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adactio / Jeremy Keith

An Irish web developer living in Brighton, England working with Clearleft.

I built Huffduffer.

There are thirty-eight people in adactio’s collective.

Huffduffed (3493)

  1. Jennifer Pahlka: Fixing Government: Bottom Up and Outside In - The Long Now

    Code for America was founded in 02009 by Jennifer Pahlka “to make government work better for the people and by the people in the 21st century.”

    The organization started a movement to modernize government for a digital age which has now spread from cities to counties to states, and now, most visibly, to the federal government, where Jennifer served at the White House as US Deputy Chief Technology Officer. There she helped start the United States Digital Service, known as "Obama’s stealth startup."

    Now that thousands of people from "metaphysical Silicon Valley" are working for and with government, what have we learned? Can government actually be fixed to serve citizens better—especially the neediest? Why does change in government happen so slowly?

    Before founding Code for America, Jennifer Pahlka co-created the Web 2.0 and Gov. 2.0 conferences, building on her prior experience organizing computer game developer conferences. She continues to serve as executive director of Code for America, which is based in San Francisco.

    http://longnow.org/seminars/02017/feb/01/fixing-government-bottom-and-outside/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. Episode 704: Open Office : Planet Money : NPR

    This episode is for everyone who’s ever had to ask their coworkers to quiet down or walk laps of the office to make a private phone call. Today on the show: We meet the man who stole your office door.

    http://www.npr.org/sections/money/2016/06/03/480625378/episode-704-open-office

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. 90 | Beyond the Chart with Brendan Dawes – Data Stories

    For our first episode of 2017 we had a very delightful chat with Brendan Dawes. Brendan is an artist and designer who works with interactive installations, data visualizations, and all things across the digital and physical sphere. He has a lot of super fascinating projects, including the famous Cinema Redux, an art piece that visualizes entire movies as a collection of snapshots.

    On the show we talk about his projects, his design process and philosophy, his relationship with the data visualization world, how he generates ideas, and his upcoming projects.

    We hope you enjoy this great conversation at the intersection of data, art, design, interaction and visualization!

    http://datastori.es/90-brendan-dawes/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. #150 Dark Patterns with Harry Brignull - UX Podcast

    Harry Brignull joins us to talk about “dark patterns”. Harry coined the phrase back in 2010 to describe the design patterns used on websites to deliberately trick us into doing something. We discuss some examples as well as the ethics behind implementing them and ask if “light patterns” exist. We talk about how dark patterns go beyond the web and into service design. Should we avoid using dark patterns in our designs? Well, we think yes – so in that case, how?

    http://uxpodcast.com/150-dark-patterns-harry-brignull/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. Are virtual personal assistants helping you live your life? Or intruding on it? MPR News with Tom Weber - MPR News

    Technology is embedded in our lives, but with convenience comes concerns about privacy. MPR News reporter Marianne Combs looked at how new technology is changing our relationships with corporations, and with each other. Joining her was Ben Sauer, a digital product designer and strategist at Clearleft and Cyborg Anthropologist Amber Case. Case studies the relationship between humans and technology.

    http://www.mprnews.org/podcasts/tom-weber

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. Variable Fonts — Responsive Web Design

    Variable fonts are coming. How will it change the web design and development process? Tim Brown and Bram Stein explain how variable fonts will work and what you can do with them now.

    https://responsivewebdesign.com/podcast/variable-fonts/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. UI Breakfast Podcast. Episode 47: Using Pattern Libraries in Web Design with Laura Elizabeth

    Pattern libraries can help you streamline the design process and build a flexible system (instead of static pages). Today we’re exploring this concept with Laura Elizabeth — a fantastic designer, writer, and speaker. You’ll learn how to plan and build a pattern library, how to document it, and how to make your clients fall in love with the result.

    Show Notes

    Double Your Freelancing — the website Laura is now redesigning with pattern libraries

    Design Academy — Laura’s design course for developers

    Style Tiles — another concept for web design process

    Styleguides.io — great collection of website style guides

    Episode 26: Bridging the Gap Between Designers and Developers with Roger Dudler

    — our episode with the founder of Frontify

    Laura’s official website

    Client Portal — Laura’s product that helps keep all client deliverables in one place (use your special promocode uibreakfast to get $100 off)

    Follow Laura on Twitter: @laurium

    http://uibreakfast.com/47-pattern-libraries-web-design-laura-elizabeth/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  8. 🎧 How to Become Batman | Invisibilia (NPR)

    The surprising effect that our expectations can have on the people around us. You’ll hear how people’s expectations can influence how well a rat runs a maze.

    http://boffosocko.com/2017/01/26/%f0%9f%8e%a7-how-to-become-batman-invisibilia-npr/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  9. Is it OK to build websites that require JavaScript? with Nolan Lawson on the Hanselminutes Technology Podcast: Fresh Air for Developers

    The Hanselminutes Podcast by Scott Hanselman

    Nolan Lawson sparked a niche debate with his statement "In 2016, it’s okay to build a website that doesn’t work without JavaScript." In this show Nolan explains what he meant by this, and dissects the concept of Progressive Enhancement in web apps today. Where will the next billion web surfers come from and what do their apps look like?

    http://hanselminutes.com/560/is-it-ok-to-build-websites-that-require-javascript-with-nolan-lawson

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  10. Preserving the Internet of the Past, Building the Internet of the Future | WCAI

    The internet is so ingrained in our daily lives, that it can be hard to remember life before it. And it changes so quickly it’s equally hard to know what the future might hold. One thing that’s clear is that more and more people will be connected and doing more and different things with this technology.

    It’s a bit tricky to pinpoint when the internet began. Was it the first email? The first public network? What we do know is exactly when we started keeping a record of what’s on the web - October 26, 1996.

    That’s the day Brewster Kahle launched Internet Archive. A computer engineer, internet activist, and digital librarian, Kahle draws inspiration from the Library of Congress and – further back – the great Library of Alexandria. Universal access to all knowledge is his ideal.

    As early as 1980, the idea that internet technology could make that possible was floating around the computer science community. As technology improved, the idea grew. By 1996, Kahle could archive every page from every website every two months.

    “It was kind of like what the search engines were doing,” he told WCAI. “Take a snapshot, and another snapshot, and another snapshot, and another snapshot, and we’ve been doing that for 20 years.”

    Twenty years of the web is a lot of data. The archive is currently 265 billion pages. Internet Archive also includes music, digitized books, and just about anything Kahle can legally get his hands on.

    “Whoever is going to be president in 20 years, we probably have her website [from] when she’s in high school,” he said.

    That may seem unnecessary, even unwelcome, to some. Kahle concedes there is plenty on the web that isn’t intended for posterity, and Internet Archive respects requests to have content removed. But he sees value in preserving web content that might be lost inadvertently.

    “Even though we use this metaphor of ‘page,’ which sounds like books, which sounds like permanent, it really isn’t,” he said. “The average life of a web page is only 100 days.”

    In the Internet Archive, those ephemeral pages become part of a permanent record of our collective internet experience. Browsing the Internet Archive, one lesson is immediately apparent – that experience has changed a lot in twenty years.

    http://capeandislands.org/post/preserving-internet-past-building-internet-future#stream/0

    —Huffduffed by adactio

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