adactio / tags / africa

Tagged with “africa” (7)

  1. Nnedi Okorafor: Sci-fi stories that imagine a future Africa | TED Talk

    "My science fiction has different ancestors — African ones," says writer Nnedi Okorafor. In between excerpts from her "Binti" series and her novel "Lagoon," Okorafor discusses the inspiration and roots of her work — and how she opens strange doors through her Afrofuturist writing.

    https://www.ted.com/talks/nnedi_okorafor_sci_fi_stories_that_imagine_a_future_africa

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie: The danger of a single story | TED Talk

    Our lives, our cultures, are composed of many overlapping stories. Novelist Chimamanda Adichie tells the story of how she found her authentic cultural voice — and warns that if we hear only a single story about another person or country, we risk a critical misunderstanding.

    https://www.ted.com/talks/chimamanda_ngozi_adichie_the_danger_of_a_single_story

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. A History of the World in 100 Objects: Olduvai Handaxe

    As early humans slowly began to move beyond their African homeland, they took with them one essential item - a handaxe. It is the most widely-used tool humans have created. Neil MacGregor, Director of the British Museum, sees just how vital to our evolution this sharp, ingenious implement was and how it allowed the spread of humans across the globe. Including contributions from designer Sir James Dyson and archaeologist Nick Ashton.

    From http://www.bbc.co.uk/podcasts/series/ahow

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. A History of the World in 100 Objects: Olduvai Stone Chopping Tool

    A simple chipped stone from the Rift Valley in Tanzania marks the emergence of modern humans. Faced with the needs to cut meat from carcasses, early humans in Africa discovered how to shape stones into cutting tools. From that one innovation, a whole history of human development springs. Neil MacGregor, Director of the British Museum, tells the story with contributions from flint napper Phil Harding, Sir David Attenborough and African Nobel Prize winner Dr Wangeri Maathai.

    From http://www.bbc.co.uk/podcasts/series/ahow

    —Huffduffed by adactio