Kim Stanley Robinson at The Interval at Long Now | San Francisco

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  1. Track Changes: Talking with Kim Stanley Robinson about his global warming epic, New York 2140

    Imagining New York’s underwater future: this week Paul and Rich talk to Kim Stanley Robinson, one of the most renowned science fiction writers alive. The author of nineteen novels, he describes his newest,

    New York 2140, as both a “post-disaster novel” and a “comedy of coping,” set in a New York City several decades after sea levels have risen and stabilized. They discuss the city’s history, its natural and manmade spaces, and its inevitable future due to climate change: how the watery city will adapt, and who will make a profit.

    http://trackchanges.libsyn.com/talking-with-kim-stanley-robinson-about-his-global-warming-epic-new-york-2140

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  2. Kim Stanley Robinson “How Climate Will Evolve Government and Society”

    Kim Stanley Robinson at The Interval: Humanity’s adaptation to climate change will require novel, global cooperation and societal evolution. The award-winning science fiction author of 2312, the Mars Trilogy, and Aurora shares his vision for how the world must change in advance of his 02017 novel New York 2140. Hosted by Stewart Brand. From May 02016.

    Kim Stanley Robinson is an American novelist, widely recognized as one of the foremost living writers of science fiction. His work has been described as "humanist science fiction" and "literary science fiction." He has published more than 20 novels including his much honored "Mars trilogy",

    New York 2140

    (02017), and Red Moon due out in October 02018. Robinson has a B.A. in Literature from UC San Diego and an M.A. in English from Boston University. He earned a Ph.D. in literature from UCSD with a dissertation on the works of Philip K. Dick.

    https://theinterval.org/salon-talks/02016/may/10/how-climate-will-evolve-government-and-society

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  3. Apocalypse, Now - On The Media - WNYC

    Science fiction has always been an outlet for our greatest anxieties. This week, we delve into how the genre is exploring the reality of climate change. Plus: new words to describe the indescribable.

    1. Jeff VanderMeer @jeffvandermeer, author of the Southern Reach Trilogy and Borne, on writing about the relationships between people and nature.

    2. Claire Vaye Watkins @clairevaye talks about Gold Fame Citrus, her work of speculative fiction in which an enormous sand dune threatens to engulf the southwest.

    3. Kim Stanley Robinson discusses his latest work, New York 2140. The seas have risen 50 feet and lower Manhattan is submerged. And yet, there’s hope.

    4. British writer Robert Macfarlane @RobGMacfarlane on new language for our changing world.

    Throughout the show: listeners offer their own new vocabulary for the Anthropocene era. Many thanks to everyone who left us voice memos!

    http://www.wnyc.org/story/on-the-media-2017-07-07/

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  4. Kim Stanley Robinson Sees Humans Colonizing the Solar System in 2312

    In 1948, George Orwell looked ahead to 1984 and imagined a grim totalitarian world. In 1968, Arthur C. Clarke looked ahead to 2001 and imagined transcendent alien contact. Now, sci-fi novelist Kim Stanley Robinson is looking ahead 300 years in his new novel, 2312.

    http://www.wired.com/underwire/2012/06/geeks-guide-kim-stanley-robinson/

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  5. Episode 8: Fantastica, with George R.R. Martin and Kim Stanley Robinson

    Science fiction and fantasy have gone from the sidelines to the mainstream. We bring you a live conversation between two of the field’s living legends, George R.R. Martin (“A Song of Ice and Fire,” adapted for television as Game of Thrones, the Wild Card series) and Kim Stanley Robinson (New York 2140, the Mars trilogy), discussing their careers, the history of fantastic literature, and how it shapes our imagination. They came to the Clarke Center in support of the Clarion Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers Workshop (clarion.ucsd.edu), the premiere training and proving ground for emerging writers, which the Clarke Center organizes each summer with the Clarion Foundation.

    http://imagination.ucsd.edu/_wp/podcast/episode-8-fantastica-with-george-r-r-martin-and-kim-stanley-robinson/

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  6. Episode 63: Kim Stanley Robinson – The Conversation

    Kim Stanley Robinson is one of the biggest names in current science fiction. His most famous work is, arguably, the Mars Trilogy, but he is the author of seventeen novels and several collections of short stories. I could easily overburden you with biographical details and lists of his accolades, but I’ll leave that to this very comprehensive fan page.

    I learned about Stan through my interview with Tim Morton in 2012—they are friends and, at the time, both lived in Davis. It took a year but, when I next passed through Davis, I was fortunate enough to get three hours to sit down with Stan and talk about the future. I was especially interested in Stan’s work because he is an incredible researcher and regularly uses his fiction to explore a variety of plausible economic, scientific, ecological, and social futures. In other words, he uses fiction to ask many of the same questions that we have been asking our interviewees throughout the project. The result, I think, is one of the strongest and most wide-ranging interviews in The Conversation.

    http://www.findtheconversation.com/episode-63-kim-stanley-robinson/

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  7. 291: I Like Complicated Books, Glenn

    "Aurora" and "Luna: New Moon" - Our Book Club returns to read two recent, highly praised science fiction novels. From Kim Stanley Robinson comes “Aurora,” the story of a spaceship sent from Earth to a far-off star in a trip that will take generations. And from Ian McDonald comes “Luna: New Moon,” a sort of “Dallas” (or is it “The Godfather”?) set on and under the surface of the moon. Plus, what else are we reading?

    Host Jason Snell with Scott McNulty, Aleen Simms, Erika Ensign and Glenn Fleishman.

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  8. Storyboard Podcast: Sci-Fi Writer Kim Stanley Robinson Inhabits Space in 2312

    In his new novel 2312, legendary science fiction author Kim Stanley Robinson focuses on outer space and humans’ place in it.

    As you probably guessed from the title, the story is set three centuries in the future. It hinges on “the idea that the solar system is our neighborhood, and could be inhabited,” Robinson tells Wired Senior Editor Adam Rogers in this episode of the Storyboard podcast.

    In the book, which hits stores May 22, humans live not just on other planets, but also in miniature biomes in hollowed-out asteroids. Robinson’s oeuvre includes the Hugo-winning Mars trilogy and the global warming-focused Forty Signs of Rain. In the podcast, he talks about time travel, trips to Antarctica and the future of humanity.

    http://www.wired.com/underwire/2012/05/storyboard-kim-stanley-robinson-2312/

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  9. Kim Stanley Robinson In Conversation

    American science fiction writer, Kim Stanley Robinson, best known for his award winning "Mars" trilogy, joins Lucy Sussex at the Melbourne Writers Festival to discuss the inspiration for his work and the problems facing planet Earth.

    Robinson explains to his audience why it is important for everyone to know about science, especially in the face of the climate change crisis.

    It’s a subject very close to the author’s heart: virtually all of Robinson’s novels have an ecological component with sustainability being one of his major themes.

    Robinson also defends science fiction, believing it deserves more attention by literary awards such as the Booker Prize.

    After all, if one of his favourite authors Virginia Woolf was a science fiction fan, why can’t contemporary literary audiences appreciate the genre more?

    Kim Stanley Robinson is an American Science Fiction writer best known for the multi-award winning "Mars" trilogy.

    Other books include "The Years of Rice and Salt" and his latest book "Galileo’s Dream".

    In 2008 Kim Stanley Robinson was listed as the TIME "Hero of the Environment".

    Lucy Sussex is a New Zealand born writer, researcher and editor. Sussex has published many short stories and a few novels, including "The Scarlet Rider" which won the Ditmar, Best Novel in 1997. She currently writes a review column for "The West Australian" and "The Sunday Age".

    http://www.abc.net.au/tv/bigideas/stories/2010/10/12/3034904.htm

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