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adactio / Jeremy Keith

An Irish web developer living in Brighton, England working with Clearleft.

I built Huffduffer.

There are thirty-eight people in adactio’s collective.

Huffduffed (3538)

  1. The Clock

    The clock was invented in 1656 and has become an essential part of the modern economy.

    There’s no such thing as “the correct time”. Like the value of money, it’s a convention that derives its usefulness from the widespread acceptance of others. But there is such a thing as accurate timekeeping. That dates from 1656, and a Dutchman named Christiaan Huygens. In the centuries since, as Tim Harford explains, the clock has become utterly essential to almost every area of the modern economy.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p04skkw4

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. Public key cryptography

    Geeks versus government – the story of public key cryptography.

    Take a very large prime number – one that is not divisible by anything other than itself. Then take another. Multiply them together. That is simple enough, and it gives you a very, very large “semi-prime” number. That is a number that is divisible only by two prime numbers. Now challenge someone else to take that semi-prime number, and figure out which two prime numbers were multiplied together to produce it. That, it turns out, is exceptionally hard. Some mathematics are a lot easier to perform in one direction than another. Public key cryptography works by exploiting this difference. And without it we would not have the internet as we know it. Tim Harford tells the story of public key cryptography – and the battle between the geeks who developed it, and the government which tried to control it.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p04vqrwy

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. Free Thinking Festival: Time, Space and Science

    Carlos Frenk, Eugenia Cheng, Jim Al-Khalili and Louisa Preston debate time and space.

    Carlos Frenk, Eugenia Cheng, Jim Al-Khalili and Louisa Preston debate time and space with presenter Rana Mitter and an audience at Radio 3’s Free Thinking Festival at Sage Gateshead.

    We can measure time passing but what actually is it? What do scientists mean when they suggest that time is an illusion. Can time exist in a black hole? Is everyone’s experience of time subjective? What is the connection between time and space? How does maths help us understand the universe?

    Professor Carlos Frenk is founding Director of the Institute for Computational Cosmology at Durham University and the winner of the Gold Medal of the Royal Astronomical Society in 2014.

    Dr Eugenia Cheng is Scientist in Residence at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and an Honorary Fellow of the University of Sheffield. She is trilingual, a concert-level classical pianist and the author of Beyond Infinity: An Expedition To The Outer Limits Of The Mathematical Universe.

    Jim Al-Khalili is Professor of Physics at the University of Surrey and presenter of BBC Radio 4’s The Life Scientific and TV documentaries. His books include Paradox: the Nine Greatest Enigmas in Science, Black Holes, Wormholes and Time Machines and Quantum: a Guide for the Perplexed.

    Dr Louisa Preston is a UK Space Agency Aurora Research Fellow. An astrobiologist, planetary geologist and author, she is based at Birkbeck, University of London. Her first book is Goldilocks and the Water Bears: the Search for Life in the Universe.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p04z7ws1

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. Radioactive Art

    Radioactive waste can remain dangerous to humans for 100,000 years. Nations with nuclear power are building underground storage facilities to permanently house it, but how might they mark these sites for future generations? The nuclear industry is turning to artists for creative solutions. How might artists create a warning that will still be understood and heeded so far into the future? Radioactive Art meets artists whose work deals with issues around nuclear legacy, and visits the nuclear agency in France that has sought their input.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p04vg4f2

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. Nukes - Radiolab

    President Richard Nixon once boasted that at any moment he could pick up a telephone and - in 20 minutes - kill 60 million people. Such is the power of the US President over the nation’s nuclear arsenal. But what if you were the military officer on the receiving end of that phone call? Could you refuse the order?

    This episode, we profile one Air Force Major who asked that question back in the 1970s and learn how the very act of asking it was so dangerous it derailed his career. We also pick up the question ourselves and pose it to veterans both high and low on the nuclear chain of command. Their responses reveal once and for all whether there are any legal checks and balances between us and a phone call for Armageddon.

    http://www.radiolab.org/story/nukes/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. A computer learns about ingredients and recipes

    Recommendation engines are everywhere. They let Netflix suggest shows you might want to watch. They let Spotify build you a personalised playlist of music you will probably like. They turn your smartphone into a source of endless hilarity and mirth. And, of course, there’s IBM’s Watson, recommending all sorts of “interesting” new recipes. As part of his PhD project on machine learning, Jaan Altosaar decided to use a new mathematical technique to build his own recipe recommendation engine.

    The technique is similar to the kind of natural language processing that powers predictive text on a phone, and one of the attractions of using food instead of English is that there are only 2000–3000 ingredients to worry about, instead of more than 150,000 words.

    The results so far are fun and intriguing, and can only get better.

    http://www.eatthispodcast.com/a-computer-learns-about-ingredients-and-recipes/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. Episode 03-Every Tuesday at Nine | shannonheatonmusic.com

    It’s Springtime in Boston. And this month’s episode is a fresh invitation to connect with people, and emerge from Winter!

    John Williams and Amy Shoemaker

    I chat with Tina Lech in Boston, John Williams in Chicago, Eoin O’Neill in Clare, and Brian Conway in White Plains, NY about the sessions they lead. I learn how each player runs these distinct weekly music gatherings–and what Irish music means to them, and the listeners who come each week.

    And trust me: whether you already play the accordion, or you’ve never been to an Irish session in your life, the story here goes way beyond a few tunes in a pub.

    I hope you’ll join me as I try to decode what sessions are all about. My conversations with the session leaders–and with Boston producer Brian O’Donovan, fiddle teacher Laurel Martin, and flute players Melissa Foster and Scott Boag opened my mind and my heart. There’s plenty of music heres, too.

    http://shannonheatonmusic.com/episode-03-every-tuesday-at-nine/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  8. 258: Design Ethics with Robyn Kanner and Mike Monteiro - ShopTalk

    We’ve got Robyn Kanner and Mike Monteiro on the show to talk about ethics in design. When and, more importantly, how should you stand up to a manager when they tell you to design something in a way that feels wrong? Where do ethics and morals collide and how do we navigate that?

    http://shoptalkshow.com/episodes/258-design-ethics-robyn-kanner-mike-monteiro/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  9. 5by5 | The Big Web Show #157: David Sleight, Design Director at ProPublica

    ProPublica (@ProPublica) design director David Sleight (@stuntbox) is Jeffrey Zeldman’s guest.

    How do publications brand themselves when a platform removes their fonts, art, and layout? What is “journalism in the public interest” and how does it differ from traditional reporting? What is bespoke web design and how does it work at ProPublica? What’s next for the ProPublica platform? How do newspapers retain readers in the age of AMP?

    ProPublica (“Journalism in the Public Interest”) was a recipient of the 2016 Pulitzer Prize for Explanatory Reporting, the 2011 Pulitzer Prize in National Reporting, and a 2010 Pulitzer Prize in Investigative Reporting. David is a publication designer and web geek, formerly at BusinessWeek, Pearson Ed, and consulting land.

    http://5by5.tv/bigwebshow/157

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  10. ✨3 CSS Grid Features That Make My Heart Flutter | Una Kravets Online✨

    I’m having a hard time containing my excitement for CSS grid: a spec thats been in the works for a while, but is finally here! News of grid has been exploding in popularity on the web as its becoming increasingly implemented in browsers (upvote here for Edge). Firefox also just came out with a pretty sweet Grid editing view in its developer tools, and I imagine Chrome will soon, too.

    https://una.im/css-grid/#💁

    —Huffduffed by adactio

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