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adactio / collective

There are thirty-eight people in adactio’s collective.

Huffduffed (4797)

  1. A Speck of Dust

    Jay Owens argues that dust is a lot more interesting than we think, and we ought to pay more attention to it.

    Jay has spent years researching dust, and produces a popular newsletter on the subject. In this fascinating Four Thought, recorded at the Design Museum in London, she shares some stories from the field of dust research that up until now have only been known to other ‘dust people’, as she calls her fellow dust researchers.

    Producer: Giles Edwards.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b08mbjqp

    —Huffduffed by iamdanw

  2. Power Rangers: Haim Saban

    As a refugee growing up in Tel Aviv, Haim Saban remembers not having enough money to eat. As an adult, he hustled his way into the entertainment business, writing theme songs for classic cartoons like Inspector Gadget and Heathcliff. But producing the mega-hit Mighty Morphin Power Rangers put him on track to becoming a billionaire media titan.

    —Huffduffed by briansuda

  3. The Future of Emotional Machines - SXSW 2017

    Imagine a stuffed animal that alters its behavior in response to a child’s emotional state, a commercial that changes based on a customer’s facial expression, or a device that can actually create feelings as though you were experiencing them naturally. This is the next giant step in the relationship between humans and technology: emotionally aware computers and social robots that recognize, respond to, and even influence our emotions. Because emotion is such a core aspect of who we are, these technologies will eventually be able to respond to our needs before we’re even aware of them ourselves. But how will they change us and what will be the unintended consequences of emotional machines?

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    Original video: https://soundcloud.com/officialsxsw/the-future-of-emotional-machines-sxsw-2017?in=clampants/sets/sxsw
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Wed, 19 Apr 2017 12:31:08 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  4. Iceland’s Triumph

    No nation fell as far during the 2008 global financial crisis as Iceland. But unlike other countries Iceland decided to hold those responsible for the crash to account. Now, nine years on, the country has recovered. What can other nations learn from Iceland’s actions?

    —Huffduffed by briansuda

  5. The Entrepreneurs: Eureka 43: Urbanito

    Eureka 43: Urbanito: Simon and Elaine MacKenzie are the husband-and-wife team behind new family-friendly city-guide brand Urbanito. While travelling with their children the Scottish duo discovered a lack of smart and stylish travel guides that catered to curious kids as well as their parents – so they decided to make one themselves. They share their story.

    —Huffduffed by briansuda

  6. The most robot-proof job of them all

    Five years ago, Marketplace explored how machines, robots and software algorithms were increasingly entering the workforce in our series "Robots Ate My Job." Now, we’re looking at what humans can do about it with a new journey to find robot-proof jobs.

    The way the Trump administration sees it, the move to harden our borders is about national security and preserving jobs in the U.S. But moving forward, the real competition for work may come from machines, software and robots. Some jobs will be replaced, some jobs will be changed and some jobs will thrive.

    Dave Rollinson is in that third category. Five years ago, Rollinson was a graduate student at Carnegie Mellon University studying snake robots used for search and rescue. Now he’s a co-founder of HEBI Robotics, a startup that makes electronic building blocks that serve as the shoulder, elbow or knee of almost any robot someone might construct.

    "We were kind of inspired by Lego," Rollinson said. "We want to get to the point where people can put these together as easily and intuitively as Lego." If HEBI can manage to do that, there could be a big payoff. But for now, his No. 1 worry is finding people with the right skills to hire.

    "You’ve whittled your set down to probably, like, a handful of people in the world that can really do what it is that you’re trying to do," Rollinson said. "It’s probably our No. 1 concern as we grow is just finding the right people." Across town, at Rollinson’s alma mater, they see it this way, too.

    RELATED: Say hello to your robot co-worker Trump keeps talking about trade but he should be talking robots "This is the real concern," said David Bourne, principal systems scientist at CMU’s Robotics Institute. "It’s not what jobs robots are going to steal, it’s that people aren’t going to be ready to do the jobs that they need to do."

    Bourne said the bottleneck might be lack of faculty. Many potential teachers with robotics skills are being swallowed up by private companies, like Uber, which hired away four CMU professors and 36 researchers to work on its self-driving cars.

    "Just to give you an example, in one of our programs, we had 600 applications and there were 40 spots," Bourne said. "That should give you pause. You know, there’s a lot of people that can’t do the field they want to do."

    Anca Dragan is one of those select few who can. Originally from Romania, she earned a graduate degree from Carnegie Mellon’s robotics program and now researches the interaction between humans and robots at University of California, Berkeley.

    "It was just what I was passionate about. I loved math and I did math competitions," Dragan said. "I was raised in a country where math is, like, our national sport." Her early inspiration was a book on artificial intelligence that she came across in high school, co-authored by Berkeley professor Stuart Russell.

    "Now, I get to be a colleague of Stuart’s, and he’s just a few offices away," she said. "It’s really interesting to think of where I was in 12th grade and sort of the luck that I have now."

    "Luck” in the sense that you make your own luck, but also the luck of being born in Romania, a country that honors math and science achievements. The question is can the U.S. change its culture and rewire its economy to make these skills available to the many, rather than the few?

    —Huffduffed by briansuda

  7. Presentable #22: Jessica Hische Is Good at Freelancing - Relay FM

    This week, one of the best letterers and illustrators in the industry, Jessica Hische, joins the show. We discuss the thrills and anxieties of making a living as a freelancer.

    https://www.relay.fm/presentable/22

    —Huffduffed by mathowie

  8. 48: Progressive Enhancement | With Aaron Gustafson

    In this episode we talk about the Progressive Enhancement approach to web design and development with Aaron Gustafson. He talks us through some of the advantages of adopting Progressive Enhancement (PE) versus more traditional approaches. We also discuss barriers that might prevent us using PE and Aaron makes some useful recommendations.

    A much more in-depth discussion of the topic is available in Aaron’s book ‘Adaptive Web Design: Crafting Rich Experiences with Progressive Enhancement’.

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    Original video: https://soundcloud.com/relativepaths/48-progressive-enhancement-with-aaron-gustafson
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Fri, 14 Apr 2017 02:32:13 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by jgarber

  9. Reply All - #91 The Russian Passenger

    Somewhere in Russia, a man calls for a car. Somewhere in New York City, a stranger’s phone buzzes.

    Email us at replyall@gimletmedia.com and use the subject "theory" if you think you can provide us additional information.

    download

    Tagged with reply all

    —Huffduffed by jgarber

  10. Reply All - #93 Beware All

    This week, we discover who was actually behind the hack of Alex Blumberg’s Uber account. This episode picks up where Episode 91, The Russian Passenger, left off.

    download

    Tagged with reply all

    —Huffduffed by jgarber

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