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Tagged with “attention” (4)

  1. Longform Podcast #289: Craig Mod · Longform

    Craig Mod is a writer and photographer. His podcast is On Margins.

    “You pick up an iPad, you pick up an iPhone—what are you picking up? You’re picking up a chemical-driven casino that just plays on your most base desires for vanity and ego and our obsession with watching train wrecks happen. That’s what we’re picking up and it’s counted in pageviews, because—not to be reductive and say that it’s a capitalist issue, but when you take hundreds of millions of dollars of venture capital, and you’re building models predicated on advertising, you are gonna create fucked-up algorithms and shitty loops that take away your attention. And guess what? You need to engage with longform texts. You need control of your attention. And so I think part of what subverted our ability to find this utopian reading space is the fact that so much of what’s on these devices is actively working to destroy all of the qualities needed to create that space.”

    https://longform.org/posts/longform-podcast-289-craig-mod

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. 003: Craig Mod – I Want My Attention Back! - Hurry Slowly

    Designer Craig Mod on how you can break free from the shackles of “attention slavery” and regain control over your powers of concentration.

    http://hurryslowly.co/003-craig-mod/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. BBC: Four Thought: Matt Locke: Empires of Attention

    Four Thought talks include stories and ideas which will affect our future, in politics, society, the economy, business, science, technology or the arts. Recorded live, the talks are given by a range of people with a new thought to share.

    Matt Locke traces the stories of three ‘empires of attention’ to examine how our attention, and the way it was measured, has shaped our culture.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/podcasts/series/fourthought

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. Nick Bilton on how technology creatively disrupts society

    Nick Bilton, Lead Technology Writer for The New York Times Bits blog and a reporter for the paper, discusses his new book, I Live in the Future & Here’s How It Works. In the book, Bilton examines how technology is creatively disrupting society, business, and our brains. On the podcast, he talks about neuroplasticity and reading, a debate with George Packer about Twitter, innovators’ dilemmas in the porn industry, why many CEOs and movie producers bristle at how the future works, and “ricochet working.” He also discusses effects of combining human curation with computer algorithms, hyperpersonalization, informational veggies, and serendipity. He concludes with his theory about today’s news (and the reason he doesn’t worry about missing tweets): “If it’s important, it will find me.”

    http://surprisinglyfree.com/2010/09/27/nick-bilton/

    —Huffduffed by adactio