Algorithms to Live By (Brian Christian at Designers + Geeks)

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  1. Brian Christian talks about ALGORITHMS TO LIVE BY

    An interview with Brian Christian, co-author with Tom Griffiths, of “ALGORITHMS TO LIVE BY: The Computer Science of Human Decisions,” published by Henry Holt and Company. This is an exploration of the interconnections between computer science and human activity. It is a perfect companion to Brain Christian’s previous book, “The Most Human Human.” This interview took place at The Elliott Bay Book Company in Seattle, Washington

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    Tagged with talk book en

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  2. How to think like a computer | Marketplace

    If you’re looking for a parking spot but the lot seems mostly full, your best bet, says computer scientist Brian Christian, is to "take anything starting 69 spots away" from the front of the store.Christian is the co-author of the book "Algorithms to Live by: The Computer Science of Human Decisions." In it, he explores how the algorithms used in our machines can be used to help organize our everyday lives, from navigating crowded parking lots to finding a spouse. Click the audio player above to hear Kai’s interview with him.  Follow Kai Ryssdal at @kairyssdal. 

    http://www.marketplace.org/2016/05/04/world/how-think-computer

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  3. Rationally Speaking | Official Podcast of New York City Skeptics - Current Episodes - RS 161 - Tom Griffiths and Brian Christian on “Algorithms to Live By”

    Julia chats with the authors of "Algorithms to Live By", about how to apply key algorithms from computer science to our real life problems. For example, deciding which apartment to rent, planning your career, and prioritizing your projects.

    In the process, they discuss the assumptions that underlie those algorithms (and what to do about the fact that those assumptions are inevitably violated by the messy real world), and why procrastination might actually be the right algorithm for the wrong problem.

    http://rationallyspeakingpodcast.org/show/rs-161-tom-griffiths-and-brian-christian-on-algorithms-to-li.html

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  4. Rationally Speaking | Official Podcast of New York City Skeptics - Current Episodes - RS 161 - Tom Griffiths and Brian Christian on “Algorithms to Live By”

    Julia chats with the authors of "Algorithms to Live By", about how to apply key algorithms from computer science to our real life problems. For example, deciding which apartment to rent, planning your career, and prioritizing your projects.

    In the process, they discuss the assumptions that underlie those algorithms (and what to do about the fact that those assumptions are inevitably violated by the messy real world), and why procrastination might actually be the right algorithm for the wrong problem.

    http://rationallyspeakingpodcast.org/show/rs-161-tom-griffiths-and-brian-christian-on-algorithms-to-li.html

    —Huffduffed by HeAniganist

  5. Deciding Which Computer ‘Algorithms to Live By’ | Forum | Forum | KQED

    From choosing a restaurant to buying a home, computers help us make a lot of decisions. Authors Brian Christian and Tom Griffiths say, computer algorithms can

    http://ww2.kqed.org/forum/2016/05/13/deciding-which-computer-algorithms-to-live-by/

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  6. The Most Human Human: A Defence of Humanity in the Age of the Computer

    Author Brian Christian will talk on the subject of his debut book The Most Human Human a superbly engaging re-evaluation of what it means to be human in the light of breathtaking advances in artificial intelligence.

    Brian Christian is an Author and Poet. He holds a dual degree in computer science and philosophy and an MFA in poetry.

    http://www2.lse.ac.uk/newsAndMedia/videoAndAudio/channels/publicLecturesAndEvents/player.aspx?id=985

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  7. Brian Christian & Tom Griffiths: “Algorithms to Live By” | Talks at Google

    Practical, everyday advice which will easily provoke an interest in computer science.

    In a dazzlingly interdisciplinary work, acclaimed author Brian Christian and cognitive scientist Tom Griffiths show how the algorithms used by computers can also untangle very human questions. They explain how to have better hunches and when to leave things to chance, how to deal with overwhelming choices and how best to connect with others. From finding a spouse to finding a parking spot, from organizing one’s inbox to understanding the workings of memory, Algorithms to Live By transforms the wisdom of computer science into strategies for human living.

    Brian Christian is the author of The Most Human Human, a Wall Street Journal bestseller, New York Times editors’ choice, and a New Yorker favorite book of the year. His writing has appeared in The New Yorker, The Atlantic, Wired, The Wall Street Journal, The Guardian, and The Paris Review, as well as in scientific journals such as Cognitive Science, and has been translated into eleven languages. He lives in San Francisco.

    Tom Griffiths is a professor of psychology and cognitive science at UC Berkeley, where he directs the Computational Cognitive Science Lab. He has published more than 150 scientific papers on topics ranging from cognitive psychology to cultural evolution, and has received awards from the National Science Founda…

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  8. Brian Christian: Algorithms to Live By - The Long Now

    Solving hard decisions

    Deciding when to stop your quest for the ideal apartment, or ideal spouse, depends entirely on how long you expect to be looking, says Brian Christian.

    The first one you check will be the best you’ve seen, but it’s unlikely to be the best you’ll ever see.

    So you keep looking and keep finding new bests, though ever less frequently, and you start to wonder if maybe you refused the very best you’ll ever find.

    And the search is wearing you down.

    When should you take the leap and look no further?

    The answer from computer science is precise: 37% of the way through your search period.

    If you’re spending a month looking for an apartment, you should calibrate (and be sorely tempted) for 11 days, and then you should grab the next best-of-all you find.

    Likewise with the search for a mate.

    If you’re looking from, say, age 18 to 40, the time to shift from browsing and having fun to getting serious and proposing is at age 26.1.

    (However, if you’re getting lots of refusals, “propose early and often” from age 23.5.

    Or, if you can always go back to an earlier prospect, you could carry on exploring to age 34.4.)

    This “Optimal Stopping” is one of twelve subjects examined in Christian’s (and co-author Tom Griffiths’) book, Algorithms to Live By.

    (The other subjects are: Explore/Exploit; Sorting; Caching; Scheduling; Bayes’ Rule; Overfitting; Relaxation; Randomness; Networking; Game Theory; and Computational Kindness.

    An instance of Bayes’ Rule, called the Copernican Principle, lets you predict how long something of unknown lifespan will last into the future by assuming you’re looking at the middle of its duration—hence the USA, now 241 years old, might be expected to last through 2257.)

    Christian went into detail on the Explore/Exploit problem.

    Optimism minimizes regret.

    You’ve found some restaurants you really like.

    How often should you exploit that knowledge for a guaranteed good meal, and how often should you optimistically take a chance and explore new places to eat?

    The answer, again, depends partly on the interval of time involved.

    When you’re new in town, explore like mad.

    If you’re about to leave a city, stick with the known favorites.

    Infants with 80 years ahead are pure exploration— they try tasting everything.

    Old people, drawing on 70 years of experience, have every reason to pare the friends they want to spend time with down to a favored few.

    The joy of the young is discovering.

    The joy of the old is relishing.

           —Stewart Brand

    http://longnow.org/seminars/02016/jun/20/algorithms-live/

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  9. Triangulation 306: Ali Almossawi: Bad Choices

    Ali Almossawi is the author of An Illustrated Book of Bad Arguments. His latest book is Bad Choices: How Algorithms Can Help You Think Smarter and Live Happier. He talks with Leo Laporte about his unique style of explaining algorithms and algorithmic thinking.

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    Tagged with technology

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  10. ProPublica Reveals Discriminatory Pricing By Computer Algorithms : NPR

    We are relying more and more on machines to make decisions for us — which route to take, what to buy and where to buy it — but we have no idea how these decisions are made. NPR’s Robert Siegel talks with Julia Angwin, a ProPublica reporter, who has spent the year with her team looking at algorithms companies use to decide everything from what headlines we will read to what we will pay for a product. Among her most surprising findings, Asians were nearly twice as likely to get that higher price on SAT prep courses from The Princeton Review than non-Asians.

    http://www.npr.org/2016/10/19/498582157/propublica-reveals-discriminatory-pricing-by-computer-algorithms

    —Huffduffed by abrin