Tagged with “networks” (29)

  1. Humans Are Only a Self-driving Car’s Way of Making Another Self-driving Car

    Over 10,000 years ago we lived in balance with the network. Since then we’ve tried to control, rule and bend it to our whims. In all that time, we’ve never asked ourselves if we’re building something that controls us?

    http://2014.dconstruct.org/conference/briansuda/

    Brian Suda is an informatician, which is definitely a real word and not just something he made up once. It is perfectly cromulent.

    Brian lives and works in Reykjavík by way of Edinburgh by way of St. Louis. He’s been living in Iceland long enough that he can correctly pronounce Eyjafjallajökull. That’s quite an impressive party trick …unless the party is in Iceland.

    Brian is a data hound, moving from project to project, always finding interesting ways to expose and represent the data exhaust of our network engine. He built one of the earliest microformats parsers and has written a book on Designing With Data.

    Together with Aitor Garcia, Brian has formed Analog. Their first project involves the production of Kickstarter-funded notebooks beautifully embossed with geographical data.

    At some point, he plans to graph all the world‘s baked goods on a hypercube of bread.

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  2. Tethering the Hovercraft

    A careen through grassroots innovation, speculative design, supply chains and sexual healthcare provision, lashing down over-caffeinated flailing into the grit of socio-technical systems.

    http://2014.dconstruct.org/conference/georginavoss/

    Georgina Voss is a writer and researcher working on the interplay of technology, politics and culture. She sometimes writes for The Guardian, and she’s currently in residence at the lovely Lighthouse Arts right here in Brighton working on a design fiction project that asks “what could digital fabrication and hyper-local manufacturing offer to the provision of sexual healthcare?”

    She also holds a doctorate from Sussex Uni, so that’s Doctor Georgina Voss to you.

    George has a knack for exposing the networks underlying the most normal-seeming activities. Usually “logistics” isn’t a word that conjures up much excitement, but George can make you look at shipping containers in a whole new light.

    Oh, and she also hosts a great podcast called Gin and Innovation which has featured dConstruct alumni Dan Williams and James Bridle.

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  3. A Cunning Plan

    Inventing the next twenty years, strategic foresight, fictional futurism and English rural magic: Warren Ellis attempts to convince you that they are all pretty much the same thing, and why it was very important that some people used to stalk around village hedgerows at night wearing iron goggles.

    http://2014.dconstruct.org/conference/warrenellis/

    Warren Ellis is a writer. He is not the violinist in the Bad Seeds.

    Some of the things he has written have pictures in them, like Transmetropolitan, Planetary, and The Authority. Some of the things he has written are constructed entirely from words, like Crooked Little Vein and the best-selling Gun Machine.

    Gun Machine is currently being developed for television. His book Red was adapted for the big screen in 2010. We shan’t hold it against him.

    You can find him on Twitter, on Tumblr, on This Is My Jam, and you used to be able to find him in Second Life, but most importantly, he has his own website because he’s down with the Indie Web.

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  4. Social Network Portability — dConstruct Audio Archive

    Why is it that every single social network community site makes you re-enter all your personal profile info (name, email, birthday, URL etc.) and re-add all your friends? With new social networks being launched nearly every week, the problem of social network fatigue has gone from being a geeky early adopter problem to being much more widespread.

    http://archive.dconstruct.org/2008/socialnetworkportability

    —Huffduffed by wolverina

  5. Unexpected Item In The Bagging Area

    In the 1980s geophysicist Andy Hildebrand was working for Exxon analysing seismic survey data. Hildebrand created digital signal processing software that took recordings of waves travelling through the ground from dynamite explosions and processed them to find hidden pockets of oil.

    In 2013 the software has a new name and a very different purpose. You can hear its output on the radio, on YouTube and on X-Factor. No longer a tool for geophysicists but for pop stars. Auto-Tune uses the same process that identified underground rock layers to make vocals sound pitch perfect. To an algorithm there is no difference between Kanye’s voice and an oil deposit.

    Auto-Tune isn’t the only technology shaping our lives in unexpected ways. In this talk we’ll look at our software mediated world, it’s consequences and our role in it as creators.

    http://2013.dconstruct.org/conference/dan/

    Dan W. makes things. Sometimes those things are made of atoms. Sometimes they are made of bits.

    Display Cabinet is a mixture of both. And even the purely digital services Arrivals and When Should I Visit? are designed to make smooth your journey through the world of atoms and matter by giving you easy access to information from the networked world of bits.

    Dan works at Pervasive Media Studio in Bristol. You can find his scrapbook on Tumblr where he documents the seemingly science-fictional collisions of technology and society that he sees happening all around.

    —Huffduffed by iamdanw

  6. Admiral Shovel and the Toilet Roll — dConstruct Audio Archive

    It begins to look as if we might have been wrong. All those predictions driving us forward throughout history have brought us finally to the unexpected realisation that the future is, suddenly, no longer what it used to be. Oops.

    http://archive.dconstruct.org/2012/admiralshovel

    —Huffduffed by boxman

  7. Beyond Mobile: Making Sense of a Post-PC World

    Native applications are a remnant of the Jurassic period of computer history. We will look back on these past 10 years as the time we finally grew out of our desktop mindset and started down the path of writing apps for an infinite number of platforms. As the cost of computation and connectivity plummets, manufacturers are going to put ‘interactivity’ into every device. Some of this will be trivial: my power adaptor knows it’s charging history. Some of it will be control related: my television will be grand central for my smart home. But at it’s heart, we’ll be swimming in world where every device will have ‘an app’. What will it take for us to get here, what technologies will it take to make this happen?

    This talk will discuss how the principles of the open web must apply not only to prototocols but to hardware as well. How can we build a ‘DNS for hardware’ so the menagerie of devices has a chance for working together?

    http://2012.dconstruct.org/conference/jenson/

    Scott Jenson used to work at Apple, developing the Human Interface guidelines and working on the Newton, no less. He also worked at Symbian and Google so he knows all about mobile devices of all kinds.

    Scott is currently Creative Director at Frog Design where he has been writing about the coming zombie apocalypse.

    —Huffduffed by jane

  8. The Man Working To Reverse-Engineer Your Brain

    Our brains are filled with billions of neurons. Neuroscientist Sebastian Seung explains how mapping out the connections between those neurons might be the key to understanding the basis of things like personality, memory, perception, ideas and mental illness.

    http://www.npr.org/2012/02/29/147190092/the-man-working-to-reverse-engineer-your-brain

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  9. Jeremy Rifkin: How Lateral Power is Transforming Energy, the Economy, and the World.

    Economist and trend-spotter Jeremy Rifkin predicts that the evolution of energy production and distribution — from fossil fuels to more decentralized renewable energy — will transform the global economy. He joins us to discuss his latest book, "The Third Industrial Revolution: How Lateral Power is Transforming Energy, the Economy, and the World."

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  10. Why Cities Keep Growing, Corporations and People Always Die, and Life Gets Faster

    From edge.org: http://edge.org/conversation/geoffrey-west

    For the past few years Geoffrey West, a physicist former president of SantaFe Institute has been calling for "a science of how city growth affects society and environment".

    After years of focusing on scalability of cities and urban environments, West, is now is bringing "some of the powerful techniques, ideas, and paradigms developed in physics over into the biological and social sciences". He is looking at a bigger picture and asking the following question: "to what extent can biology and social organization (which are both quintessential complex adaptive systems) be put in a more quantitative, analytic, mathemitizable, predictive framework so that we can understand them in the way that we understand ‘simple physical systems’?’

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

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