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adactio / Jeremy Keith

An Irish web developer living in Brighton, England working with Clearleft.

I built Huffduffer.

There are thirty-eight people in adactio’s collective.

Huffduffed (3516)

  1. Modern CSS with Jen Simmons - CaSE

    Stefan Tilkov talks to Jen Simmons about CSS, the standard for applying layout rules to HTML pages. Jen talks about the often misunderstood role of CSS in the Web stack, why it matters, and how it has grown ever more powerful over the course of time. Also included: Some discussion about why so many developers don’t like CSS and what to do about it, and new features coming to the CSS standard.

    CaSE is an interview podcast for software developers and architects about Software Engineering and related topics. We release a new episode every three weeks.

    http://www.case-podcast.org/1-modern-css-with-jen-simmons

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. “The Chosen” from ProPublica — Responsive Web Design

    The Chosen presents cabinet nominees in an easy-to-read trading card format. Jessica Huseman and Rob Weychert describe how they developed this informative site for ProPublica.

    https://responsivewebdesign.com/podcast/propublica-the-chosen/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. An Antarctic Chef

    Charles Green. Chas to his family, ‘cook’ to his colleagues. A young baker whose sense of adventure drew him to a career cooking on the sea. You may never have heard of Charles, but you certainly will have heard of an expedition on which he played a crucial role…

    Charles was cook for the crew of the 1914 Trans-Antarctic Expedition led by Sir Ernest Shackleton. A disastrous expedition which ended up lasting for more than two years. The men were forced to camp on moving ice flows, and eventually a remote Antarctic beach on Elephant Island. But against all odds, every man on Shackleton’s ship The Endurance survived. In August 1916, the men were rescued. They were on the edge of starvation.

    During their time on the ice, Charlie Green cooked tirelessly using his creative flair to concoct meals out of exceptionally meagre means. His food kept the men alive. He went back to the Antarctic with Shackleton on the expedition which would be Shackleton’s last. But then, despite living until the 1970s, he faded into obscurity. Known only for slide shows that he gave locally with the well-known images of the expedition.

    One hundred years on, another Antarctic chef Gerard Baker, uncovers the extraordinary life led by Charles Green and his version of two years cooking for the men of the Endurance. One of the greatest survival stories of all time.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b07vk71m

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. Cooking clubs in Basqueland

    Spain’s Basque region exerts a powerful influence on global cuisine, Dan Saladino finds out why. Heston Blumenthal and writer Harold Mcgee provide insights into this food culture.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b0829dcq

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. Google—50 Things That Made the Modern Economy

    The words ‘clever’ and ‘death’ crop up less often than ‘Google’ in conversation. That’s according to researchers at the University of Lancaster in the UK. It took just two decades for Google to reach this cultural ubiquity. Larry Page and Sergey Brin – Google’s founders – were not, initially, interested in designing a better way to search. Their Stanford University project had a more academic motivation. Tim Harford tells the extraordinary story of a technology which might shape our access to knowledge for generations to come.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p04rv3v3

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. The Compiler—50 Things That Made the Modern Economy

    Installing Windows might take 5,000 years without the compiler, a remarkable innovation which made modern computing possible. Tim Harford tells a compelling story which has at its heart a pioneering woman called Grace Hopper who – along the way – single-handedly invented the idea of open source software too.

    The compiler evolved into COBOL – one of the first computer languages – and led to the distinction between hardware and software.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p04n04cm

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. M-Pesa—50 Things That Made the Modern Economy

    Transferring money by text message is far safer and more convenient than cash. M-Pesa, as it is known, first took off in Kenya. The idea was to make it easier for small businesses to repay micro-finance loans. But, almost immediately, M-Pesa exploded into something far bigger - there are now 100 times more M-Pesa kiosks than ATMs in Kenya – and with far-reaching consequences, in many developing economies. Tim Harford describes how money transferred this way is easy to trace, which is bad news for the corrupt. And good news for tax authorities.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p04kxddv

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  8. The Barcode—50 Things That Made the Modern Economy

    How vast mega-stores emerged with the help of a design originally drawn in the sand in 1948 by Joseph Woodland as he sat on a Florida beach, observing the furrows left behind, an idea came to him which would – eventually – become the barcode. This now ubiquitous stamp, found on virtually every product, was designed to make it easier for retailers to automate the process of recording sales. But, as Tim Harford explains, its impact would prove to be far greater than that. The barcode changed the balance of power between large and small retailers.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p04k0066

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  9. 252: Finding “A Thing” with Una Kravets and Krystal Higgins - ShopTalk

    It’s conference season and we’ve Una Kravets and Krystal Higgins from An Event Apart Seattle on to talk about how they got into their “things” – the stuff they talk about, why they picked that topic, what to do if other people hop on your thing, and ideas to start giving talks at conferences.

    Jump to a discussion on…

    9:10 Summary of Krystal’s talk “The Joy of Optimizing” talk at An Event Apart Seattle

    14:10 How did Krystal learn about on-boarding and dive in to it?

    17:20 Can a good app still survive even with bad on-boarding?

    19:10 Dave walks into a bar and signs up for Snapchat.

    22:01 How do you rate a good or bad on-boarding experience?

    26:30 How do you get invited to talk at conferences?

    33:40 How does Krystal’s involvement with Android Wear relate to on-boarding?

    35:30 Chris tries on a HTC Vive

    44:01 What happens if somebody starts treading on your thing?

    47:40 If too many people have the same thing, does it create too much noise around it?

    50:50 What if no one is interested in your thing?

    52:07 3 things to look for in a conference talk.

    55:05 Chris’ low-fi way to test out a talk idea.

    http://shoptalkshow.com/episodes/252-finding-thing-una-kravets-krystal-higgins/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  10. Irish Music Stories Podcast: Episode 01-Trip to Sligo

    This inaugural episode tells the tale of Cormac Gaj and the band he formed with fellow Boston tweens. I learn about their amazing journey to the All Ireland music competition in Sligo; and I dig into what it meant to Cormac… and to all the parents, teachers, and peers who were in on the qualifying round in New Jersey, and the big Fleadh (contest) in Ireland. Whether you already play the fiddle or you don’t know anything about trad music or dance, you’ll join me, Shannon Heaton as I visit Boston and Dublin Comhaltas branches (Irish music schools); Mary MacNamara’s kitchen in Tulla, where she teaches music and organizes Irish music exchanges; and Cormac’s living room where he tells his big story. Great stories here from Chicago fiddler Liz Carroll, too. There’s plenty of music here, too. Full music listings and information at www.irishmusicstories.org  

    http://irishmusicstories.libsyn.com/podcast/episode-01-trip-to-sligo

    —Huffduffed by adactio

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