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adactio / Jeremy Keith

An Irish web developer living in Brighton, England working with Clearleft.

I built Huffduffer.

There are thirty-seven people in adactio’s collective.

Huffduffed (3715)

  1. David Weinberger: “Everything is Miscellaneous” | Talks at Google

    Author David Weinberger discusses his book "Everything Is Miscellaneous" as part of the Authors@Google series. David Weinberger is the co-author of the international bestseller "The Cluetrain Manifesto" and the author of "Small Pieces Loosely Joined". A fellow at Harvard Law School’s Berkman Center for the Internet and Society, Weinberger writes for such publications as Wired, The New York Times, Smithsonian, and the Harvard Business Review and is a frequent commentator for NPR’s All Things Considered. This event took place May 10, 2007 at Google Headquarters in Mountain View, CA.

    ===
    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=43DZEy_J694
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Mon, 27 Nov 2017 17:29:36 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. Pragmatism and fundamentals, with Harry Roberts | Fixate

    Published Nov 23, 2017

    Harry Roberts is a heavy-weight in the world of front-end architecture. While working at Sky, Harry began developing approaches to writing manageable and scalable CSS, revolutionising the way people think about front-ends. Harry now consults for a long list of companies like Google, The UN, The BBC, and Deloitte.

    Time Stamped Show Notes

    1:55 – Harry loves anything to do with the outdoors. He enjoys hiking, mountaineering, mountain biking, and cycling.

    2:36 – About ten years ago Harry and his best friend started a graphic design company. When building their company site, he realised he was way better at code than he would ever be at design. That’s when he decided to get into front-end development.

    3:43 – In 2011, Harry started working as a senior developer at Sky, a broadcasting and multimedia company in the UK and Europe. This was where he got into large-scale performance architecture. He then got a job building the UI’s for highly-trafficked websites making hundreds of millions of Pounds a year. From there, he moved on to do the same for other companies. For the last three and a half years or so, he has been working for himself.

    10:33 – Harry explains that he doesn’t really use many tools. He says that he’s good at prioritising things, and tools or not, he gets things done. Harry runs his life on a “just in time” basis. He only completes tasks right before they are needed as a way not to frontload too much information. This technique prevents him from having to memorise things for too long.

    12:19 – Because he travels so much and is often in different time zones, Harry says that it’s difficult for him to develop a routine. Although he has known for a couple of years that he needs to address this, he isn’t sure how to go about it.

    12:51 – Harry admits that he’s bad with email. He knows he could fix this by implementing a routine, but he hasn’t yet. Also, he still uses Gmail even though he has heard that Inbox is better as it allows you to treat your email like a todo list.

    14:23 – Harry says that he doesn’t really use frameworks. He gets more excited about standard specifications. Service Worker is revolutionising everything.

    15:00 – Harry uses Web Components. He thinks they will allow developers to start moving things out of frameworks and into standardised specs.

    15:13 – “I really want the web to win so I’m just quite excited about the platform in general at the moment. I’m not working with a particular library or framework specifically at the moment – I’m quite agnostic in that regard.”

    15:48 – Harry says that he’s lucky to get invited to a lot of conferences. Last year he went to thirty! Even though it is work for him, conferences are also great opportunities for him to learn. He is constantly surrounded by people doing interesting new things and who are demystifying complex concepts.

    16:40 – Harry admits that he is genuinely in love with his industry. He is fascinated by what developers are doing, and browses Hacker News or Twitter whenever he gets the chance. He is constantly immersed in what developers are doing, but he doesn’t learn these things inside out. He just keeps a broad view of the industry. “You can just watch a 40 minute talk and think, “I understand enough about that to know that I don’t need it yet and when I do need it, I know where to start Googling”.

    18:58 – Encapsulation has had the biggest impact on how Harry thinks about code. In his experience, when a client’s CSS is in a mess, it’s usually because they’ve made it too complex.

    19:35 – “The first time you ever do anything you will probably get it wrong.” Understanding this, you should make sure that everything is undoable and encapsulated enough that you can decommission discrete sections of your code rather than having to rewrite everything.

    Quickfire Questions

    20:55 – Best advice about programmingOliver Reichenstein once told Harry, “never do it for money, but never do it for no money”. Developers tend to love what they do to the point that they will do it for free. This often leads to open source burnout.

    22:02 – Habits for writing better code

    Pragmatism and laziness. Not trying to write perfect code the first time you are faced with a problem.

    23:09 – BookHigh Performance Browser Networking by Ilya Grigorik. It has made Harry a fundamentally better developer because, after reading it, he understands how the internet actually works.

    23:49 – Inspiring devs

    Anyone on the Google Developer relations team. He mentions Alex Russell and, specifically, Jake Archibald, because he’s doing a lot of work with Service Worker. He also mentions Paul Lewis for his render performance work, and Nicolas Gallagher who made big waves at Twitter.

    25:29 – How to learn code from scratch

    When asked how he would go about learning programming from scratch, Harry jokes that he he might not want to, and that his dream job is to be a park ranger in a national park somewhere. He would like to “wake up and check that the eagles are ok and maybe release a deer trapped in a fence”.

    25:45 – If he had to learn programming again, Harry says he would probably take a similar approach to what he did the first time. He would reverse engineer things and pick them apart. However, this time he’d start with the fundamentals about the internet. After reading Ilya’s book, he learnt that you can learn all the HTML, CSS and JavaScript in the world, but if you don’t understand how it’s getting transported to users, then you’re probably making incorrect decisions.

    26:42 – Another inspiring dev

    Harry mentions Jeremy Keith as another developer who inspires him. Jeremy focuses on the fundamentals.

    26:56 – How to work smart

    Harry’s programming tip is not to memorise stuff you don’t have to. He believes that working smart is to devise a plan of attack, take a pragmatic approach to things, and become good at prioritising. Learn how to ask for help, and surround yourself with people who know more than you do.

    Books, Tools, and Tips Mentioned

    Service Worker

    Web Components

    Hacker News

    ReactJS

    High Performance Browser Networking

    Contact Harry

    twitter: @csswizardry

    http://fixate.it/podcast/pragmatism-and-fundamentals-harry-roberts/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. What makes a good speaker? Kelsey Hightower Lara Hogan

    Lara Hogan, who literally wrote the book on public speaking, and Kelsey Hightower, speaker and chair of many tech conferences, join us to share their personal speaking stories (and nightmares!), how they prepare their talks, and the common mistakes they see first-time speakers make.

    https://www.codenewbie.org/podcast/what-makes-a-good-speaker

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. Dave Winer on The Open Web, Blogging, Podcasting and More | Internet History Podcast

    Dave Winer has been called the godfather of a lot of things. The godfather of blogging. The Godfather of Podcasting. One of the key people involved in the development of RSS. But as you’ll hear in this great and wide ranging chat, Dave Winer is just a software developer who has never stopped tinkering, never lost his interest in coming up with new tools and new technologies. Dave was kind enough to sit down and go over his whole career, from the very earliest days of the PC era, to the present day.

    http://www.internethistorypodcast.com/2017/10/dave-winer-on-the-open-web-blogging-podcasting-and-more/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. A+E 2017 - Trevor Paglen: Orbital Reflector

    In partnership with aerospace engineers and the Nevada Museum of Art, Trevor Paglen will launch Orbital Reflector into low-earth orbit as the world’s first nonutilitarian satellite. This ephemeral artwork will have a life span of several weeks. Paglen aims to make an artistic and aesthetic statement while encouraging dialogue related to larger issues surrounding the interdisciplinary fields of science, engineering, politics, and space.

    Learn more about Orbital Reflector: http://orbitalreflector.com/

    Learn more about Trevor Paglen: http://www.paglen.com/

    Learn more about the Nevada Museum of Art: http://www.nevadaart.org

    ===
    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DpNHmp-e9WQ
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Sat, 18 Nov 2017 19:07:33 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. Why Thor: Ragnorak Is So Damn Funny

    Good One: A Podcast About Jokes is a podcast about - well - jokes, and the people who tell them. Each week, a comedian will play a joke of their’s and then break it down with Vulture.com Senior Editor Jesse David Fox.

    Jesse David Fox talks to Taika Waititi about making Thor: Ragnorak and how a $200 million budget couldn’t stop him from embracing his inner six-year-old.

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. Sticking to the essentials, with Sara Soueidan | Fixate

    Published Nov 16, 2017

    Sara is a freelance front-end web developer, author, and speaker from Lebanon. She was named Developer of the Year in the 2015 .net magazine awards, and awarded a Web Platform Award from O’Reilly. Sara is the author of Codrops CSS Reference, and is the co-author of Real-Life Responsive Web Design, which focuses on smart “responsive” workflows, effective UX patterns, and powerful front-end techniques.

    Time Stamped Show Notes

    2:33 – Sara is passionate about the possibilities developers have to build useful things for people and for the generations to come. She believes developers have the tools for building the future, and is excited by the fact that the web is getting more powerful by the day.

    3:21 – Sara says that learning and teaching have opened a lot of doors for her. She first got into speaking because of the articles she wrote whilst experimenting with, and learning new features. She actually got her first job from her experiments on CodePen.

    4:34 – Burning out after working on a project taught Sara about what to do, what not to do, what to expect, what not to expect, and to tell clients what to expect and what not to expect.

    8:16 – Sara explains that she doesn’t use a lot of frameworks or tools. She uses HTML, CSS, and Sass. On very simple projects, she doesn’t even use Grunt, Gulp, or any other build tool like that. She writes with the bare minimum.

    9:00 – Sara uses Alfred to speed up her workflow.

    9:37 – TextExpander helps Sara save time by allowing her to respond to frequently asked questions in emails she receives using templates.

    10:17 – Sara loves Sublime Text as her editor, and uses a lot of the plugins that come with it to help her type less.

    10:52 – Sara works early in the morning to avoid distractions on Twitter.

    11:27 – Sara removes any applications, such as email and Twitter, from her work computer that are not essential for work.

    13:05 – Larry mentions how Dash is an app that aggregates documentation, and also integrates nicely with Alfred. It also has its own snippet manager, similar to TextExpander.

    13:56 – Sara finds that she doesn’t have the most productive way to set up projects. She currently uses Jekyll for her website, but the bigger the website becomes, the slower Jekyll becomes.

    14:30 – She admits that Grunt, Gulp, Browserify, or Webpack would make her workflow better, but she finds the thought of installing them and getting them to work overwhelming.

    15:42 – Sara is excited about CSS Grid, because it’s like a CSS framework without a framework. She believes that there’ll be no need for any kind of CSS framework to build grids and websites in the future. She mentions that she has never been a fan of frameworks like Bootstrap as she feels there’s always too much to edit, change, and fix.

    16:21 – Combining CSS Grid with Flexbox is “like magic”.

    17:23 – Sara makes time to learn new things when she needs to use new things.

    18:48 – “Java is to JavaScript as car is to carpet.” Sara studied Java in university. Learning that there was a fundamental difference between Java and Javascript, and that there was a mental shift required in order to work in the different languages has changed the way Sara views technologies.

    Quickfire Questions

    20:17 – Best advice about programming

    Learn the basics. Learn HTML, CSS, and native JavaScript before rushing into frameworks. Learn what you need, when you need it.

    20:46 – Habits for writing better code

    Thinking from a user’s perspective, not only a developer’s perspective. Test components early on – not code testing, but user testing.

    21:39 – BookResponsive Design: Patterns & Principles by Ethan MarcotteGoing Responsive by Karen McGraneAdaptive Web Design by Aaron GustafsonInclusive Design Patterns by Heydon Pickering

    22:50 – Inspiring devsEthan Marcotte and Jeremy Keith. Sara is inspired by anyone who works for the user and who teaches people in the industry to care about them too. She likes that these two authors teach developers how to write better experiences.

    24:40 – How to learn code from scratch

    Sara says that she would definitely be overwhelmed at first if she had to learn programming from scratch. She mentions that she is thankful that she had a mentor to help her get started from the right place. She would start with the basics, because she can’t use a tool or a language unless she really understands it.

    25:34 – How to work smart

    Work healthy. Take care of yourself and to get enough sleep. A healthy body is a healthy mind.

    Books, Tools, and Tech Mentioned

    CoDrops CSS Reference

    CodePen

    Sass

    CodeKit

    Alfred App

    Dash

    TextExpander

    Jekyll

    Sublime Text

    Browserify

    WebPack

    The Smashing Book 5: Real-Life Responsive Web Design

    Contact Sara

    twitter: @SaraSoueidan

    website: www.sarasoueidan.com

    http://fixate.it/podcast/sticking-to-the-essentials-sara-soueidan/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  8. Tabetha Boyajian: The most mysterious star in the universe | TED Talk

    Something massive, with roughly 1,000 times the area of Earth, is blocking the light coming from a distant star known as KIC 8462852, and nobody is quite sure what it is. As astronomer Tabetha Boyajian investigated this perplexing celestial object, a colleague suggested something unusual: Could it be an alien-built megastructure? Such an extraordinary idea would require extraordinary evidence. In this talk, Boyajian gives us a look at how scientists search for and test hypotheses when faced with the unknown.

    https://www.ted.com/talks/tabetha_boyajian_the_most_mysterious_star_in_the_universe

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  9. Wanda Diaz Merced: How a blind astronomer found a way to hear the stars | TED Talk

    Wanda Diaz Merced studies the light emitted by gamma-ray bursts, the most energetic events in the universe. When she lost her sight and was left without a way to do her science, she had a revelatory insight: the light curves she could no longer see could be translated into sound. Through sonification, she regained mastery over her work, and now she’s advocating for a more inclusive scientific community. "Science is for everyone," she says. "It has to be available to everyone, because we are all natural explorers."

    https://www.ted.com/talks/wanda_diaz_merced_how_a_blind_astronomer_found_a_way_to_hear_the_stars

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  10. Hardcore History 60 The Celtic Holocaust

    Julius Caesar is our travel guide as he takes us through his murderous subjugation of the native Celtic tribal peoples of ancient Gaul. It sounds vaguely like other, recent European colonial conquests…until the natives nearly win.

    http://www.dancarlin.com/hardcore-history-60-the-celtic-holocaust/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

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