Reith Lectures Archive: 1996 4. A Web Of Words

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  1. Radiolab: Words

    http://www.wnyc.org/shows/radiolab/episodes/2010/09/10

    It’s almost impossible to imagine a world without words. But in this hour of Radiolab, we try to do just that. We speak to a woman who taught a 27-year-old man the first words of his life, and we hear a firsthand account of what it feels like to have the language center of your brain wiped out by a stroke.

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  2. Reith Lectures: “The Persistence of Faith” — The Environment of Faith

    In 1990, Chief Rabbi Jonathan Sacks delivered six Reith Lectures on the BBC. Listen to all six lectures as Lord Sacks examines religion and ethics in a secular society. He explores how objective standards influence people’s ethics, discusses the religious institution of marriage in society, examines the language of religion and community, assesses the mix of religious revival and nationalism, and explains why faith survives.

    http://onbeing.org/program/dignity-difference/feature/reith-lectures-persistence-faith/1946

    —Huffduffed by dealingwith

  3. Marina Warner: Monstrous Mothers

    This year’s Reith lecturer is the Booker prize-nominated author Marina Warner. A writer of fiction, criticism and history, her works include novels and short stories as well as studies of art, myths, symbols, and fairytales. Her series of Reith Lectures, entitled ‘Managing Monsters’, explores how myths express and shape our attitudes.

    In the first of six lectures, Marina Warner examines the role of the bad mother in myth. From Medea to Jurassic Park, she looks at how the ‘she-monster’ has been depicted in fiction and the effect of those myths on society today.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p00gxpbh

    —Huffduffed by lach

  4. Grayson Perry: Beating the Bounds

    The award-winning artist Grayson Perry presents the 2013 BBC Reith Lectures, titled Playing to the Gallery. Across four programmes he discusses what makes him an artist, the limits of contemporary art, how to gauge the quality of new artworks and the future of the avant-garde.

    Grayson Perry questions the often-heard assertion that anything can be art, in a lecture recorded at St. George’s Hall in Liverpool.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/podcasts/series/reith

    —Huffduffed by lach

  5. Grayson Perry: Nice Rebellion, Welcome In!

    The award-winning artist Grayson Perry presents the 2013 BBC Reith Lectures, titled Playing to the Gallery. Across four programmes he discusses what makes him an artist, the limits of contemporary art, how to gauge the quality of new artworks and the future of the avant-garde.

    Can art still shock us or have we seen it all before? Speaking to an audience at The Guildhall in Londonderry, the artist Grayson Perry asks if revolution is a defining idea in art, or has it met its end?

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/podcasts/series/reith

    —Huffduffed by lach

  6. BBC Radio 4 - In Our Time, Language and the Mind

    Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the history of our ideas about the formation of language. The psychologist George Miller worked out that in English there are potentially a hundred million trillion sentences of twenty words in length - that’s a hundred times the number of seconds since the birth of the universe. “Language”, as Chomsky put it, “makes infinite use of finite media”. “Language”, as Steven Pinker puts it, “comes so naturally to us that it’s easy to forget what a strange and miraculous gift it is”. “All over the world”, he writes, “members of our species spend a good part of their lives fashioning their breath into hisses and hums and squeaks and pops and are listening to others do the same”. Jean Jacques Rousseau once said that we differ from the animal kingdom in two main ways - the use of language and the prohibition of incest. Language and our ability to learn it has been held up traditionally as our species’ most remarkable achievement, marking us apart from the animals. But in the 20th century, our ideas about how language is formed are being radically challenged and altered. With Dr Jonathan Miller, medical doctor, performer, broadcaster, author and film and opera director; Steven Pinker, cognitive scientist, Professor of Psychology and Director of the Centre for Neuroscience, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, California.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p00545cr

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. Interview: Melissa Mohr, Author Of ‘Holy Sh*t’ : NPR

    Curse words change over time — back in the ninth century you could say the "s" word and no one would be offended. But we always need a set of words that are off-limits, and in her new book, author Melissa Mohr explains how the words that shock us reveal a lot about society’s values.

    http://www.npr.org/2013/05/13/180811135/why-you-should-give-a-about-words-that-offend

    —Huffduffed by drewcompton