On The Media: Building Hype

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  1. Forensic Architecture - when buildings become evidence.

    A team of specialist researchers at the University of London have developed a new sub-discipline of architecture, reconstructing buildings after conflict or catastrophe. Forensic Architecture creates online models which are used in court. Their work is also exhibited for public viewing. The New York Times adopted the agency’s methods in its reporting of the 2017 mass shooting in Las Vegas. The agency has made such a mark that it is on the shortlist for this year’s Turner prize for visual art. Sarah Nankivell explains the art of Forensic Architecture.

    http://www.radionz.co.nz/national/programmes/ninetonoon/audio/2018645123/forensic-architecture-when-buildings-become-evidence

    —Huffduffed by tingbo

  2. Acoustic architecture

    How does music speak to the buildings that house it?

    Music has always been a conversation with its environment, but from the 15th Century on, the craft became much more deliberate. And acoustic architecture has changed a lot since Dufay and the Gabrielis were composing their choral works for the Basilicas of Italy.

    Palaces, cathedrals, concert halls all got the bespoke treatment from composers like Bach and Beethoven. But as we reach the 20th Century and the machine-age, a different sonic logic starts to work. While the tradition was still maintained by people like Benjamin Britten, new minds like Edgard Varèse started to see other parallels between architecture and music. By the time we get to Iannis Xenakis, the architect-turned-composer, the idea of music and structure start to merge.

    And today the disciplines of architecture and music are spawning brand new hybrids—architects design music—musicians perform buildings.

    So, would you like to live in my song?

    http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/intothemusic/acoustic-architecture/4969332

    —Huffduffed by lach

  3. Great Australian buildings: The Shine Dome - Blueprint for Living - ABC Radio National (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

    A Canberra landmark since 1959, the Shine Dome at ANU is sometimes referred to by locals as ‘The Martian Embassy’. It’s easy to see why: the space age, 710-tonne concrete dome houses the Australian Academy of Science. Colin Bisset takes a look around.

    http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/blueprintforliving/great-australian-buildings-the-shine-dome/7451652

    —Huffduffed by mpacker

  4. School of Life: A Very Bad YouTube Channel

    The School of Life is a bad channel with bad videos on it, imo.

    Support me on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/bigjoel Follow me on Twitch: https://www.twitch.tv/biggestjoel Follow me on Twitter: https://twitter.com/biggestjoel

    Footnote on architecture: So, I want to be a bit specific here. I’m not claiming that modernism had NO impact on architecture, that would be silly. But this video makes a far more ambitious point: That modernism’s effect on architecture was SPECIFICALLY that it inspired architects to build less expensive and aesthetically appealing buildings. And I’m totally unsure of why we’d think that. These capitalists weren’t planning on building small, stone or wood buildings in the first place, that was never their plan. They were going to build large skyscrapers and factories, whether the modernists liked it or not. And sure, aesthetic concerns were relevant, but are we really claiming that the budget for these buildings would have been way higher had modernism never become a movement? If people hadn’t "decided" that art was subjective? Seems unbelievably ridiculous to me, and I’d like to see at least SOME proof of it. I have looked into it for this video and found nothing, but feel free to send me sources showing that I’m wrong here. The weirdest example of this in the video, that I…

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    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JlkJJygIoVU
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    Tagged with film & animation

    —Huffduffed by Faikus

  5. Iain Sinclair and Patrick Wright: Living with Buildings | Events | London Review Bookshop

    In Living With Buildings, Iain Sinclair embarks on a series of expeditions – through London, Marseille, Mexico and the Outer Hebrides. He explores the relationship between sickness and structure, and between art, architecture, social planning and health, taking plenty of detours along the way. Walking is Sinclair’s defensive magic against illness and, as he moves, he observes his surroundings: stacked tower blocks and behemoth estates; halogen-lit glasshouse offices and humming hospitals; the blackened hull of a Spitalfields church and the floating mass of Le Corbusier’s radiant city.

    Sinclair was in conversation with Patrick Wright, Professor of Literature and Visual & Material Culture, Kings College London.

    https://www.londonreviewbookshop.co.uk/events/past/2018/9/iain-sinclair-and-patrick-wright-living-with-buildings

    —Huffduffed by lach

  6. Information architecture patterns

    We have patterns for buildings, patterns for interaction design, and patterns for software development. But are there patterns for information architecture? Of course there are - patterns emerge from use, and there certainly are enough information architectures around to identify a set of patterns.This presentation will describe a wide range of commonly-used information architecture patterns, including hierarchies small and large, different types of database structure, hypertext, subsite models, sites with multiple entry points and ways of combining these. For each Donna will describe the core elements of the pattern, discuss the most appropriate uses and show real-world examples. Understanding the different patterns will help attendees to select the most appropriate structures for their content.

    —Huffduffed by skillswap

  7. Information architecture patterns

    We have patterns for buildings, patterns for interaction design, and patterns for software development. But are there patterns for information architecture? Of course there are - patterns emerge from use, and there certainly are enough information architectures around to identify a set of patterns.This presentation will describe a wide range of commonly-used information architecture patterns, including hierarchies small and large, different types of database structure, hypertext, subsite models, sites with multiple entry points and ways of combining these. For each Donna will describe the core elements of the pattern, discuss the most appropriate uses and show real-world examples. Understanding the different patterns will help attendees to select the most appropriate structures for their content.

    —Huffduffed by briansuda

  8. Ballardian Architecture, Royal Academy of Arts - John Gray lecture

    Lectures delivered at the symposium Ballardian Architecture: Inner and Outer Space, held at the Royal Academy of Arts on 15 May 2010.

    John Gray’s lecture discusses the latent and manifest content of spaces and buildings, comparing Guy Debord’s notion of the spectacle and Ballard’s investigation of celebrity culture.

    —Huffduffed by Kevan

  9. Kengo Kuma podcast and image gallery - Architecture Programme - Royal Academy of Arts

    Celebrated Japanese architect Kengo Kuma delivered the Royal Academy’s 2008 Annual Architecture Lecture on 14 July. In recent years Kuma has designed a number of projects in Europe, including the Sake No Hana restaurant in London. Most of his work however remains in Asia. With their exquisite control of surface, which can be transparent, opaque, reflective, sliced or solid, his buildings offer different ways of appreciating their site and through that appreciation to engage in contemplation of ideas or objects within them. The Annual Architecture Lecture is proudly supported by John Robertson Architects and the Japanese Committee of Honour of the Royal Academy of Arts.

    http://www.royalacademy.org.uk/architecture/kengo-kuma-podcast-and-image-gallery,656,AR.html

    —Huffduffed by plindberg