Reith Lectures Archive: 1996 1. A Web Of Worries

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  1. Interview: Ammon Shea, Author Of ‘Bad English: A History of Linguistic Aggravation’ : NPR

    A new book looks at words that self-appointed linguistic police have declared contraband, like "lunch," which should be a verb, and "balding," a participle formed from an adjective instead of a verb.

    http://www.npr.org/2014/06/03/318574907/from-lunch-n-to-balding-adj-some-words-are-just-bad-english?utm_source=tumblr.com&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=books&utm_term=artsculture&utm_content=20140604

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  2. A Taste of the Past - Episode 71 - Eat Your Words: A Culinary History of the English Language

    What do beat, bean, and leek all have in common with each other? Find out on this week’s episode A Taste of The Past where Linda goes into the history of food and culinary etymology with Ina Lipkowitz teacher of English literature and Biblical Studies at MIT and author of Words to Eat By. Discover the semantic shift in the word meat, the influence of the ancient Romans on plant breeds, and how much religious symbolism is based off food. Listen and become aware about how much food words have an impact on us. This episode is sponsored by The Hearst Ranch.

    http://www.heritageradionetwork.com/episodes/1752-A-Taste-of-the-Past-Episode-71-Eat-Your-Words-A-Culinary-History-of-the-English-Language

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  3. Reith Lectures: “The Persistence of Faith” — The Environment of Faith

    In 1990, Chief Rabbi Jonathan Sacks delivered six Reith Lectures on the BBC. Listen to all six lectures as Lord Sacks examines religion and ethics in a secular society. He explores how objective standards influence people’s ethics, discusses the religious institution of marriage in society, examines the language of religion and community, assesses the mix of religious revival and nationalism, and explains why faith survives.

    http://onbeing.org/program/dignity-difference/feature/reith-lectures-persistence-faith/1946

    —Huffduffed by dealingwith

  4. Marina Warner: Monstrous Mothers

    This year’s Reith lecturer is the Booker prize-nominated author Marina Warner. A writer of fiction, criticism and history, her works include novels and short stories as well as studies of art, myths, symbols, and fairytales. Her series of Reith Lectures, entitled ‘Managing Monsters’, explores how myths express and shape our attitudes.

    In the first of six lectures, Marina Warner examines the role of the bad mother in myth. From Medea to Jurassic Park, she looks at how the ‘she-monster’ has been depicted in fiction and the effect of those myths on society today.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p00gxpbh

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  5. Episode 51: Norse Words and a New English | The History of English Podcast

    During the 10th century,  the English language spoken in northern and eastern England began to change under the influence of Old Norse.  These changes resulted in a north-south linguistic divide which still exists today.  In this episode we examine how modern linguists use sound changes to identify Norse words in Modern English.  We also examine English-Norse synonyms derived from common Germanic root words.

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    http://historyofenglishpodcast.com/2014/10/23/episode-51-norse-words-and-a-new-english/

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  6. Grayson Perry: Beating the Bounds

    The award-winning artist Grayson Perry presents the 2013 BBC Reith Lectures, titled Playing to the Gallery. Across four programmes he discusses what makes him an artist, the limits of contemporary art, how to gauge the quality of new artworks and the future of the avant-garde.

    Grayson Perry questions the often-heard assertion that anything can be art, in a lecture recorded at St. George’s Hall in Liverpool.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/podcasts/series/reith

    —Huffduffed by lach

  7. Why read dictionaries? - Best of the Festivals - ABC Radio National (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

    In this delightful conversation two devoted students of the English language reveal their extraordinary understanding of words and their meanings. UK author Mark Forsyth is the author of two books about strange and beautiful and obscure words that have slipped from general usage. David Astle is an Australian author, columnist and crossword maker with a cult following.

    Recorded at the 2013 Sydney Writers Festival.

    http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/bestoffestivals/bof-aug-18/4835658

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  8. Translating the Untranslatable : NPR

    Linguist Christopher J. Moore has made a career of searching out some of the world’s most "untranslatable" expressions — words from around the globe that defy an easy translation into English. Moore shares a few of his linguistic favorites from his new book In Other Words: A Language Lover’s Guide to the Most Intriguing Words Around the World.

    http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=4457805

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  9. Grayson Perry: Nice Rebellion, Welcome In!

    The award-winning artist Grayson Perry presents the 2013 BBC Reith Lectures, titled Playing to the Gallery. Across four programmes he discusses what makes him an artist, the limits of contemporary art, how to gauge the quality of new artworks and the future of the avant-garde.

    Can art still shock us or have we seen it all before? Speaking to an audience at The Guildhall in Londonderry, the artist Grayson Perry asks if revolution is a defining idea in art, or has it met its end?

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/podcasts/series/reith

    —Huffduffed by lach