Allusionist 7: Mountweazel

Possibly related…

  1. Allusionist 4: Detonating the C-Bomb — The Allusionist

    WARNING: this episode is full of FOUL PROFANE LANGUAGE. I suggest you don’t listen to it through loudspeakers at a christening.

    Today I’m trying to figure out why ‘cunt’ is considered to be a ruder swear word than others like ‘twat’ which mean the same thing, or male equivalents like ‘dick’ and ‘knob’. A few hundred years ago, cunt was sufficiently not-rude that there were streets named Gropecunt Lane in most of Britain’s major market towns; yet now, it is top tier of the hierarchy of offensiveness. But maybe in another few hundred years, it will have been supplanted by ‘swear word’ or ‘Jeff’.

    http://www.theallusionist.org/allusionist/c-bomb

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. Allusionist 60: Zillions — The Allusionist

    They look like numbers. They sound like numbers. You kinda know they are

    numbers. But they’re not actually numbers. Linguistic anthropologist

    Stephen Chrisomalis explains what’s going on with indefinite hyperbolic

    numerals like ‘zillion’, ‘squillion’ and ‘kajillion’.

    https://www.theallusionist.org/allusionist/zillions

    —Huffduffed by speedmaster

  3. 16. Little Tiny Words with Dr Lynne Murphy - The OdditoriumThe Odditorium

    Dr Lynne Murphy celebrates those little tiny words that glue our lives together and make our language work. It is about learning to love those words, about treasuring them and keeping them safe. It is about appreciating those little things in life and one little word particular that I haven’t used in this post.

    Any guesses what it might be?

    Lynne Murphy is a Reader in Linguistics at University of Sussex.

    Twitter @lynneguist

    Blog  http://separatedbyacommonlanguage.blogspot.com

    http://oddpodcast.com/portfolio/little-tiny-words/

    —Huffduffed by theantmustdance

  4. 16. Little Tiny Words with Dr Lynne Murphy - The OdditoriumThe Odditorium

    Dr Lynne Murphy celebrates those little tiny words that glue our lives together and make our language work. It is about learning to love those words, about treasuring them and keeping them safe. It is about appreciating those little things in life and one little word particular that I haven’t used in this post.

    Any guesses what it might be?

    Lynne Murphy is a Reader in Linguistics at University of Sussex.

    Twitter @lynneguist

    Blog  http://separatedbyacommonlanguage.blogspot.com

    http://oddpodcast.com/portfolio/little-tiny-words/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. 16. Little Tiny Words with Dr Lynne Murphy - The OdditoriumThe Odditorium

    Dr Lynne Murphy celebrates those little tiny words that glue our lives together and make our language work. It is about learning to love those words, about treasuring them and keeping them safe. It is about appreciating those little things in life and one little word particular that I haven’t used in this post.

    Any guesses what it might be?

    Lynne Murphy is a Reader in Linguistics at University of Sussex.

    Twitter @lynneguist

    Blog  http://separatedbyacommonlanguage.blogspot.com

    http://oddpodcast.com/portfolio/little-tiny-words/

    —Huffduffed by coldbrain

  6. Allusionist 42+43. Survival: The Key rerun — The Allusionist

    To accompany the current Allusionist miniseries Survival, about minority languages facing suppression and extinction, we’re revisiting this double bill of The Key episodes about why languages die and how they can be resuscitated. The Rosetta Stone and its modern equivalent the Rosetta Disk preserve writing systems to be read by future generations. But how do those generations decipher text that wasn’t written with the expectation of requiring decipherment? Features mild scenes of linguistic apocalypse.

    https://www.theallusionist.org/survival-key

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. How Did a Self-Taught Linguist Come to Own an Indigenous Language?

    The Penobscot language was spoken by almost no one when Frank Siebert set about trying to preserve it. The people of Indian Island are still reckoning with his legacy.

    https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2021/04/19/how-did-a-self-taught-linguist-come-to-own-an-indigenous-language

    —Huffduffed by konz