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adactio / Jeremy Keith

An Irish web developer living in Brighton, England working with Clearleft.

I built Huffduffer.

There are thirty-seven people in adactio’s collective.

Huffduffed (3682)

  1. Highest-Capacity Data Cable

    There is news of the high-capacity data cable stretching across the Atlantic that has now been completed. The cable is threaded across the ocean floor from Virginia Beach, Virginia to Bilbao, Spain.

    Researchers from MIT are developing a system that allows a “Primer” robot to don various exoskeletons to give it different capabilities. Daniela Rus from MIT joins Click to discuss it.

    Nisha Ligon’s company Ubongo is a winner of this year’s WISE award. Ligon talks about designing digital material for school children in Africa.

    An AI retreat at the location in Norway used for the film Ex-Machina has been the focus of expert discussion on the future of AI. Bill Thompson joined the retreat arranged by Clearleft’s Andy Budd.

    Fixfest, the first international gathering for the community repair movement takes place at the weekend bringing together fixers from Argentina to Norway. Click hears from one of the organisers, Janet Gaunter of the Restart Project and from Jean-Sébastien Bigras whose company Insertech specialises in teaching repair and preventing waste.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/w3cstxl1

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. Web Components w/ Alex Russell

    Official Post from Mikeal: After my recent adventures in WebComponents I thought it would be fun to sit down with Alex for a quick chat.Alex has been working on WebComponent standards since the beginning. We touch on the history as well as some of the changes in programming style when you have to live in the same world that n

    https://www.patreon.com/posts/webcomponents-w-14563373

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. 8: Stephen Webb | Fermi’s Paradox (or, where are all the aliens?)

    Our universe’s vastness and age has given alien intelligence ample space and time in which to arise. Why can we detect no sign of it?  This is actually a momentous and scientifically serious question. Yes, really! With British astronomer Stephen Webb.

    https://after-on.com/episodes/008

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. Brian Cox on Robert Oppenheimer

    Significant international thinkers deliver the BBC’s flagship annual lecture series

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p05hctvq

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. Irish fiddle master Brian Conway brings his Sligo-style music to Las Cruces | KRWG

    Brian Conway is one of the finest County Sligo-style Irish fiddlers in the United States and abroad. The winner of several All-Irish Fiddle contests in Ireland, the native New Yorker has been playing fiddle since was ten, continuing a musical tradition that Irish musicians brought to this country and which has continued to evolve here. He brought his fiddle to the KRWG studios to talk with Intermezzo host Leora Zeitlin about the music he plays and the musicians who taught and inspired him, including his father. And while here, he demonstrated a little bit of the unique Sligo "accent" that defines Sligo-style fiddle-playing.

    http://krwg.org/post/irish-fiddle-master-brian-conway-brings-his-sligo-style-music-las-cruces

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. E.O. Wilson and Stories

    The really big questions.

    http://trbq.org/listen/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. Steven Pinker on Music

    The really big questions.

    http://trbq.org/listen/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  8. Oliver Sipple - Radiolab

    In a flash of heroism and humanity, Oliver Sipple saved a life and became something he never wanted to be.

    One morning, Oliver Sipple went out for a walk. A couple hours later, to his own surprise, he saved the life of the President of the United States. But in the days that followed, Sipple’s split-second act of heroism turned into a rationale for making his personal life into political opportunity. What happens next makes us wonder what a moment, or a movement, or a whole society can demand of one person. And how much is too much?

    Through newly unearthed archival tape, we hear Sipple himself grapple with some of the most vexing topics of his day and ours - privacy, identity, the freedom of the press - not to mention the bonds of family and friendship.

    http://www.radiolab.org/story/oliver-sipple/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  9. The Basement Tapes

    Listen to “The Basement Tapes” Season 2 Episode 10 of The Revisionist History Podcast with Malcolm Gladwell.

    A cardiologist in Minnesota searches through the basement of his childhood home for a missing box of data from a long-ago experiment. What he discovers changes our understanding of the modern American diet — but also teaches us something profound about what really matters when we honor our parents’ legacy.

    http://revisionisthistory.com/episodes/20-the-basement-tapes

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  10. McDonald’s Broke My Heart

    Listen to “McDonald’s Broke My Heart” Season 2 Episode 9 of The Revisionist History Podcast with Malcolm Gladwell.

    McDonald’s used to make the best fast food french fries in the world — until they changed their recipe in 1990. Revisionist History travels to the top food R&D lab in the country to discover what was lost, and why for the past generation we’ve been eating french fries that taste like cardboard.

    http://revisionisthistory.com/episodes/19-mcdonalds-broke-my-heart

    —Huffduffed by adactio

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