5 - Amanda Cohen and Adam Danforth - Meat and Veggie Showdown

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  1. Food tours and cooking classes

    It is quite amazing how popular food tours and cooking classes are in Italy. When in Rome, many people seem to want to eat, and cook, like a Roman. Well, not entirely, and not like some Romans. I spoke to Francesca Flore, who offers both tours and cooking classes, and she reserved some choice words for those quintessential Roman dishes based on the famous quinto quarto, the fifth quarter of the carcass. Or, less obtusely, offal.

    Francesca told me that she’s always been interested in food, and that while working in London she decided to take herself off to Australia to study Cooking and Patisserie at the Cordon Bleu School in Sydney. Back in Rome, she put all that knowledge to use catering private parties and branching out into food tours and cooking classes.

    We talked about what people want, what they get, and how she views the past and future of Italian food.

    http://www.eatthispodcast.com/food-tours-and-cooking-classes/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. Is This Food Racist?

    How do our assumptions about people affect our assumptions about their food? And how do their assumptions about our food affect how we feel about ourselves? What happens when chefs cook a cuisine they weren’t born into? And what happens when there’s a backlash? Our friend Dan Pashman, host of WNYC Studio’s The Sporkful, has launched a special series of episodes called "Other People’s Food," which aims to explore exactly these questions. Dan talks with Brooke about the project so far. 

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. S2E24: Every Part of the Pig with Camas Davis

    Colin Marshall sits down in Portland’s Pearl District with Camas Davis, food writer and founder of the Portland Meat Collective. They discuss why bacon has hit the zeitgeist so hard; her interest in fostering an "alternative economy of meat"; her former career writing travel pieces, which invariably and instinctively became food pieces; her education in the "meta-meta theoretical" exploration of food; how meat became cool again, after industrialization made it uncool (and not particularly tasty); her agreement with even the hardest-core animal-rights vegan about the horrors of industrial meat production; growing up in Eugene, where if you weren’t vegetarian, you weren’t cool; her return from vegetarianism to the meat-eating fold with a bacon meal while teaching in a women’s prison; how American got itself into an entitlement mentality about cheap meat thrice a day; the importance of killing animals we eat ourselves, and how she finds some people are better at it than others; her time studying in southwestern France, what exactly separates French eating culture from American, and how the French are just getting into some of what has made American food unpalatable in recent decades; all the surprising things you can do with a pig’s head; Portland’s food consciousness and food renaissance, and how they might serve as a bellwether for a countrywide shift in attitudes about eating; Portland’s suspicion of eateries that get "too big for their britches," which results in a certain elevated-comfort-food trademark cuisine; her butchery classes, in which she’s found far fewer obnoxious hipster foodies enrolling than she’d expected; our rightful fear of most meat, and the meat we need not be scared of; and whether America has many small food movements, or one big food movement.

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    Tagged with portland

    —Huffduffed by joanofdark

  4. Back to Work #76: The Avatar of Dorian Gray

    TOPICS: Better Meat & Working Backwards

    This week, Dan and Merlin talk about the many strategic and tactical benefits of reverse-engineering your next project.

    There is also extensive discussion of choosing, preparing, and cooking meat.

    It’s not food until is sounds like food and it smells like food.

    http://5by5.tv/b2w/76

    —Huffduffed by markpasc

  5. For London Chef, ‘Plenty’ To Love About Vegetables : NPR

    Israeli-born chef Yotam Ottolenghi’s new cookbook, Plenty, draws from his column for London’s Guardian newspaper, "The New Vegetarian." The chef himself isn’t a vegetarian, but the recipes,which showcase his Middle Eastern and Mediterranean background, include no meat.

    http://www.npr.org/2011/06/26/137402727/for-london-chef-plenty-to-love-about-vegetables

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. Clean Your Grill, And Other Hot Holiday Tips From Food Network’s Alton Brown : The Salt : NPR

    If there’s one grilling tip to remember this Memorial Day weekend, it should be this: Flame is bad. Whether you’re barbecuing OR grilling, a meat-eater or a vegetarian, here’s how to keep your flavor from going up in smoke.

    http://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/2012/05/26/153718482/clean-your-grill-and-other-hot-holiday-tips-from-food-networks-alton-brown

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. Esquire Magazine Food Critic John Mariani —€” How ‘Italian Food’ Became A Global Sensation : NPR

    Twenty years ago, Italian food was regarded as cheap, peasant food. Now it’s served on menus worldwide and considered to be one of the healthiest cuisines. Esquire Magazine’s food critic John Mariani chronicles the story of pizza, macaroni and red sauce in How Italian Food Conquered the World.

    http://www.npr.org/2011/03/24/134628158/how-italian-food-became-a-global-sensation

    —Huffduffed by adactio