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Tagged with “architecture” (27)

  1. Can blind people become architects?

    In the latest version of Apple’s software for both iPhones and Macs, a feature has been included that tells websites a screen reader is being used. A screen reader is software that takes information from the screen and turns it in to digital speech or braille. This new feature is turned on by default. While it can be turned off, some blind people argue it shouldn’t be on by default as they don’t want websites or their developers, knowing they are blind. Ben Mustill-Rose is a developer who’s blind working at the BBC. He explains how the feature works and what his, and others’ concerns are.

    Beyond Sight is a project challenging the tendency for architects to prioritise the visual above all else. As part of this, UCL is offering a week-long summer school to visually impaired people interested in becoming architects. The course will cover how design can incorporate other ways of imagining and creating space. We speak to Mandy Redvers-Rowe one of the course coordinators and to Carlos Mourao-Pereira a blind architect.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m0003zvq

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. Bruce Sterling: Speculative architecture (September 26, 2018)

    Hernan Diaz Alonso introduces Bruce Sterling, explaining that this lecture is part of a residency at SCI-Arc, including masterclasses with students.

    Bruce Sterling proposes to speculate about architecture in the 2040s and the 2050s, when the students in the room will be in their 50s. He reviews his longstanding engagement with architecture, and pauses to note the recent passing of Robert Venturi, characterizing him as the rare futurist whose works continue to be a source of inspiration.

    Sterling discusses current situations that suggest issues that could be significant in thirty years, including: •China’s terraforming projects in the South China Sea, and the Belt and Road Initiative. •Astana, Kazakhstan, which Sterling describes as neither Fatehpur Sikri nor Brasília, nor the future, but a possibility. •Dubai as a technocratic autocracy that will not become a hegemon but an entrepôt of futurity •Sterling discusses Estonia’s e-residency initiative as an architectural problem that that will become common in the future, requiring off-shore pop-ups promoting Virtual Estonia, physical bank/embassy registration sites, a physical headquarters within Estonia, plus the physical structures required by virtual enterprises. •In Estonia’s capital Tallinn, Sterling discovered another architectural problem of the mid-21st century: abandoned, failed megastructures, located in sites that will probably be flodded, such as the Lenin Palace of Culture and Sports (Raine Karp and Riina Altmäe, 1980). •Seasteading, which Sterling dismisses as impractical. •Sterling also criticizes efforts of architects to design around the problem of climate-change flooding as “architectural solutionism”. •Sterling considers one result of rising sea levels will be a global proliferation of unregulated squatter districts like Christiania, in Copenhagen: “wet favelas” detached from municipal services. •He notes push-back against Silicon Valley cultural imperialism (e.g. Uber and Airbnb) in places like Barcelona and Turin, as another issue that will grow in significance.

    Sterling argues that the most famous buildings of the mid-21st century will be older buildings, preserved in new ways, and retrofitted for new uses.

    He dismisses artificial intelligence design as “a kaleidoscope,” providing options without insight.

    He discusses Ikea’s Space10 research on autonomous food trucks, predicting that spaces will become mobile in the 21st century. He anticipates that the impact of autonomous cars will be profound: the autonomous car is regular car as the cell phone is to the landline.

    Though he admits that, since Jonathan Swift’s Laputa, there has always been something ridiculous about the idea of flying cities, they might become an option if Earth’s surface becomes too polluted or dangerous.

    Sterling argues that when space travel becomes feasible and cheap, the moon, planets and asteroids will be settled, but out of a sense of “cosmic Weltschmerz.”

    Showing an image of the recent L.A. Forum Reader, he reminds the audience that thirty years isn’t that far off.

    Sterling concludes with a discussion of some of his current projects in Turin: the Casa Jasmina, The Share Festival, and – unexpectedly – the Villa Abegg, where he works on a novel in an Eames lounge chair.

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. Made in Space 2017 | Talk: The Pattern Web

    Rewatch the full talk "The Pattern Web" from Made in Space 2017.

    For the last few years, WikiHouse Foundation have been developing open source technologies to digitise and democratise the way we make homes. In this talk, Alastair shares WikiHouse Foundation’s vision for a new kind of digital civic infrastructure, one they believe has the potential to transform the way we design, make and learn from the physical world around us.

    With Alastair Parvin.

    ===
    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W2a997qwJSU
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Thu, 24 Aug 2017 17:28:14 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. 265- The Pool and the Stream | 99% Invisible

    This is the story of a curvy, kidney-shaped swimming pool born in Northern Europe that had a huge ripple effect on popular culture in Southern California and landscape architecture in Northern California, and then the world. A documentary in three parts by Avery Trufelman.

    http://99percentinvisible.prx.org/2017/07/04/265-the-pool-and-the-stream/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. Patterns Day: Paul Lloyd

    Paul Lloyd speaking at Patterns Day in Brighton on June 30, 2017.

    A one-day event for web designers and developers on design systems, pattern libraries, style guides, and components.

    Patterns Day is brought to you by Clearleft.

    https://patternsday.com/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. New York City History: The Bowery Boys : #227 The Hindenburg Over New York

    On the afternoon of May 6, 1937, New Yorkers looked overhead at an astonishing sight — the arrival of the Hindenburg, the largest airship in the world, drifting calmly across the sky. 

    New York City was already in the throes of "Zeppelin mania" by then. These rigid gas-filled airships, largely manufactured by Germany, were experiencing a Jazz Age rediscovery thanks in part to the Graf Zeppelin, a glamorous commercial airship which first crossed the ocean in 1928. Its commander and crew even received two ticker-tape parades through lower Manhattan.

    In size and prominence, the Hindenburg would prove to be the greatest airship of all. It was the Concorde of its day, providing luxurious transatlantic travel for the rich and famous. In Germany, the airship was used as a literal propaganda machine for the rising Nazi government of Adolf Hitler.

    But dreams of Zeppelin-filled skies were quickly vanquished in the early evening hours of May 6, 1937, over a landing field in Lakehurst, New Jersey. Its destruction would be one of the most widely seen disasters in the world, marking an end to this particular vision of the future.

    But a mark of the Zeppelin age still exists on the New York City skyline, atop the city’s most famous building!

    http://boweryboys.libsyn.com/227-the-hindenburg-over-new-york

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. The Big Web Show #142: Information Architecture is Still Very Much a Thing, with Abby Covert

    Jeffrey Zeldman’s guest is Abby Covert, Information Architect; curator of IA Summit; co-founder of World IA Day; president of IA Institute; teacher in the Products of Design MFA program at New York’s School of Visual Arts; and author of How To Make Sense

    http://5by5.tv/bigwebshow/142

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  8. 99% Invisible Episode 172: On Location

    So many classic movies have been made in downtown Los Angeles. Though many don’t actually take place in downtown Los Angeles.

    L.A. has played almost every city in the world, thanks to its diverse landscape and architectural variety, but particular buildings just keep coming back on screen again and again. The Bradbury Building, for instance, is arguably the biggest architectural movie star in all of Los Angeles.

    http://99percentinvisible.org/episode/on-location/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  9. 99% Invisible 147: Penn Station Sucks

    New Yorkers are known to disagree about a lot of things. Who’s got the best pizza? What’s the fastest subway route? Yankees or Mets? But all 8.5 million New Yorkers are likely to agree on one thing: Penn Station sucks.

    There is nothing joyful about Penn Station. It is windowless, airless, and crowded. 650,000 people suffer through Penn Station on a their daily commute—more traffic than all of three the New York area’s major airport hubs combined.

    http://99percentinvisible.org/episode/penn-station-sucks/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

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