Food + Science = Victory! (Rebroadcast) - Freakonomics Freakonomics

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  1. The Demonization of Gluten (Ep. 305) - Freakonomics Freakonomics

    Celiac disease is thought to affect roughly one percent of the population. The good news: it can be treated by quitting gluten. The bad news: many celiac patients haven’t been diagnosed. The weird news: millions of people without celiac disease have quit gluten – which may be a big mistake.

    http://freakonomics.com/podcast/demonization-gluten/

    —Huffduffed by jonny

  2. Why You Shouldn’t Open a Restaurant (Ep. 347)

    Kenji Lopez-Alt became a rock star of the food world by bringing science into the kitchen in a way that everyday cooks can appreciate. Then he dared to start his own restaurant — and discovered problems that even science can’t solve.

    https://art19.com/shows/freakonomics-radio/episodes/07048f03-bb78-4d7e-93c1-3305ca8d62d2

    —Huffduffed by tjschuck

  3. Freakonomics Radio: Waiter, There’s a Physicist In My Soup, Part I

    “Waiter, There’s a Physicist in My Soup.” It’s the first segment of a two-parter about food and food science; it’s also about why we eat what we eat, and how that may change in the future. The first episode takes a look at the “molecular gastronomy” movement, which gets a big bump in visibility next month with the publication of a mammoth cookbook called Modernist Cuisine: The Art and Science of Cooking. Its principal author is Nathan Myhrvold, the former chief technology officer of Microsoft who now runs an invention company called Intellectual Ventures.

    —Huffduffed by nateb

  4. How to Become Great at Just About Anything - Freakonomics Freakonomics

    Season 6, Episode 11 This week on Freakonomics Radio: What if the thing we call “talent” is grotesquely overrated? And what if deliberate practice is the secret to excellence? Those are the claims of the research psychologist Anders Ericsson, who has been studying the science of expertise for decades. One idea you may have heard …

    http://freakonomics.com/podcast/become-great-just-anything/

    —Huffduffed by fcAcgeXdkLwMaM

  5. How American Food Got So Bad: A New Marketplace Podcast

    In our latest Freakonomics Radio on Marketplace podcast, Stephen Dubner and Kai Ryssdal talk about the unexpected reasons why American food got so bad. (Download/subscribe at iTunes, get the RSS feed, listen live via the media player above, or read the transcript.) In his forthcoming book An Economist Gets Lunch: New Rules for Everyday Foodies, economist Tyler Cowen pinpoints specific moments in history that affected American food for decades to come. From Prohibition to stringent immigration quotas to World War II, Cowen argues that large societal forces threw us into a food rut that lasted for roughly 70 years: COWEN: I think there is a very bad period for American food. It runs something like 1910 through maybe the 1980’s. And that’s the age of the frozen TV dinner, of the sugar donut, of fast food, of the chain, and really a lot of it is not very good. If you go back to the 19th century and you read Europeans who’ve come to the United States, they’re really quite impressed by the freshness and variety that is on offer. Cowen has put a lot of thought into how our food makes it to our plates, and his own meals are carefully considered, for sure; but don’t call him a food snob: COWEN: Let me just give you a few traits of food snobs that I would differ from. First, they tend to see commercialization as the villain. I tend to see commercialization as the savior. Second, they tend to construct a kind of good versus bad narrative where the bad guys are agribusiness, or corporations, or something like chains, or fast food, or microwaves. And I tend to see those institutions as flexible, as institutions that can respond, and as the institutions that actually fix the problem and make things better. So those would be two ways in which I’m not-only not a food snob, but I’m really on the other side of the debate.

    http://www.freakonomics.com/2011/12/14/how-american-food-got-so-bad-a-new-marketplace-podcast/

    —Huffduffed by KurtL

  6. How to Change Your Mind (Ep. 379) - Freakonomics Freakonomics

    There are a lot of barriers to changing your mind: ego, overconfidence, inertia — and cost. Politicians who flip-flop get mocked; family and friends who cross tribal borders are shunned. But shouldn’t we be encouraging people to change their minds? And how can we get better at it ourselves?

    http://freakonomics.com/podcast/change-your-mind/

    —Huffduffed by grankabeza