Michael Chabon - The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay

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  1. AOT #188: Michael Chabon’s “Manhood for Amateurs”

    Michael Chabon, the Pulitzer Prize-winning author whose works include The Mysteries of Pittsburgh, Wonder Boys, The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay, and The Yiddish Policemen’s Union, reads from and discusses his new book Manhood for Amateurs: The Pleasures and Regrets of a Husband, Father, and Son. Chabon’s first major work of nonfiction, Manhood for Amateurs is a memoir as inventive, beautiful, and powerful as his acclaimed, award-winning fiction. In these insightful, provocative, slyly interlinked essays, Chabon presents his autobiography and his vision of life and explores what it means to be a man today.

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  2. To Be Continued?

    From http://www.theincomparable.com/2010/11/11-to-be-continued.html Three Hugo winners enter our Book Club. “Spin” by Robert Charles Wilson, “Hyperion” by Dan Simmons, and “The Yiddish Policeman’s Union” by Michael Chabon. Also: Why sequels suck. The Incomparable Participants: Jason Snell, Glenn Fleishman, Dan Moren, Scott McNulty, and Greg Knauss. The Incomparable Theme Song composed by Christopher Breen.

    Updated on Thursday evening, November 11, to fix a strange empty spot and add an explanation about what “work me like a ham” means. But you have to listen to the end. And re-download if you missed it.

    Spoiler Horn Data

    Please note that this episode contains spoilers for the three books mentioned above. The AAC version of the podcast has been demarcated with chapter breaks so you can skip some (or, heck, all!) of the spoilers for those books. Presumably so you can come back later after you’ve read the books, right?

    —Huffduffed by theJBJshow

  3. Clay Shirky on Cognitive Surplus

    Clay Shirky, adjunct professor at New York University’s Interactive Telecommunications Program, discusses his new book, Cognitive Surplus: Creativity and Generosity in a Connected Age. Shirky talks about social and economic effects of Internet technologies and interrelated effects of social and technological networks. In this podcast he discusses social production, open source software, Wikipedia, defaults, Facebook, and more.

    http://surprisinglyfree.com/2010/06/14/clay-shirky-on-cognitive-surplus/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. The Omnivore’s Next Dilemma

    Michael Pollan at TED 2007:

    "What if human consciousness isn’t the end-all and be-all of Darwinism? What if we are all just pawns in corn’s clever strategy game to rule the Earth? Author Michael Pollan asks us to see the world from a plant’s-eye view."

    http://www.ted.com/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. We’ll Always Have Zeppelins — The Incomparable

    Climb in your Zeppelin, grab a self-burning book, and prepare for the first Incomparable Podcast, in which we discuss "The City and The City," "The Windup Girl," "For The Win," and more. Plus we mispronounce the names of writers.

    The Incomparable Participants: Glenn Fleishman, Scott McNulty, Dan Moren, and Jason Snell. The Incomparable Theme Song composed by Christopher Breen.

    Prominently mentioned in this Incomparable episode:

    • "The City & The City" by China Miéville
    • "The Windup Girl" by Paolo Bacigalupi
    • "For the Win" by Cory Doctorow

    Also mentioned:

    • "Perdido Street Station" by China Miéville
    • "Little Brother" by Cory Doctorow
    • "Down and Out in the Magic Kingdom" by Cory Doctorow
    • "Boneshaker" by Cherie Priest
    • "The Gone-Away World" by Nick Harkaway
    • "Ship Breaker" by Paolo Bacigalupi
    • "Tongues of Serpents" by Naomi Novik
    • "The Dream of Perpetual Motion" by Dexter Palmer
    • "A Storm of Swords" by George R.R. Martin
    • "Oryx and Crake" by Margaret Atwood
    • "The Yiddish Policeman’s Union" by Michael Chabon
    • "Bitter Seeds" by Ian Tregillis
    • "The Adamantine Palace" by Stephen Deas
    • "Shades of Grey" by Jasper Fforde
    • "Fables" by Bill Willingham and Lan Medina

    http://www.theincomparable.com/2010/08/1-well-always-have-zeppelins-1.html

    —Huffduffed by adactio