Books Podcast: Looking ahead in science fiction

    Science fiction is the marmite of literature – people tend to love it or hate it. Yet no one could deny that it has produced many of the great myths of our age, from Frankenstein’s monster to William Gibson’s cyber-reality.

    SF blogger Damien Walter joins our panellists to discuss where it is now, and why we should all tune in to a genre that can be satirical, prophetic, political and plain good fun, often all at the same time. He also outlines some of the titles to look out for in 2010.

    We also look at John Wyndham’s previously unpublished novel, Plan for Chaos, and interview China Miéville, rising star of the "new weird".

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/audio/2010/jan/14/science-fiction-books-podcast

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. Authors on Tour: Neal Stephenson — Anathem

    Since childhood, Raz has lived behind the walls of a 3,400-year-old monastery, a sanctuary for scientists, philosophers, and mathematicians. There, he and his cohorts are sealed off from the illiterate, irrational, unpredictable “saecular” world, an endless landscape of casinos and megastores that is plagued by recurring cycles of booms and busts, dark ages and renaissances, world wars and climate change. Until the day that a higher power, driven by fear, decides it is only these cloistered scholars who have the abilities to avert an impending catastrophe. And, one by one, Raz and his friends, mentors, and teachers are summoned forth without warning into the unknown.

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  8. John Hodgman—The Areas of My Expertise

    John Hodgman (accompanied by his personal troubador, Jonathan Coulton), provides a hilarious look into his first book, The Areas of My Expertise, which is a brilliant (and funny) compendium of trivia and wisdom on topics large and small. Make sure you stay tuned for the author’s theme song (performed by Coulton) and the Q&A by walkie talkie, which has to be a podcasting first!

    http://authorsontourlive.com/aot-31-john-hodgman-podcasts-the-areas-of-my-expertise/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  9. To The Best Of Our Knowledge - The Future of Science Fiction

    Space, the final frontier. But is science fiction the final frontier when it comes to being a literature of ideas? In this hour of To the Best of Our Knowledge, we’ll wax philosophical about science fiction with two of the genre’s greatest writers — George R.R. Martin and Ursula K. Le Guin. And we’ll explore H.P. Lovecraft’s literary philosophy of "Cosmicism."

    http://wpr.org/book/081123a.cfm

    —Huffduffed by adactio