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Tagged with “archives” (12)

  1. Episode 7: The Computermen — The Last Archive

    In 1966, just as the foundations of the Internet were getting dreamed up…

    the federal government considered building a National Data Center. It would be a centralized federal facility to hold computer records from each federal agency, in the same way that the Library of Congress holds books and the National Archives holds manuscripts. Proponents argued that it would help regulate and compile the vast quantities of data the government was collecting. Quickly, though, fears about privacy, government conspiracies, and government ineptitude buried the idea. But now, that National Data Center looks like a missed opportunity to create rules about data and privacy before the Internet took off. And in the absence of government action, corporations have made those rules themselves.

    https://www.thelastarchive.com/season-1/episode-7-the-computermen

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  2. Abby Smith Rumsey on Remembering, Forgetting, and When We Are No More - Econlib

    You might think your tweets on Twitter belong to you. But in 2010, the Library of Congress acquired the entire archive of Twitter. Why would such a majestic library acquire such seemingly ephemeral material? Historian Abby Smith Rumsey, author of When We Are No More, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about this decision of the Library of Congress and the general challenge of how to cope with a world when so much of what we write and read is digital. Subjects discussed include what we can learn from the past, the power of collective memory, what is worth saving, and how we might archive our electronic lives so that we and those who come after us can find what we might be looking for.

    http://www.econtalk.org/abby-smith-rumsey-on-remembering-forgetting-and-when-we-are-no-more/

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  3. The Far Future

    How do we prepare for the distant future? Helen Keen meets the people who try to.

    If our tech society continues then we can leave data for future generations in huge, mundane quantities, detailing our every tweet and Facebook ‘like’. But how long could this information be stored? And if society as we know it ends, will our achievements vanish with it? How do we plan for and protect those who will be our distant descendants and yet may have hopes, fears, languages, beliefs, even religions that we simply cannot predict? What if anything can we, should we, pass on?

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p05sxgvj

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  4. Preserving the Internet of the Past, Building the Internet of the Future | WCAI

    The internet is so ingrained in our daily lives, that it can be hard to remember life before it. And it changes so quickly it’s equally hard to know what the future might hold. One thing that’s clear is that more and more people will be connected and doing more and different things with this technology.

    It’s a bit tricky to pinpoint when the internet began. Was it the first email? The first public network? What we do know is exactly when we started keeping a record of what’s on the web - October 26, 1996.

    That’s the day Brewster Kahle launched Internet Archive. A computer engineer, internet activist, and digital librarian, Kahle draws inspiration from the Library of Congress and – further back – the great Library of Alexandria. Universal access to all knowledge is his ideal.

    As early as 1980, the idea that internet technology could make that possible was floating around the computer science community. As technology improved, the idea grew. By 1996, Kahle could archive every page from every website every two months.

    “It was kind of like what the search engines were doing,” he told WCAI. “Take a snapshot, and another snapshot, and another snapshot, and another snapshot, and we’ve been doing that for 20 years.”

    Twenty years of the web is a lot of data. The archive is currently 265 billion pages. Internet Archive also includes music, digitized books, and just about anything Kahle can legally get his hands on.

    “Whoever is going to be president in 20 years, we probably have her website [from] when she’s in high school,” he said.

    That may seem unnecessary, even unwelcome, to some. Kahle concedes there is plenty on the web that isn’t intended for posterity, and Internet Archive respects requests to have content removed. But he sees value in preserving web content that might be lost inadvertently.

    “Even though we use this metaphor of ‘page,’ which sounds like books, which sounds like permanent, it really isn’t,” he said. “The average life of a web page is only 100 days.”

    In the Internet Archive, those ephemeral pages become part of a permanent record of our collective internet experience. Browsing the Internet Archive, one lesson is immediately apparent – that experience has changed a lot in twenty years.

    http://capeandislands.org/post/preserving-internet-past-building-internet-future#stream/0

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  5. Internet Archive Founder Brewster Kahle on Preserving Knowledge and Affordable Housing

    Brewster Kahle wants all knowledge to be accessible digitally. He has worked for over 25 years to make that dream a reality. Kahle is the founder of the Internet Archive, a free online library that preserves books, movies, music, software and even websites via its Wayback Machine. Today, Kahle is also trying to apply open source principles to ease the Bay Area housing crisis. He joins us as part of our First Person series, which highlights the leaders and innovators who make the Bay Area unique.

    https://www.popuparchive.com/collections/3246/items/44451

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  6. AirTalk | Keepers of history warn digital era could cause material to vanish

    Speaking to the country’s leading academics last week, a Google innovator, Vint Cerf, warned today’s important records are at risk of being forever lost because of technological obsolescence, plus the transitory nature of emails and the like.

    Predicting a "forgotten generation, or even a forgotten century," Cerf said "digital vellum" must be developed to preserve old software and hardware so photos, emails and documents can be recovered from floppy disks, for example, or any other soon-to-be obsolete medium. More worrisome is that material with unknown value would disappear. For instance, the as-yet-undiscovered Charles Dickens of today, unlike his/her predecessor, likely is not sending hand-written correspondence to fellow editors and writers - leaving 22nd century students without many clues about process and development.

    What else do we risk losing due to digitization? What historical documents do you consider treasures? If you are a content creator, do you take steps to preserve your e-mails, photos and the like?

    Guests:

    Brewster Kahle, Digital Librarian and Founder of the Internet Archive, a non-profit building a free library of Internet sites and other cultural artifacts in digital form

    Sue Hodson, Curator of Literary Manuscripts, The Huntington Library

    http://www.scpr.org/programs/airtalk/2015/02/18/41603/keepers-of-history-warn-digital-era-could-cause-ma/

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  7. Douglas Coupland & William Gibson - Key West Literary Seminar Audio Archives

    Douglas Coupland and William Gibson discuss culture, technology, and the craft of writing. Communications technologies are a global memory prosthesis, says Gibson, and aspire to an experience in which distinctions between the "virtual" and the "real" are dissolved. We are already the borg, Gibson says.

    http://www.kwls.org/podcasts/douglas-coupland-william-gibson/

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