Kim Stanley Robinson: Valuing the Earth and Future Generations: Imagining Post-Capitalism

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  1. Episode 63: Kim Stanley Robinson – The Conversation

    Kim Stanley Robinson is one of the biggest names in current science fiction. His most famous work is, arguably, the Mars Trilogy, but he is the author of seventeen novels and several collections of short stories. I could easily overburden you with biographical details and lists of his accolades, but I’ll leave that to this very comprehensive fan page.

    I learned about Stan through my interview with Tim Morton in 2012—they are friends and, at the time, both lived in Davis. It took a year but, when I next passed through Davis, I was fortunate enough to get three hours to sit down with Stan and talk about the future. I was especially interested in Stan’s work because he is an incredible researcher and regularly uses his fiction to explore a variety of plausible economic, scientific, ecological, and social futures. In other words, he uses fiction to ask many of the same questions that we have been asking our interviewees throughout the project. The result, I think, is one of the strongest and most wide-ranging interviews in The Conversation.

    http://www.findtheconversation.com/episode-63-kim-stanley-robinson/

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  2. Politics of Science Fiction - Kim Stanley Robinson

    Kim Stanley Robinson, author of the "Mars" trilogy, "2312," and "Shaman," has been called our greatest living science fiction writer AND one of the greatest political novelists.  He writes post-capitalist page-turners set in the far future and the distant past. We talk with him about the politics of science and the imagination.

    http://www.ttbook.org/book/politics-science-fiction-kim-stanley-robinson

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  3. Kim Stanley Robinson

    Award-winning science fiction author Kim Stanley Robinson does exactly that in many of his works. In this episode of Generation Anthropocene, producer Mike Osborne sits down with Robinson to talk about his creative process and environmental thinking, what makes for good science fiction, and the genre’s capacity to imagine future societies shaped by climate change.

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  4. Kim Stanley Robinson In Conversation

    American science fiction writer, Kim Stanley Robinson, best known for his award winning "Mars" trilogy, joins Lucy Sussex at the Melbourne Writers Festival to discuss the inspiration for his work and the problems facing planet Earth.

    Robinson explains to his audience why it is important for everyone to know about science, especially in the face of the climate change crisis.

    It’s a subject very close to the author’s heart: virtually all of Robinson’s novels have an ecological component with sustainability being one of his major themes.

    Robinson also defends science fiction, believing it deserves more attention by literary awards such as the Booker Prize.

    After all, if one of his favourite authors Virginia Woolf was a science fiction fan, why can’t contemporary literary audiences appreciate the genre more?

    Kim Stanley Robinson is an American Science Fiction writer best known for the multi-award winning "Mars" trilogy.

    Other books include "The Years of Rice and Salt" and his latest book "Galileo’s Dream".

    In 2008 Kim Stanley Robinson was listed as the TIME "Hero of the Environment".

    Lucy Sussex is a New Zealand born writer, researcher and editor. Sussex has published many short stories and a few novels, including "The Scarlet Rider" which won the Ditmar, Best Novel in 1997. She currently writes a review column for "The West Australian" and "The Sunday Age".

    http://www.abc.net.au/tv/bigideas/stories/2010/10/12/3034904.htm

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  5. Stranger Than Fiction: Kim Stanley Robinson

    This week, Tim speaks with Kim Stanley Robinson, author of the Mars trilogy and 2312. In Slate last year, Choire Sicha of the Awl wrote that 2312 “is his boldest trip into all of the marvelous SF genres—ethnography, future shock, screed against capitalism, road to earth—and all of the ways to thrill and be thrilled. It’s a future history that’s so secure and comprehensive that it reads as an account of the past—a trick of craft that belongs almost exclusively to the supreme SF task force of Le Guin and Margaret Atwood.”

    In the episode, Robinson talks to Tim about the politics of science fiction, how robots have historically represented wage workers, and why we need to right Earth before we head to Mars.

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  6. Kim Stanley Robinson

    Think of the Anthropocene as a science fiction thought experiment. We imagine future geologists looking back into the rock record, and trying to pinpoint when humans became the dominant geologic force. In many ways, science fiction is the perfect genre for exploring environmental issues – running out scenarios and “what ifs” to their extremes, and imagining how that world would look and feel. Award-winning science fiction author Kim Stanley Robinson does exactly that in many of his works. In this thought-provoking conversation, producer Mike Osborne sits down with Robinson to talk about his creative process and environmental thinking, what makes for good science fiction, and the genre’s capacity to imagine future societies shaped by climate change.

    Generation Anthropocene is supported by Stanford’s School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences and by Worldview Stanford

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    Original video: https://soundcloud.com/generation-anthropocene/kim-stanley-robinson
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  7. Track Changes: Talking with Kim Stanley Robinson about his global warming epic, New York 2140

    Imagining New York’s underwater future: this week Paul and Rich talk to Kim Stanley Robinson, one of the most renowned science fiction writers alive. The author of nineteen novels, he describes his newest,

    New York 2140, as both a “post-disaster novel” and a “comedy of coping,” set in a New York City several decades after sea levels have risen and stabilized. They discuss the city’s history, its natural and manmade spaces, and its inevitable future due to climate change: how the watery city will adapt, and who will make a profit.

    http://trackchanges.libsyn.com/talking-with-kim-stanley-robinson-about-his-global-warming-epic-new-york-2140

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  8. Kim Stanley Robinson “How Climate Will Evolve Government and Society”

    Kim Stanley Robinson at The Interval: Humanity’s adaptation to climate change will require novel, global cooperation and societal evolution. The award-winning science fiction author of 2312, the Mars Trilogy, and Aurora shares his vision for how the world must change in advance of his 02017 novel New York 2140. Hosted by Stewart Brand. From May 02016.

    Kim Stanley Robinson is an American novelist, widely recognized as one of the foremost living writers of science fiction. His work has been described as "humanist science fiction" and "literary science fiction." He has published more than 20 novels including his much honored "Mars trilogy",

    New York 2140

    (02017), and Red Moon due out in October 02018. Robinson has a B.A. in Literature from UC San Diego and an M.A. in English from Boston University. He earned a Ph.D. in literature from UCSD with a dissertation on the works of Philip K. Dick.

    https://theinterval.org/salon-talks/02016/may/10/how-climate-will-evolve-government-and-society

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