Did science fiction predict the future of journalism?

Possibly related…

  1. The Future of the Future

    How does the accelerating pace of technology change the way we think about the future?

    It’s said that science fiction writers now spend more time telling stories about today than about tomorrow, because the potential of existing technology to change our world is so rich that there is no need to imagine the future - it’s already here. Does this mean the future is dead? Or that we are experiencing a profound shift in our understanding of what the future means to us, how it arrives, and what forces will shape it?

    Presenters Timandra Harkness and Leo Johnson explore how our evolving understanding of time and the potential of technological change are transforming the way we think about the future.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b08nqc4j

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. Future Sci-Fi - RN Future Tense - 27 January 2011

    Russian/American scientist and author, Isaac Asimov, once wrote: Individual science fiction stories may seem as trivial as ever to the blinder critics and philosophers of today — but the core of science fiction, its essence, has become crucial to our salvation if we are to be saved at all.

    Now, there’s no denying science fiction has long been a popular genre — from print to television to film. But does it have the influence it once had?

    Some argue the exponential rate of technological change makes sci-fi less effective in its ability to predict, inspire and shape the future of the real world.

    Here at Future Tense we’re starting the year with a look at the power of science fiction.

    —Huffduffed by imsmi

  3. Robots and Media: Science Fiction, Anime, Transmedia, and Technology | MIT Comparative Media Studies

    Ian Condry, Associate Director of MIT Comparative Media Studies and Associate Professor of Foreign Languages and Literatures, will discuss the prevalence of giant robots in anime (Japanese animated films and TV shows). From the sixties to the present, robot or "mecha" anime has evolved in ways that reflect changing business models and maturing audiences, as can be seen in titles like Astro Boy, Gundam, Macross, and Evangelion. How can we better understand the emergence of anime as a global media phenomenon through the example of robot anime? What does this suggest about our transmedia future?

    Cynthia Breazeal, Associate Professor at the MIT Media Lab and founder/director of the Lab’s Personal Robots Group, will discuss how science fiction has influenced the development of real robotic systems, both in research laboratories and corporations all over the world. She will explore of how science fiction has shaped ideas of the relationship and role of robots in human society, how the existence of such robots is feeding back into science fiction narratives, and how we might experience transmedia properties in the future using robotic technologies.

    http://cms.mit.edu/news/2010/03/podcast_robots_and_media_scien.php

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. Design Fiction by Britt Wray (from PRX)

    What does it mean to design technology that doesn’t exist…yet? This type of design exists, and it takes its inspiration from Science Fiction. They call it…Design Fiction.

    This story is about how design fiction imagines and shapes future technologies, featuring transmedia futurist Trevor Haldenby and engineer/philosopher Julian Bleecker.

    http://www.prx.org/pieces/94905-design-fiction#description

    —Huffduffed by zzot

  5. We need to talk about… the future of journalism | Membership | The Guardian

    Guardian supporters pose the questions as The Guardian’s editor-in-chief, Katharine Viner, discusses the challenges facing journalism and her vision for the Guardian. Hosted by The Guardian’s joint political editor, Heather Stewart

    https://www.theguardian.com/membership/audio/2018/feb/21/we-need-to-talk-about-future-journalism-viner

    —Huffduffed by grankabeza

  6. At MIT, an ethics class for inventors

    MIT’s Media Lab makes a strong claim to being the place where the future is designed. A class called Science Fiction to Science Fabrication, taught by researchers Dan Novy and Sophia Brueckner, makes that connection direct by using science fiction as an inspiration for real-world inventions.

    Sci-fi is full of imagined technologies, some plausible (killer robots), some far-out (time-traveling DeLoreans). Students in this class mine the work of authors like Philip K. Dick, Isaac Asimov, J. G. Ballard, Ray Bradbury, and William Gibson for ideas, such as an empathy testing machine like the one used to identify androids in Blade Runner.

    But most science fiction writers aren’t advocating that we build their technologies; they’re asking how we would use, or misuse, them. That’s exactly why Brueckner and Novy decided to put science fiction in front of the students at the MIT Media Lab. “Reading science fiction is kind of like ethics class for inventors,” says Brueckner. Traditionally, technology schools ask ‘how do we build it?’ This class asks a different question: ‘should we?’

    Novy adds, “With the ability of any technology or application to go viral over the planet in 24 hours, I think it is even more important to think about what you’re doing before you release it into the wild.”

    http://www.studio360.org/story/at-mit-ethics-class-for-inventors/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. 95- Future Screens are Mostly Blue | 99% Invisible

    We have seen the future, and the future is mostly blue.

    Or, put another way: in our representations of the future in science fiction movies, blue seems to be the dominant color of our interfaces with technology yet to come. And that is one of the many design lessons we can learn from sci-fi.

    Designers and sci-fi aficionados Chris Noessel and Nathan Shedroff have spent years compiling real-world lessons that designers can, should, and already do take from science fiction. Their new book, Make It So: Interaction Design Lessons From Science Fiction is a comprehensive compendium of their findings.

    All music (after pledge preamble) is by OK Ikumi.

    Podcast: Download (Duration: 24:49 — 22.8MB)

    http://99percentinvisible.prx.org/2013/11/21/95-future-screens-are-mostly-blue/

    —Huffduffed by adactio