The Octonion Math That Could Underpin Physics | Quanta Magazine

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  1. In physics, failure brings almost as much excitement as success | Public Radio International

    Scientists have used the Standard Model of particle physics since the 1970s. The model has explained and predicted many properties of our universe. But scientists know other particles exist that will fill in the gaps in our current understanding. Finding them is one of the great challenges of this century.

    http://www.pri.org/stories/2016-08-27/physics-failure-brings-almost-much-excitement-success

    —Huffduffed by grankabeza

  2. Big Ideas: The Importance of the Higgs Boson

    The recent discovery of a new subatomic particle, believed to be the long-sought Higgs boson, was hailed as one of the biggest announcements in physics for a century - as a human achievement which will be known 300 years from now. The Higgs Boson is the final missing ingredient in the Standard Model of particle physics. This model describes the fundamental particles from which every visible thing in the universe is made, and the forces acting between them. Listen to the scientists at the level of the experiments which led to this discovery.

    http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/bigideas/higgs-boson/4246954

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  3. Mustang Physics, April 2011: Sonifying Subatomic Physics

    On this episode of “Mustang Physics,” Matt Bellis (Stanford University) discusses his spontaneous collaboration with both physicists and non-physicists that has turned particle collision data into music with the goal of giving new communities an experience with physics data. “Mustang Physics” is your gateway into the world of physics and the lives and thoughts of physicists.

    Matt Bellis is a post-doctoral researcher at Stanford University. He works on the BaBar Experiment at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. He presented the SMU Physics Department Seminar on March 7, 2011, where he discussed his work on the search for fundamental symmetry violations that might explain our asymmetric cosmos. He spoke with me about his effort to use particle physics data to produce music. This effort would allow whole new communities to experience and use particle physics data.

    http://blog.smu.edu/mustangphysics/2011/04/30/episode-005-sonifying-subatomic-physics/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. Angels and Demons Lecture Night - Hollywood Goes to ATLAS

    http://uslhc.us/Angels_Demons/schedule-videos.html

    May 21, 2009 Carleton University Louise Heelan

    This May will see the world premiere of Angels & Demons, an action-packed thriller based on Dan Brown’s best-selling novel that focuses on an apparent plot to destroy the Vatican using a small amount of antimatter. In the book and the movie, that antimatter is made using the Large Hadron Collider and is stolen from the European particle physics laboratory CERN. Parts of the movie were actually filmed at CERN. It’s not every day that a major motion picture places particle physics in the spotlight, especially one starring Tom Hanks and directed by Ron Howard. Through a series of public lectures, the particle physics community is using this opportunity to tell the world about the real science of antimatter, the Large Hadron Collider and the excitement of particle physics research.

    —Huffduffed by michele

  5. Breaking Baryons

    A light-hearted presentation about many aspects of particle accelerators like the LHC and their particle collision experiments. Aimed at technically interested non-scientists and physics buffs alike.

    When the Large Hadron Collider went into operation in 2008, many people around the world (re)discovered an interest in particle physics and collision experiments. If you are reading this, particle accelerators have not destroyed the world yet, giving us a chance to talk about them.

    Particle accelerators and collision experiments touch on many fascinating aspects of technology and physics that are far removed from our usual experiences: vast machines, high precision, huge energies, enormous volumes of data, tiny lifetimes and ultra-rare occurences.

    This talk wants to entertain and surprise with insights into the workings of particle accelerators, the instruments used to make discoveries and the techniques used for learning from their results.

    The talk is supposed to be enjoyable for the scientifically versed as well as the technically inclined or the interested observer. No physics background necessary!

    http://events.ccc.de/congress/2013/Fahrplan/events/5305.html

    Day: 2013-12-27 Start time: 23:00 Duration: 01:00 Room: Saal G Track: Science & Engineering Language: en

    —Huffduffed by Jonny007MKD

  6. Desperately Seeking Susy

    Supersymmetry has been particle theorists’ favorite toy for several decades. It predicts a yet unobserved symmetry of nature and implies that to each known type of elementary particle there exists a partner particle none of which has been detected up to today.

    I will explain why it is

    an attractive idea nevertheless and what is the current situation after the large hadron collider (LHC) at CERN has looked at many places where supersymmetric partners were expected and did not find them. Is it time to give up hope that susy is a property of nature?

    The speaker is a theoretical physics research at Munich university. His research focusses mainly on superstring theory (an extension of supersymmetry) and quantum gravity.

    http://events.ccc.de/congress/2013/Fahrplan/events/5416.html

    Day: 2013-12-28 Start time: 20:30 Duration: 01:00 Room: Saal 6 Track: Science & Engineering Language: en

    —Huffduffed by Jonny007MKD

  7. The Physics of Time

    When writing the Principia Mathematica, Isaac Newton declared his hand on most of the big questions in physics. He outlined the nature of space, explained the motions of the planets and conceived the operation of gravity. He also laid down the law on time declaring:

    “Absolute, true, and mathematical time, of itself and from its own nature, flows equably without relation to anything external.”

    For Newton time was absolute and set apart from the universe, but with the theories of Albert Einstein time became more complicated; it could be squeezed and distorted and was different in different places.

    Time is integral to our experience of things but we find it very difficult to think about. It may not even exist and yet seems written into the existence of absolutely everything.

    Contributors:

    Jim Al-Khalili, Professor of Theoretical Physics and Chair in the Public Engagement in Science at the University of Surrey

    Monica Grady, Professor of Planetary and Space Sciences at the Open University

    Ian Stewart, Professor of Mathematics at the University of Warwick

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/history/inourtime/inourtime_20081218.shtml

    (sometimes, they pull these shows after a week…but there’s a real audio stream available on their site: http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/history/inourtime/rams/inourtime_20081218.ram)

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  8. The Physics of Time

    When writing the Principia Mathematica, Isaac Newton declared his hand on most of the big questions in physics. He outlined the nature of space, explained the motions of the planets and conceived the operation of gravity. He also laid down the law on time declaring:

    “Absolute, true, and mathematical time, of itself and from its own nature, flows equably without relation to anything external.”

    For Newton time was absolute and set apart from the universe, but with the theories of Albert Einstein time became more complicated; it could be squeezed and distorted and was different in different places.

    Time is integral to our experience of things but we find it very difficult to think about. It may not even exist and yet seems written into the existence of absolutely everything.

    Contributors:

    Jim Al-Khalili, Professor of Theoretical Physics and Chair in the Public Engagement in Science at the University of Surrey

    Monica Grady, Professor of Planetary and Space Sciences at the Open University

    Ian Stewart, Professor of Mathematics at the University of Warwick

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/history/inourtime/inourtime_20081218.shtml

    (sometimes, they pull these shows after a week…but there’s a real audio stream available on their site: http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/history/inourtime/rams/inourtime_20081218.ram)

    —Huffduffed by BryanSchuetz