Kristen Miglore and Merrill Stubbs | Food52: Genius Recipes: 100 Recipes That Will Change the Way You Cook

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  1. Gourmands Through The Ages: ‘A History Of Food In 100 Recipes’ : The Salt : NPR

    From ancient Egyptian bakers to Gordon Ramsay, every era has its foodies. And without them, the history of food would be pretty darn boring, says William Sitwell. His new book chronicles how these epicures shaped our palates, and the recipes they left behind.

    http://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/2013/06/20/193583621/gourmands-through-the-ages-a-history-of-food-in-100-recipes

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. A Taste of the Past - Episode 140 - A History of Food in 100 Recipes

    William Sitwell, author of A History of Food in 100 Recipes, joins Linda Pelaccio for this week’s episode of A Taste of the Past to talk about the evolution of the food industry over hundreds of years. Tune in to hear William talk about the initiation of fast food and supermarkets, and how the idea of self-service mechanized the business of eating. From Mesopotamia to Mario Batali, William highlights and reproduces important recipes in order to transport the reader to specific time periods. How do different foods denote status? Learn about William’s literary lineage, and how that inspired his writing. How did William decide to outline his book, and why does food history research require primary sources? Find out all of this and more on this week’s edition of A Taste of the Past! Thanks to our sponsor, Hearst Ranch, and thanks to Plexophonic for today’s break music.

    ‘Food is a wonderful subject for journalists because it touches on so many aspects of everyone’s lives.’ [3:30]

    — William Sitwell on A Taste of the Past

    http://www.heritageradionetwork.com/episodes/4363-A-Taste-of-the-Past-Episode-140-A-History-of-Food-in-100-Recipes

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. App-etizing: Cookbooks And Recipes Go Mobile : NPR

    If there’s one kind of book that you’d think might be safe from the digital revolution it’s the cookbook.

    It’s hard to imagine how the Web could replicate a cookbook’s well-organized recipes or enticing illustrations — and, of course, a book doesn’t freeze or short out after a cooking accident. And cookbooks make the perfect gift for the foodie on anyone’s list, which is why they’re a mainstay of publishing at this time of year.

    But though the traditional cookbook is alive and well, a number of tech-savvy cooks believe that e-books and iPad apps are a boon for the industry — and could provide cooks with more creative and convenient ways to find the right recipes.

    http://www.npr.org/2010/12/16/132082822/app-etizing-cookbooks-and-recipes-go-mobile?sc=fb&cc=fp

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. Food tours and cooking classes

    It is quite amazing how popular food tours and cooking classes are in Italy. When in Rome, many people seem to want to eat, and cook, like a Roman. Well, not entirely, and not like some Romans. I spoke to Francesca Flore, who offers both tours and cooking classes, and she reserved some choice words for those quintessential Roman dishes based on the famous quinto quarto, the fifth quarter of the carcass. Or, less obtusely, offal.

    Francesca told me that she’s always been interested in food, and that while working in London she decided to take herself off to Australia to study Cooking and Patisserie at the Cordon Bleu School in Sydney. Back in Rome, she put all that knowledge to use catering private parties and branching out into food tours and cooking classes.

    We talked about what people want, what they get, and how she views the past and future of Italian food.

    http://www.eatthispodcast.com/food-tours-and-cooking-classes/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. Food Transformers: Reimagining Food Traditions - SXSW Interactive/Film 2016

    Three nationally-acclaimed, dynamic chefs share their inspiration for how they have transformed time-honored food traditions into hot tastes for today’s palates. Food writer and culinary network star Virginia Willis transforms classic-but-heavy southern recipes into healthful and wholesome by re-imagining ingredients while keeping Southern charm and appeal. Austin chef / DJ, Tatsu Aikawa (co-owner of Ramen Tatsu-Ya) infuses time-honored ramen-making techniques into a mash-up of inventive ramen dishes. Chef Michael Fojtasek (co-owner of Olamaie, Eater National’s 21 Best New Restaurants) transforms five generations of Southern cooking traditions into Modern Southern Cuisine.

    https://soundcloud.com/officialsxsw/food-transformers-reimagining-food-traditions-sxsw-interactivefilm-2016

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. Recipes from “Food Matters” by Mark Bittman

    Food writer and home cooking guide Mark Bittman is a hero in many American kitchens. His “How to Cook Everything” has put a lot of meals on a lot of family tables.

    Now, Bittman is taking up a bigger cause than dinner: The way Americans eat, he says, is killing themselves and the planet. Too much meat. Too much junk food. Too big a footprint.

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    Tagged with food

    —Huffduffed by erinjo