Tagged with “earth” (20)

  1. New Yorker: Why Do You Want to Go to Mars?

    Elon Musk has described the colonization of Mars as a planetary “insurance policy.” If we’re going to trash Earth, we’ll need somewhere else to go. The New Yorker’s archive editor, Joshua Rothman, is a lifelong science-fiction fan who has often fantasized about going to the red planet. He speaks with Elizabeth Kolbert, a New Yorker staff writer who is against the galactic-colonization plan, and Jacob Haqq-Misra, a scientist who writes about what the political landscape of an inhabited Mars might look like.

    http://www.wnyc.org/story/why-do-you-want-go-mars/

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  2. Hippy Internet - The Whole Earth Catalog

    Sukhdev Sandhu travels to the epicentres of countercultural America in Woodstock and San Francisco to tell the story of a book of hippy philosophy that defined the 1960s and intimated how the internet would grow long before the web arrived. With Luc Sante, Eliot Weinberger, Kenneth Goldsmith, Ed Sanders, Lois Britton, and Fred Turner Producer: Tim Dee.

    —Huffduffed by briansuda

  3. BBC Discovery: Beyond the Abyss

    Rebecca Morelle talks to explorers of deep ocean trenches, from film-maker James Cameron to biologists discovering dark realms of weird pink gelatinous fish and gigantic crustaceans.

    The deepest regions of the ocean lie between 6,000 and 11,000 metres. Oceanographers term this the Hadal Zone. It exists where the floor of abyss plunges into long trough-like features, known as ocean trenches. The Hadal zone is the final frontier of exploration and ecological science on the planet.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p026q0yf

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  4. Little Atoms 339 – Gaia Vince & Adventures in the Anthropocene

    Gaia Vince is a journalist and broadcaster specialising in science and the environment. She has been the front editor of the journal Nature Climate Change, the news editor of Nature and online editor of New Scientist. Her work has appeared in the Guardian, The Times, Science, Scientific American, Australian Geographic and the Australian. She has a regular column, Smart Planet, on BBC Online, and devises and presents programmes about the Anthropocene for BBC radio. Her first book is Adventures in the Anthropocene: A Journey to the Heart of the Planet We Made.

    http://www.sidrodrigues.com/2014/08/little-atoms-339-gaia-vince-adventures-anthropocene/

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  5. Crowded Planet: A Conversation with Alan Weisman

    Over the course of the past one hundred years, we humans have grown in population at a rate rarely seen outside of a petri dish. Alan Weisman, author of the best-selling The World Without Us, spent two years traveling to twenty nations to investigate what this population explosion means for our species as well as those we share the planet with—and, most importantly, what we can do about it. His book Countdown: Our Last, Best Hope for a Future on Earth? will be released later this month. Orion managing editor Andrew D. Blechman met with Alan at his home in rural Massachusetts, amid birdsong and the patter of rainfall, to discuss some of the most serious issues ever to face the human species.

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  6. BBC Discovery: A Trip Around Mars with Kevin Fong - Part One

    The planet Mars boasts the most dramatic landscapes in our solar system. Kevin Fong embarks on a grand tour around the planet with scientists, artists and writers who know its special places intimately- through their probes, roving robots and imaginations. This first part of the journey includes Mars’ gargantuan volcanoes, an extreme version of Earth’s Grand Canyon and the cratered Southern Highlands where future explorers might find safety from the Red Planet’s deadly radiation environment.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p0175w4h

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  7. Off earth mining and galactic gas stations - Future Tense - ABC Radio National (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

    Rick Tumlinson is a US businessman whose ambition is to mine asteroids and to then use the material he extracts to power spacecraft and satellites. He talks of developing galactic "€˜gas stations"€™.

    http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/futuretense/off-earth-mining-and-galactic-gas-stations/4553376

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  8. Future Tense: What’s left to explore?

    In the age of Google Earth are there places in the world left to explore? That’s the question journalist Andrew Dodd set out to answer!

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  9. Nature: The original computer whizz

    Alan Turing is sometimes called ‘the founder of computer science’. To celebrate the 100th anniversary of his birth, Charlotte Stoddart went to Oxford to meet his biographer, physicist Andrew Hodges. In this podcast, they talk about Turing’s famous 1936 paper on computable numbers, his contribution to cracking the German Enigma ciphers, and his thoughts on machine intelligence. http://www.nature.com/nature/podcast/index-turing-2012-02-23.html

    —Huffduffed by kevinmarks

  10. The Breathtaking Power And Beauty Of The Sun

    We know our sun is vast and blazing. But sometimes it’s blazing more aggressively than others. Positively storming. Last week, the largest solar storm in almost a decade boomed out with a wave of cosmic energy across the 93 million miles to Earth. And we got hit.

    Superheated gas hurling waves of particles off the sun. Slamming Earth’s magnetic field. Threatening power grids, orbiting satellites, GPS signals, airline flights, radio communications. And making some amazing Northern Lights.

    This hour, On Point: Heading into storm season on the sun.

    http://onpoint.wbur.org/2012/01/30/sun

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

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