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Tagged with “ada lovelace” (10)

  1. BBC Radio 4 - Great Lives, Series 31, Konnie Huq on Ada Lovelace

    Lord Byron’s only legitimate child is championed by Konnie Huq.

    From Banking, to air traffic control systems and to controlling the United States defence department there’s a computer language called ‘Ada’ - it’s named after Ada Lovelace - a 19th century mathematician and daughter of Lord Byron. Ada Lovelace is this week’s Great Life. She’s been called many things - but perhaps most poetically by Charles Babbage whom she worked with on a steam-driven calculating machine called the Difference Engine an ‘enchantress of numbers’, as her similarly mathematical mother had been called by Lord Byron a "princess of parallelograms". Augusta ‘Ada’ Byron was born in 1815 but her parents marriage was short and unhappy; they separated when Ada was one month old and she never saw her father , he died when was eight years old. Her mother, Annabella concerned Ada might inherit Byron’s "poetic tendencies" had her schooled her in maths and science to try to combat any madness inherited from her father. She’s championed by TV presenter and writer -Konnie Huq, most well known for presenting the BBC’s children’s programme - ‘Blue Peter’ and together with expert- Suw Charman- Anderson, a Social technologist, they lift the lid on the life of this mathematician, now regarded as the first computer programmer with presenter Matthew Parris.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b03b0ydy

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  2. Enchanting By Numbers (2015 version) | Benjamen Walker’s Theory of Everything

    We take another look at algorithms. Tim Hwang explains how Uber’s algorithms generate phantom cars and marketplace mirages. And we revisit our conversation with Christian Sandvig who, last year asked Facebook users to explain how they imagine the Edgerank algorithm works (this is the algorithm that powers Facebook’s news feed). Sandvig discovered that most of his subjects had no idea there even was an algorithm at work. Plus  James Essinger and Suw Charman-Anderson, tell us about Ada Lovelace, the woman who wrote the first computer program (or as James puts it – Algorithm)  in 1843.

    https://toe.prx.org/2015/10/enchanting-by-numbers-2015-version/

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  3. Enchanting By Numbers (2015 version) | Benjamen Walker’s Theory of Everything

    We take another look at algorithms. Tim Hwang explains how Uber’s algorithms generate phantom cars and marketplace mirages. And we revisit our conversation with Christian Sandvig who, last year asked Facebook users to explain how they imagine the Edgerank algorithm works (this is the algorithm that powers Facebook’s news feed). Sandvig discovered that most of his subjects had no idea there even was an algorithm at work. Plus  James Essinger and Suw Charman-Anderson, tell us about Ada Lovelace, the woman who wrote the first computer program (or as James puts it – Algorithm)  in 1843.

    https://toe.prx.org/2015/10/enchanting-by-numbers-2015-version/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. Dark Patterns and Ada Lovelace - Tech Weekly podcast | Technology | The Guardian

    How user interfaces are designed to trick us. Plus, the legacy of Victorian computing pioneer Ada Lovelace.

    Ever subscribed to a mailing list by mistake? Booked travel insurance without noticing? Then you’ve fallen for a Dark Pattern.

    This week on the podcast we investigate the murky world of Dark Patterns: user interfaces that use psychological techniques to trick us into doing things we might otherwise not do.

    And as a new exhibition dedicated to Ada Lovelace opens at the Science Museum, we find out why the Victorian computing whizz is the hottest ticket in town 200 years on.

    Nathalie Nahai is joined by digital product designer Cennydd Bowles, Channel 4 News tech journalist Geoff White, designer Dan Lockton and Science Museum curator Tilly Blyth.

    http://www.theguardian.com/technology/audio/2015/oct/22/dark-patterns-ada-lovelace-tech-podcast

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  5. A Point of View: Lisa Jardine: Machine Intelligence

    Weekly reflections on topical issues from a range of contributors including historian Lisa Jardine, novelist Sarah Dunant and writer Alain de Botton.

    Lisa Jardine compares the contributions of Ada Lovelace and Alan Turing a century later to computer science and contrasts their views on the potential of and limits to machine intelligence. Producer: Sheila Cook

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/podcasts/series/pov

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  6. In Our Time: Ada Lovelace

    Melvyn Bragg explores the life and achievements of Ada Lovelace, daughter of Byron and prophet of the computer age. With him to discuss the "enchantress of numbers" are Patricia Fara, Fellow of Clare College and an Affiliated Lecturer in the Department of the History and Philosophy of Science at Cambridge University; Doron Swade, Visiting Professor in the History of Computing at Portsmouth University and John Fuegi, Research Fellow in Media and Gender Studies at the Universities of Stanford and Maryland.

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  7. In Our Time: Ada Lovelace

    Melvyn Bragg explores the life and achievements of Ada Lovelace, daughter of Byron and prophet of the computer age. With him to discuss the "enchantress of numbers" are Patricia Fara, Fellow of Clare College and an Affiliated Lecturer in the Department of the History and Philosophy of Science at Cambridge University; Doron Swade, Visiting Professor in the History of Computing at Portsmouth University and John Fuegi, Research Fellow in Media and Gender Studies at the Universities of Stanford and Maryland.

    —Huffduffed by adactio