CHI 2014 Scott Jensen Keynote: The Physical Web

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  1. Designing for the Future, pt 4: The Physical Web, with Scott Jenson | Fresh Tilled Soil

    On this episode we have the great pleasure of sitting down with Google’s Product Lead for the Physical Web, Scott Jenson. We discuss the Internet of Things, how Scott much hates it (the term), and where we think this whole thing is headed.

    http://www.freshtilledsoil.com/designing-for-the-future-pt-4-the-physical-web-with-scott-jenson/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. Native Apps are not the Future with Scott Jenson | The Breaking Development Podcast

    Fresh Squeezed Mobile is Breaking Development’s channel to get fresh ideas out there about mobile web development and design.

    This week we talk to Scott Jenson about the future of mobile, Internet of Things, connected devices, Internet connected toasters and infrastructure policy.

    http://fsm.bdconf.com/podcast/native-apps-are-not-the-future-with-scott-jenson

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. The Physical Web is a Speed Issue - Scott Jenson

    From Velocity Amsterdam 2015: The Physical Web is an approach to unleash the core superpower of the web: interaction on demand. People should be able to walk up to any smart device – a vending machine, a poster, a toy, a bus stop, a rental car – and not have to download an app first. Everything should be just a tap away.

    Why is this important? The number of smart devices is going to explode, and the assumption that each new device will require its own application just isn’t realistic. We need a system that lets anyone interact with any device at any time. The Physical Web isn’t about replacing native apps: it’s about enabling interaction when native apps just aren’t practical.

    Why is this open source? The Physical Web must be an open standard that everyone can use. By creating a common web standard that any device can use to offer interaction, a new range of services becomes possible.

    How does this change things? Once any smart device can have a web address, the entire overhead of an app seems a bit backward. The Physical Web approach unlocks tiny use cases that would never be practical: - A cat collar would let you call to find the owner - A bus tells you its next stop - Parking meters can pay in the cloud using the phone’s internet connection - Any store, no matter how small, can offer an online experience when you walk in - A ZipCar broadcasts a signup page,…

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    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7H_E_ZbFAn0
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/

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  4. Google - Scott Jenson Interview

    Google’s Scott Jenson, leader of the Physical Web project, on Google’s announcement to move Physical Web from Chrome directly into Android, he shares numbers on Bluetooth activation in Android and deals with concerns about Google controlling the Physical Web proxy.

    For more interviews and articles from the author of The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Beacosystem checkout http://www.hhgb.us For the most comprehensive proximity industry directory and report checkout https://www.proxbook.com/reports.

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    Original video: https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=UbL7j7mvM9A&time_continue=1076&ebc=ANyPxKp0j5Q-Xfp7D1JtvR0cXgfUtiORJS4X_R_O6rGIThywtMrYpW0ERXqDUOnJoR9nqklT6_aaFdY6Wuzi0Z8UjYKMSPJj8A
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/

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  5. Introduction to the Physical Web (100 days of Google Dev)

    Scott Jenson introduces the Physical Web. The Physical Web is an extension of the web into the physical world so you can walk up and interact with any device, from a lost dog collar to a zipCar, all without installing an application first. Every smart device links to a web page so things can offer simple information, like a phone number, or more complex interactions like unlocking a car door. With the Physical Web, your phone or tablet can find the things around you and let you interact with whatever you’re interested in.

    More information:

    http://github.com/google/physical-web

    Subscribe to the Google Developers channel at: http://goo.gl/mQyv5L

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    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1yaLPRgtlR0
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/

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  6. Why Mobile Apps Must Die

    Mobile apps are on a clear trajectory for failure. It’s just not possible to have an app for every device in my house, every product I own and every store I enter. Much like Yahoos original hierarchy gave way to Google’s search. Applications have to give away to a ‘just in time’ approach to applications.

    This talk will explain how applications must give way to a more universal approach to application distribution, one based on the mobile web and cloud services. The problem of course, is that the mobile web has both hands tied behind its back. Any mobile app today is locked away behind a browser ghetto: in effect, a sub OS inside a larger mobile OS.

    This isn’t just an arbitrary technology debate, a just-in-time approach to application functionality can unleash entirely new sets of application, ones which are impossible with native apps.

    This talk will layout how this problem can be fixed, and what changes need to take place, outside of just HTML5, for it to happen.

    Scott Jenson, Creative Dir, frog design

    As frog’s Creative Director, Scott Jenson was the first member of the User Interface group at Apple in the late 80s, working on System 7, the Apple Human Interface guidelines and the Newton. After that, he was a freelance design consultant for many years, then director of product design for Symbian, and finally managed the mobile UX group at Google. You can follow frog Creative Director Scott Jenson on Twitter @scottjenson.

    http://schedule.sxsw.com/2012/events/event_IAP12580

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  7. Design for how the world should work

    As the Internet is increasingly embedded into our physical world, it’s important to start designing for physical and intentional interactions with interfaces to supplement the passive, data-gathering interactions — designing smart devices that service us in the background, but upon which we also can exert our will.

    In this episode, Josh Clark (in an interview) and Tim O’Reilly (in a keynote) both address the importance of designing for contextual awareness and physical interaction. Clark stresses that we’re not facing a challenge of technology, but a challenge of imagination. O’Reilly argues that we’re not paying enough attention to the aspects of people and time in designing the Internet of Things, and that the entire system in which we operate is the user interface — as we design this new world, we must think about user needs first.

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  8. Sonic Interaction Design

    Sonic interaction designers create sounds that convey information and feedback to us, such as the distinctive tapping of your touch screen keypad. Karmen Franinovic explains the challenges of this kind of design, and discusses her particular research: sonic interaction design for physical rehabilitation, such as for people re-learning how to walk.

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  9. ModevUX Preview: Josh Clark Goes Deep on Human Interaction Design

    It’s always awesome to get to chat with Josh Clark.  You might know him from his top selling book, Tapworthy, but Josh is also a veteran lecturer and the driving force behind Global Moxie—a creative agency working with some of today’s biggest industry innovators.

    Josh stopped by the Modev podcast for a great chat—that started out about his two upcoming talks happening at ModevUX May 19-20, but quickly turned into a great conversation about the Internet of Things, human interaction design, privacy, and more, including:

    Josh’s work redesigning for media giants like Time, AOL, eBay, Entertainment Weekly, and TechCrunch

    New digital-meets-physical innovations in healthcare, including his recent work with Asthmapolis

    What we mean by passive vs. intentional interaction in design

    How we eventually, more intuitively manipulate smart objects from a distance (HINT: it’s about the object, not simply bolting on technology)

    Who some of the leaders are in the digital-meets-physical revolution

    The ongoing evolution of device-to-device technologies, designing for good, and privacy concerns

    What we mean by ‘software is political.’

    Give it a listen and let us know what you think! You can get us anytime at hello@gomodev.com

    Josh will be leading a 3-hour workshop – Designing for Touch – on May 19 at ModevUX and will be back on May 20 to deliver our closing keynote.

    Join us at the Hilton Tysons Corner in McLean, VA! Save 20% on your registration with code MODEV.

    http://gomodev.com/modevux-preview-josh-clark-human-interaction-design/

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