Forecasting the Future of Maps

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  1. On The Map 3: Motoring Maps

    The ultimate in cheap and ubiquitous mapping, there’s scarcely a vehicle in the land that doesn’t contain a dog-eared road atlas. Road maps and their digital descendent, the sat nav, may guide us efficiently around our nation’s highways but they don’t tell us much else about the landscape we’re speeding through. Mike recalls a bygone age of elegant motoring maps and considers how modern road mapping and its unrelenting emphasis on our motorways and trunk roads has changed our picture of Britain.

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. Ten years of Google Maps – Tech Weekly podcast

    On this week’s Tech Weekly podcast, we mark Google Maps’ 10th anniversary – yes, it has been 10 whole years since digital maps hit the mainstream and banished the A to Z from people’s bags.

    Gary Gale from the UK’s Ordnance Survey joins us down the line to talk about the company’s mapping initiatives around digital maps and where maps go next – indoors.

    Plus professor Mark Graham from the Oxford Internet Institute discusses how the geographies of the internet have reconfigured how people engage with the city.

    http://www.theguardian.com/technology/audio/2015/feb/11/tech-weekly-podcast-10-years-of-google-maps

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. Science Fridays: Forecasting the Future of Maps

    Google Maps celebrated its 10-year anniversary this month. In that decade, web and mobile mapping companies have sprung up to chart the corner of every city and integrate real time transportation data into these maps. What will the maps of the future look like, and will they help us move from point A to point B more efficiently?

    http://scifri.me/h84cux

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  4. On The Map 4: Social Mapping

    There’s no more effective way of representing our lives than a map: social and political conditions, health trends and the movements of goods and ideas have far greater impact when they’re plotted in multicoloured cartography. Mike asks how society is now being analysed online in cartographic mash-ups and crowd-sourced data. He also discovers how mapping the human condition, its needs and habits, its highs and its lows, goes back to way before the digital age.

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. On The Map 1: The Map Makers

    Episode one of On The Map from BBC Radio 4.

    Self-confessed map addict Mike Parker explores modern cartography. If a picture paints a thousand words, a map can paint a million. They help us navigate our way through unfamiliar landscapes and cities, entice us into new places and give us a bigger picture of the world we inhabit.

    Mike considers the maps he first fell in love with as a teenager — Ordnance Survey maps.

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. On The Map 10: Maps of the Mind

    The most powerful maps aren’t found on paper or a computer screen. They’re the maps we hold in our memories and imaginations. Mike Parker visits a primary school in his home town to compare the pupils’ maps with his own, drawn from childhood recollection. And he takes a trip to Ambridge, home of the Archers, to meet Eddie Grundy and ask him for directions around the village.

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. On The Map 5: The Lie of the Land

    There are lies, damned lies, statistics - and then there are maps. Borders can be moved and countries expanded, shrunk or even left off the map altogether. We’d like to believe that maps are a purely factual representation of the world with no bias or agenda, but in fact every cartographer decides what to include on their map and what to exclude. Mike Parker discovers how maps can be used as tools of power, politics and propaganda.

    —Huffduffed by adactio