Reith Lectures — Bernard Lovell: The Individual and the Universe, Part 1, 1958

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  1. October 12th: Lovell Telescope Detects Sputnik

    On this day in 1957, the newly constructed Mark I telescope at Jodrell Bank became involved in the dawn of the space age when it picked up a radar echo from the rocket that had carried Sputnik 1 into space. We tell you about the history of the famous telescope, which was later named after its founder Sir Bernard Lovell, and describe some of the astronomical observations it has been involved with since.

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    Tagged with astronomy

    —Huffduffed by podcastreview

  2. Grayson Perry: Beating the Bounds

    The award-winning artist Grayson Perry presents the 2013 BBC Reith Lectures, titled Playing to the Gallery. Across four programmes he discusses what makes him an artist, the limits of contemporary art, how to gauge the quality of new artworks and the future of the avant-garde.

    Grayson Perry questions the often-heard assertion that anything can be art, in a lecture recorded at St. George’s Hall in Liverpool.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/podcasts/series/reith

    —Huffduffed by lach

  3. Grayson Perry: Nice Rebellion, Welcome In!

    The award-winning artist Grayson Perry presents the 2013 BBC Reith Lectures, titled Playing to the Gallery. Across four programmes he discusses what makes him an artist, the limits of contemporary art, how to gauge the quality of new artworks and the future of the avant-garde.

    Can art still shock us or have we seen it all before? Speaking to an audience at The Guildhall in Londonderry, the artist Grayson Perry asks if revolution is a defining idea in art, or has it met its end?

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/podcasts/series/reith

    —Huffduffed by lach

  4. Marina Warner: Monstrous Mothers

    This year’s Reith lecturer is the Booker prize-nominated author Marina Warner. A writer of fiction, criticism and history, her works include novels and short stories as well as studies of art, myths, symbols, and fairytales. Her series of Reith Lectures, entitled ‘Managing Monsters’, explores how myths express and shape our attitudes.

    In the first of six lectures, Marina Warner examines the role of the bad mother in myth. From Medea to Jurassic Park, she looks at how the ‘she-monster’ has been depicted in fiction and the effect of those myths on society today.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p00gxpbh

    —Huffduffed by lach

  5. Reith Lectures: “The Persistence of Faith” — The Environment of Faith

    In 1990, Chief Rabbi Jonathan Sacks delivered six Reith Lectures on the BBC. Listen to all six lectures as Lord Sacks examines religion and ethics in a secular society. He explores how objective standards influence people’s ethics, discusses the religious institution of marriage in society, examines the language of religion and community, assesses the mix of religious revival and nationalism, and explains why faith survives.

    http://onbeing.org/program/dignity-difference/feature/reith-lectures-persistence-faith/1946

    —Huffduffed by dealingwith

  6. Grayson Perry: Democracy Has Bad Taste

    The award-winning artist Grayson Perry presents the 2013 BBC Reith Lectures, titled Playing to the Gallery. Across four programmes he discusses what makes him an artist, the limits of contemporary art, how to gauge the quality of new artworks and the future of the avant-garde.

    In his first Reith Lecture the British artist Grayson Perry explains the process of assessing quality in contemporary art. Recorded in front of an audience at Tate Modern in London, Perry argues that there is no empirical way to judge quality in art. Instead the validation of quality rests in the hands of a tightknit group of people at the heart of the art world including curators, dealers, collectors and critics who decide in the end what ends up in galleries and museums. Often the last to have a say is the general public.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/podcasts/series/reith

    —Huffduffed by lach

  7. BBC - Podcasts - Reith Lectures

    The economic historian Professor Niall Ferguson presents the 2012 BBC Reith Lectures, titled The Rule of Law and Its Enemies. Across four programmes he explores the role of man-made institutions on global economic growth and democracy, referencing the global economic crisis and financial regulation, as well as the Arab Spring. The first programme will be available to download on Tuesday, 19 June 2012.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/podcasts/series/reith

    —Huffduffed by tregeagle