adactio / tags / 3d printing

Tagged with “3d printing” (7)

  1. dConstruct 2015: Carla Diana

    Carla answers Jeremy’s questions on product design, teaching, prototyping, and whether 3D printing has finally "arrived."

    http://2015.dconstruct.org/

    Carla Diana is a hybrid designer keenly focused on realising new visions for Smart Objects and the Internet of Things. In addition to her industry experience at some of the world’s top design firms, such as frog Design and Smart Design, Carla maintains strategic alliances with a number of academic research groups. She is a member of the Georgia Tech Socially Intelligent Machines Lab, and a faculty member at the School of Visual Arts and the University of Pennsylvania’s Integrated Product Design Program, where she developed the first course on Smart Objects. She is Advisor for the group Tomorrow-Lab, a young design firm that creates electro-mechanical solutions for smart devices and she continues work as a Fellow at Smart Design, where she oversees the Smart Interaction Lab.

    Carla’s recent article, “Talking, Walking Objects”, appeared on the cover of the New York Times Sunday Review in January 2013, and is a good representation of her view of our robotic future. She has just completed a children’s book for Maker Media about the future of 3D printing and design entitled LEO the Maker Prince.

    http://2015.dconstruct.org/speaker/carla-diana

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  2. Chris Anderson: The Makers Revolution - The Long Now

    We’re now entering the third industrial revolution, Anderson said. The first one, which began with the spinning jenny in 1776, doubled the human life span and set population soaring. From the demographic perspective, "it’s as if nothing happened before the Industrial Revolution."

    The next revolution was digital. Formerly industrial processes like printing were democratized with desktop publishing. The "cognitive surplus" of formerly passive consumers was released into an endless variety of personal creativity. Then distribution was democratized by the Web, which is "scale agnostic and credentials agnostic." Anyone can potentially reach 7 billion people.

    The third revolution is digital manufacturing, which combines the gains of the first two revolutions. Factory robots, which anyone can hire, have become general purpose and extremely fast. They allow "lights-out manufacturing," that goes all night and all weekend.

    "This will reverse the arrow of globalization," Anderson said. "The centuries of quest for cheaper labor is over. Labor arbitrage no longer drives trade." The advantages of speed and flexibility give the advantage to "locavore" manufacturing because "Closer is faster." Innovation is released from the dead weight of large-batch commitments. Designers now can sit next to the robots building their designs and make adjustments in real time.

    Thus the Makers Movement. Since 2006, Maker Faires, Hackerspaces, and TechShops (equipped with laser cutters, 3D printers, and CAD design software) have proliferated in the US and around the world. Anderson said he got chills when, with the free CAD program Autodesk 123D, he finished designing an object and moused up to click the button that used to say "Print." This one said "Make." A 3D printer commenced building his design.

    Playing with Minecraft, "kids are becoming fluent in polygons." With programs like 123D Catch you can take a series of photos with your iPhone of any object, and the software will create a computer model of it. "There is no copyright on physical stuff," Anderson pointed out. The slogan that liberated music was "Rip. Mix. Burn." The new slogan is "Rip. Mod. Make."

    I asked Anderson, "But isn’t this Makers thing kind of trivial, just trailing-edge innovation?" "That’s why it’s so powerful," Anderson said. "Remember how trivial the first personal computers seemed?"

    — by Stewart Brand

    http://longnow.org/seminars/02013/feb/19/makers-revolution/

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  3. Using 3-D Printers To Make Gun Parts Raises Alarms : All Tech Considered : NPR

    Owners of 3-D printers can create all sorts of imaginative items —€” cups, tools, jewelry. All they need is a design and the printer. But now some gun parts are being produced with this technology, alarming some in the burgeoning 3-D printing industry.

    http://www.npr.org/blogs/alltechconsidered/2013/02/06/171154845/using-3-d-printers-to-make-gun-parts-raises-alarms

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. Can 3D Printers Reshape The World?

    What if you needed a new toothbrush and all you had to do was hit print? What if doctors could print out transplantable organs and pastry chefs turned to a printer, not a kitchen, for their next creation? Ira Flatow and a panel of guests discuss 3D printing technology, how far it’s come and what a 3D-printed-future could look like.

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. Michael Weinberg on 3D Printing

    Michael Weinberg, staff attorney with Public Knowledge, discusses his white paper entitled, It Will Be Awesome If They Don’t Screw This Up: 3D Printing, Intellectual Property, and the Fight Over the Next Great Disruptive Technology. The discussion begins with Weinberg describing 3D printing: the process of printing three dimensional objects layer-by-layer from a digital file on a computer. According to Weinberg the design method used for printing includes programs like AutoCad and 3D scanners that can scan existing objects, making it possible to print a 3D replica. He goes on to explain why he thinks 3D printing, coupled with the Internet, is a disruptive technology. Finally, Weinberg discusses the thesis of his paper, where he anticipates industries affected by potential disruption will not compete with or adapt to this technology, but rather, will seek legal protection through IP law to preemptively regulate 3D printing.

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. The 3-D Printer - Future Tense - ABC Radio National (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

    3-D printing techniques offer a chance to make manufacturing more efficient and flexible, but as we’ll hear they also pose challenges to traditional labour relations and to intellectual property rights.

    Guests:
    Tom Standage, Digital Editor, The Economist
    Bre Pettis, Co-founder of Makerbot Industries
    Michael Weinberg. Staff Attorney, Public Knowledge
    Professor Berok Khoshnevis, Engineering, University of Southern California

    Further Information:
    Economist article on 3-D printing (http://www.economist.com/node/18114221)
    Makerbot Industries website (http://www.makerbot.com/)
    Thingiverse website (http://www.thingiverse.com/)
    Centre for Rapid Automotated Fabrication Technologies (http://craft.usc.edu/Mission.html)
    Behrokh Khoshnevis profile (http://www-bcf.usc.edu/~khoshnev/)
    Public Knowledge website (http://www.publicknowledge.org/)
    Public Knowledge resources on 3D printing (http://www.publicknowledge.org/3d-printing-bits-atoms)

    http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/futuretense/the-3-d-printer/3667402

    —Huffduffed by adactio