adactio / tags / ai

Tagged with “ai” (226)

  1. The Box That AI Lives In

    How could an 18th-century robot win at chess? By using a trick that big tech firms still pull on us today.

    In the new podcast The Secret History of the Future, from Slate and the Economist: Examine the history of tech to uncover stories that help us illuminate the present and predict the future. From the world’s first cyberattack in 1834 to 19th-century virtual reality, the Economist’s Tom Standage and Slate’s Seth Stevenson find the ancient ingenuity that our modern digital technology can learn from and expose age-old weaknesses we are already on a course to repeat.

    In the first episode: An 18th-century device called the Mechanical Turk convinced Europeans that a robot could play winning chess. But there was a trick. It’s a trick that companies like Amazon, Google, and Facebook still pull on us today. Guests include futurist Jaron Lanier and Luis von Ahn, founder of CAPTCHA and Duolingo.

    http://www.slate.com/articles/podcasts/secret_history_of_the_future/2018/09/a_200_year_old_chess_playing_robot_explains_the_internet.html

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. The Saint Helena Submarine Plot (Entry 1096.PS7719)

    In which Napoleon Bonaparte is disrespected by John’s mom, but almost rescued by an English smuggler in a steampunk submarine.

    https://www.omnibusproject.com/podcasts/the-saint-helena-submarine-plot-entry-1096ps7719.htm

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. Shipping: The ‘Invisible Industry’ That Clothes And Feeds You

    Imagine a ship carrying goods in containers that, if lined up, would stretch around 11,000 miles long, or nearly halfway around the planet. Rose George spent several weeks aboard one such ship as research for her new book, Ninety Percent of Everything: Inside Shipping, the Invisible Industry That Puts Clothes on Your Back, Gas in Your Car and Food on Your Plate.

    She writes, "There are more than one hundred thousand ships at sea carrying all the solids, liquids and gases that we need to live." Yet, because we’re on land, they’re out of sight. Even people who make a point of ethical eating and shopping are usually unaware of the often poor working conditions for seafarers on these ships.

    George’s previous book, The Big Necessity, was about another subject that is largely out of sight: where human waste goes after you flush the toilet, and what happens in regions that don’t have plumbing. She tells Fresh Air’s Terry Gross about who invented the shipping container and how the shipping industry affects ocean life.

    https://www.npr.org/2013/08/14/211981786/shipping-the-invisible-industry-that-clothes-and-feeds-you

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. Assistive technology: Where are we going?

    Peter heads to a Microsoft research centre to look at the latest in assistive technology.

    The lives of blind and visually-impaired people are being transformed by technology. But where are the changes heading? Peter White is joined by YouTuber Lucy Edwards as they head to a Microsoft research centre, to get her take on life as a digital native. As a blind person, what does she want from the technology that’s around the corner?

    Microsoft’s "Senior Technology Evangelist" Hector Minto explains his job title - and takes Peter and Lucy through some of the tools of their "Seeing AI" app. He addresses their questions about the current state of technology which is for, and increasingly designed by, the blind and visually impaired.

    We also hear from Saqib Shaikh, who was a driving force behind Microsoft’s approach to technology for the blind and VI and from Dave Williams, who trains people to use assistive technology.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b0b85m67

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. Ep 223 Fair Plé to the “Lovely Girls” of Trad & Folk Music

    Waking the Feminists shone a light on the representation of women in Irish theatre. Now, women in Irish traditional and folk music are trying to address the gender imbalance across their sector through the Fair Plé initiative. It began with a meeting at the Cobblestone pub in Dublin and two of the women who were there that night – harpist Una Monaghan and singer Pauline Scanlon –speak to Róisín Ingle on today’s podcast and perform the song My Dearest Dear. This Saturday Fair Plé events are taking place around the world as part of a day of action, ahead of a showcase event at the Cork Midsummer Festival on June 16.

    For more information go to www.fairple.com

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    Original video: https://soundcloud.com/irishtimes-women/womens-podcast-7th-june-2018
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Mon, 25 Jun 2018 13:48:43 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. 99% Invisible: Ten Thousand Years

    https://99percentinvisible.org/episode/ten-thousand-years/

    In 1990, the federal government invited a group of geologists, linguists, astrophysicists, architects, artists, and writers to the New Mexico desert, to visit the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. They would be there on assignment.

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is the nation’s only permanent underground repository for nuclear waste. Radioactive byproducts from nuclear weapons manufacturing and nuclear power plants. WIPP was designed not only to handle a waste stream of various forms of nuclear sludge, but also more mundane things that interacted with radioactive materials, such as tools and gloves.

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. Hobby Horse Episode 11: Andy Baio has been eaten by a grue

    Andy Baio and his love of the text adventure.

    Andy Baio is a veteran of the early web, creator of waxy.org, upcoming.org, and playfic.com. He was the first CTO for Kickstarter and went on to create the XOXO Festival in Portland Oregon.

    He’s also into collecting original 1980s Infocom games and still plays them today despite owning modern computers and video cards that can do so much more.

    http://the.hobbyhorse.club/11

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  8. 005: Jason Kottke and Twenty Years of kottke.org

    Kottke.org is a website. It is not an app. It is not a product. It is simply a static website, updated daily, running some rickety old blogging software. As of March of 2018 it’s been consistently updated for twenty years. It is largely the product of a single mind: Jason Kottke. Kottke.org has shaped the way many of us have thought about news, blogging, and linking. On Margins talks with Jason about his two decades of blogging, influences in his life that shaped how he works today, and what kottke.org would look like were it a book.

    https://craigmod.com/onmargins/005/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  9. Claire Evans – Mother Internet

    Technology writer Claire Evans talks about her new book “Broad Band: The Untold Story of Women Who Made the Internet.”

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    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PEHlRqdohY8
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Tue, 17 Apr 2018 19:04:07 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  10. Track Changes: Who Really Made The Internet?: Claire L. Evans on Tech History

    How did cyberpunks and activists affect the tech industry? Do we understand the history of the internet? How much of what we know comes only from a man’s perspective? This week, Claire L. Evans tells us about her new book, Broad Band, and the women who created the internet.

    There Were Women In The Room: This week Paul Ford and Gina Trapani sit down with Claire L. Evans to chat about her new book,

    Broad Band: The Untold Story of the Women Who Made the Internet. We discuss the impact of online communities, how weird the dot-com era was, and the stories of the women who made things work. We also get a window into Y△CHT’s future project — the Broad Band Musical!

    2:29 — Claire: “[This book is] a corrective if you will, of all the books we’ve all read and love about Silicon Valley, and the garage-to-riches stories of entrepreneurship… These are the stories about the women who were in the room the whole time, and nobody asked about them.”

    5:06 — Paul: “Women get forgotten from activist histories too, and it was kind of an activist scene in the early days.”

    5:22 — Gina: “Weird was welcome, in a way that is no longer the case.”

    7:03 — Claire: “My big takeaway is how little we value long-term care and maintenance when it comes to building things… I profile Stacy Horn, who founded Echo BBS in the late 90s. It still exists. And she has devoted 25 years of her life to fostering and caring for this community. … She’s taking care of something, because she’s responsible for a community, and I think that’s really beautiful.”

    8:24— Claire: “We mythologize the box, but it’s the users that change the world; it’s what you do with it. The culture work, the development of making things worth linking is almost as important as making the conventions for linking.

    8:24 — Gina: “It’s broadening the definition of what making the web was. It wasn’t just about standardizing protocols and running code, it was about building the places where people wanted to come and connect and share.”

    9:07— Paul: “Moderation…it’s critical, it’s key to these communities but it doesn’t get as much appreciation as ‘I wrote a page of code.’”

    20:51 — Claire: “We’re all very siloed in the contemporary media landscape.”

    http://trackchanges.libsyn.com/who-really-made-the-internet-claire-l-evans-on-techhistory

    —Huffduffed by adactio

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