Designing the future - Tech Weekly podcast

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  1. dConstruct 2015: Ingrid Burrington

    Jeremy and Ingrid geek out together on the physical infrastructure of the internet, time travel narratives, and William Gibson’s The Peripheral (contains a spoiler warning, but no actual spoilers).

    http://2015.dconstruct.org/

    Ingrid Burrington writes, makes maps, and tells jokes on a small island off the coast of America. She’s a member of Deep Lab, the author of Networks of New York: An Internet Infrastructure Field Guide, and currently an artist in residence at the Data and Society Research Institute.

    http://2015.dconstruct.org/speaker/ingrid-burrington

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. dConstruct 2015: Nick Foster

    Jeremy and Nick discuss the details of design fiction, and talk about the need for a mundane futurism, which leads them to compare notes on the differences between Derby and Silicon Valley.

    http://2015.dconstruct.org/

    Nick Foster ​is and industrial designer, futurist​, film-maker and writer. He graduated from the Royal College of ​A​r​t​ in 2001 ​and worked for companies including Sony, Seymourpowell and Nokia. In​ 2012 ​he moved to California ​to take a role as ​creative lead for Nokia’s Advanced Design ​studio​. ​He currently ​w​orks​ with a brilliant team in Mountain View​ to help define the next generation of Google products.​ Nick is also a partner at the Near Future Laboratory, developing projects in the field of ​design fiction, speculative and critical futures.

    http://2015.dconstruct.org/speaker/nick-foster

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct

  3. dConstruct 2015: Carla Diana

    Carla answers Jeremy’s questions on product design, teaching, prototyping, and whether 3D printing has finally "arrived."

    http://2015.dconstruct.org/

    Carla Diana is a hybrid designer keenly focused on realising new visions for Smart Objects and the Internet of Things. In addition to her industry experience at some of the world’s top design firms, such as frog Design and Smart Design, Carla maintains strategic alliances with a number of academic research groups. She is a member of the Georgia Tech Socially Intelligent Machines Lab, and a faculty member at the School of Visual Arts and the University of Pennsylvania’s Integrated Product Design Program, where she developed the first course on Smart Objects. She is Advisor for the group Tomorrow-Lab, a young design firm that creates electro-mechanical solutions for smart devices and she continues work as a Fellow at Smart Design, where she oversees the Smart Interaction Lab.

    Carla’s recent article, “Talking, Walking Objects”, appeared on the cover of the New York Times Sunday Review in January 2013, and is a good representation of her view of our robotic future. She has just completed a children’s book for Maker Media about the future of 3D printing and design entitled LEO the Maker Prince.

    http://2015.dconstruct.org/speaker/carla-diana

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct

  4. One-On-One Conversations: Ingrid Burrington and James Bridle

    The first in this series features James Bridle and Ingrid Burrington, discussing "The Black Chamber". As technology advances and becomes increasingly networked and integrated with our daily lives, it tends towards a greater invisibility, a seamlessness and an unreadability. From the Cipher Bureau to Room 641A, from the datacenter to the iPhone, from the drone command module to the shipping container, the black boxes of the network litter the contemporary landscape. Unable to see inside them, we construct fantasies about their use, develop new ways of thinking about them, and attempt to probe them through techniques legal, technical, and magical. Eyebeam Residents Ingrid Burrington and James Bridle will explore the aesthetic and imaginative space of the black box, and outline some of their own practices for approaching them. http://anything2mp3.com/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. Eyebeam: James Bridle and Ingrid Burrington

    The first in this series features James Bridle and Ingrid Burrington, discussing "The Black Chamber". As technology advances and becomes increasingly networked and integrated with our daily lives, it tends towards a greater invisibility, a seamlessness and an unreadability. From the Cipher Bureau to Room 641A, from the datacenter to the iPhone, from the drone command module to the shipping container, the black boxes of the network litter the contemporary landscape. Unable to see inside them, we construct fantasies about their use, develop new ways of thinking about them, and attempt to probe them through techniques legal, technical, and magical. Eyebeam Residents Ingrid Burrington and James Bridle will explore the aesthetic and imaginative space of the black box, and outline some of their own practices for approaching them.

    —Huffduffed by lot49a

  6. Mindful Cyborgs - Episode 63 - Occulted and Embedded: Magick in the Internet and Security Agencies with Ingrid Burrington

    Episode 63 - Guest Ingrid Burrington comes on to share some of her recent work on the intersection of the occult and tech. Hint: there is more than you think.

    —Huffduffed by millerdl

  7. Designing the Future Through Tangible Storytelling

    As designers, new technologies are always capturing our imaginations, but in order to become part of our everyday life they need be introduced through human contexts and meaningful stories. In this talk, IoT expert and “maker-futurist” Carla Diana will share methods and strategies for new product visions based on vivid storytelling and tangible model making, looking at techniques such as scenario storyboarding, video narratives and vision imagery. She’ll share case studies from recent product design projects as well as experiments from her design lab work to showcase ways that near future technologies can be embraced as compelling ideas for new types of everyday products.

    http://2015.dconstruct.org/speaker/carla-diana

    Carla Diana is a hybrid designer keenly focused on realising new visions for Smart Objects and the Internet of Things. In addition to her industry experience at some of the world’s top design firms, such as frog Design and Smart Design, Carla maintains strategic alliances with a number of academic research groups. She is a member of the Georgia Tech Socially Intelligent Machines Lab, and a faculty member at the School of Visual Arts and the University of Pennsylvania’s Integrated Product Design Program, where she developed the first course on Smart Objects. She is Advisor for the group Tomorrow-Lab, a young design firm that creates electro-mechanical solutions for smart devices and she continues work as a Fellow at Smart Design, where she oversees the Smart Interaction Lab.

    Carla’s recent article, “Talking, Walking Objects”, appeared on the cover of the New York Times Sunday Review in January 2013, and is a good representation of her view of our robotic future. She has just completed a children’s book for Maker Media about the future of 3D printing and design entitled LEO the Maker Prince.

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct

  8. The Future Mundane

    Design projects fall into three distinct categories: now, next and future. For near-term projects the design industry has developed and refined a variety of processes, but when approaching ideas for the future, things begin to fall apart. Designers are left to wander aimlessly between science fiction cinema, futurist literature and technology digests, and it’s clear from their output that something is amiss. Current sources of inspiration have their uses, but they often pull the designer in unhelpful directions, blinding them to the realities of a world to come. The future will include spacecraft, artificial skin and self-driving vehicles, but it will also include garbage, staplers and milk. It will be, in a very real sense, mundane. You will not be a hero. You will inherit furniture. Your morning will be spoiled when your toaster fails to sync with your bread app…

    Nick will introduce an approach which looks at the role of the mundane in building a view of the future, and how experimenting with format and delivery we can make the future more tangible and achievable. It’s more fun than it sounds.

    http://2015.dconstruct.org/speaker/nick-foster

    Nick Foster ​is and industrial designer, futurist​, film-maker and writer. He graduated from the Royal College of ​A​r​t​ in 2001 ​and worked for companies including Sony, Seymourpowell and Nokia. In​ 2012 ​he moved to California ​to take a role as ​creative lead for Nokia’s Advanced Design ​studio​. ​He currently ​w​orks​ with a brilliant team in Mountain View​ to help define the next generation of Google products.​ Nick is also a partner at the Near Future Laboratory, developing projects in the field of ​design fiction, speculative and critical futures.

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct

  9. BBC: Click — Brighton Digital Festival

    How digital technology affects our lives around the world.

    Gareth Mitchell and Bill Thompson travel to the south coast of England for the first ever Brighton Digital Festival. It is an event that brings together hackers, digital artists and technophiles to explore the realms of digital technology. Hackers from a Mini Maker Faire demonstrate how they have repurposed various bits of old gadgetry. Click also hears from Honor Harger one of the organisers of the festival about the big questions that are being posed about our information society and where it is all going. Aral Balkan from Update joins the discussion to reflect on how companies need to make the various gadgets and digital tools more attractive for us to use. And there is a report on the plethora of digital art at the festival including the internationally renowned Blast Theory and Katy Connor’s Pure Flow.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/podcasts/series/digitalp

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  10. Haunted Machines: Ingrid Burrington

    Artist and writer Ingrid Burrington looked at where we can reclaim the narratives of magic from those uses that relinquish our power over the technology we use. How do institutions of power invoke magic to deny their accountability for their actions, and how can we keep magic as something hopeful?
    A mini-conference inside FutureEverything 2015, hosted and guest curated by artist and designer Tobias Revell, and FutureEverything’s Natalie Kane, Haunted Machines reflected on the narratives of magic and hauntings pervading our relationship with technology and began to analyse why these narratives exist, what they mean and what they do. FutureEverything 20th Anniversary Festival: 25-28 February 2015 Manchester Town Hall futureeverything.org

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    Original video: https://vimeo.com/123926342
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/

    —Huffduffed by samuelhansen