Designing Social Interfaces

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  1. Christian Crumlish, Erin Malone | Stop Putting the Front-end Last

    A lot of R&D still puts the front-end last. But considering the user experience throughout product development pays handsomely, say Christian Crumlish and Erin Malone. One study shows design-led businesses outpacing the FTSE 100 by 100 pct. Crumlish and Malone provide cases for Twitter, Dropbox, Hipmunk, and Etsy, outlining how good UX pays, at the 2011 Web 2.0 Conference.

    UX—User Experience is part user interface engineering, graphic design, usability testing, HCI (human-computer interaction), cognitive psychology, and content strategy. It's best if it's baked in to the mix, rather than added as frosting on the cake.

    So many of the recent offerings that have succeeded in sparking the public's interest and curiosity are especially uncomplicated and easy to use. Both imaginative rethinking and pragmatic testing are required, but the result can be a product that holds up against price wars for the value of the experience.

    Malone presents a case from Twitter, in which they found that new users abandoned their accounts soon after signing on. How could they avoid having new users feel like they had showed up for a party but found, at first, an empty room? The answer was in managing experience flow. Making it easy for users is the clever and quick work of ideation, sketching, rapid iteration, and problem-solving, all design mainstays.

    UX design and testing pays. Good design gets free public relations, as users describe the products as "beautiful" or feel the makers especially understand their needs. Simple A/B testing has netted millions of dollars in profits as one graphic or phrase appeals to consumers over another. Malone urges startups to find UX expert help early, where a few well-chosen design considerations can go a long way.

    Christian Crumlish is a writer, information architect, and digital designer. He is a consumer experience evangelist at AOL, an advisor to and director emeritus of the Information Architecture Institute, and co-chair of the monthly BayCHI program. He was the curator of the Yahoo! Design Pattern Library for several years. He is the author of the bestselling The Internet for Busy People, and The Power of Many, and co-author of Designing Social Interfaces with Erin Malone. He has spoken about social patterns at BarCamp Block, BayCHI, SXSW, the IA Summit, Ignite, Web 2.0 Expo, PLoP, IDEA, Web Directions, the Web App Masters Tour, and WebVisions.

    Erin Malone, Principal with Tangible UX, has led design teams and developing social experiences for web and software for over 20 years. Prior to Tangible UX, she spent 4+ years at Yahoo! leading the Platform User Experience Design team on Community products and platforms, helping develop the Yahoo! Open Strategy, building the Yahoo! Design Pattern Library and providing design expertise to YUI (Yahoo! User Interface Library). She led the redesign of the Yahoo! Developer Network, among other Yahoo initiatives.

    Before Yahoo!, Malone was a Design Director at AOL responsible for community applications, Creative Director at AltaVista and chief Information Architect for Zip2. She was the founding editor-in-chief of Boxes and Arrows and author of several articles on interaction design history and design. She is co-author of the book Designing Social Interfaces with Christian Crumlish for O’Reilly Media.

    http://itc.conversationsnetwork.org/shows/detail4883.html

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. Christian Crumlish – Designing social interfaces

    Web Directions South 2009, Sydney Convention Centre, October 8 2.40pm.

    Designing for social interaction is hard. People are unpredictable, consistency is a mixed blessing, and co-creation with your users requires a dizzying flirtation with loss of control. Christian will present the dos and don’ts of social web design using a sampling of interaction patterns, design principles and best practices to help you improve the design of your digital social environments.

    —Huffduffed by lukebrooker

  3. SpoolCast: Moving Beyond Static Forms with Luke Wroblewski

    Web forms are the mouth that feeds most web apps. There’s no way around that. Yet, few people are thinking about how to make one of the more unpleasant parts of the web more pleasant. The world’s foremost authority on web forms is Luke Wroblewski, author of the heralded book, Web Form Design.

    • Duration: 35m | 16 MB
    • Recorded: January, 2010
    • Brian Christiansen, UIE Podcast Producer

    From http://www.uie.com/brainsparks/2010/02/11/spoolcast-moving-beyond-static-forms-with-luke-wroblewski/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. Web Directions @media: Jeremy Keith — Hot Topics

    Continuing a popular @media tradition, the final session for day one, hosted by Jeremy Keith, will feature a handful of speakers discussing questions posed by conference attendees. Wear your flak jacket: there will be controversy!

    Panelists:

    • John Allsopp
    • Hannah Donovan
    • Simon Willison
    • Christian Crumlish

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. Christian Crumlish: Designing Social Interfaces: 5 Principles, 5 Practices, 5 Anti-Patterns

    As we use social tools on the web, design patterns are emerging. Social design must be organic, not static, emotional, not data-driven. A social experience builds on relationships, not transactions.

    In 2008, Yahoo!'s Christian Crumlish introduced the idea of social design patterns to BayCHI. He returns in 2010 to share what he learned over two years. With his Yahoo! colleague Erin Malone, Christian created a wiki to gather social design patterns and published a snapshot of the wiki in book form.

    Among the many principles of social design, Christian presents five:

    • Pave the Cowpaths: Watch what people do, then support and adapt to that behavior.
    • Talk Like a Person: Use a conversational voice. Be self-deprecating when an error occurs. Ask questions.
    • Be Open: Embrace open standards. Support two-way exchange of data with other applications.
    • Learn from Games: Give your application fun elements, like collecting and customization.
    • Respect the Ethical Dimension: Understand the expectations people have in social situations and abide by them.

    Christian then describes five practices:

    • Give people a way to be identified and to characterize themselves.
    • Create social objects that give people context for interaction.
    • Give people something to do, and understand the continuum of participation, from lurkers to creators to leaders.
    • Enable a bridge to real life.
    • Let the community elevate people and the content they value.

    Finally, he discusses five anti-patterns, commonly-used design choices that appear to solve a problem but that can backfire and pollute of the commons. Examples:

    • The Cargo Cult: Copying successful designs without understanding why they are successful.
    • Breaking Email: Sending an email alert, but rejecting or silently discarding the reply.
    • The Password Anti-Pattern: Asking people for their password to another service encourages poor on-line hygiene.
    • The Ex-Boyfriend Bug: Connecting people who share a social circle but who have reasons to avoid each other.
    • The Potemkin Village: Building groups with no members. Instead, let people gather naturally.

    Christian stresses that social design is an ecosystem in which designers must balance many trade-offs. Not every design pattern applies to every application, but good designers can use patterns to strike a balance that works.

    http://chi.conversationsnetwork.org/shows/detail4459.html

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. Designing for emotion with Aarron Walter | by epicBagel

    In this podcast, we speak with Aarron Walter, user experience design lead at MailChimp, about designing for emotion.

    Aarron talks about why and how MailChimp aimed not just for usable, but for a pleasurable user experience. We also discuss what's fuelled the emergence of emotional design, risks with emotional design and why emotional design should be led by the UX team.

    We also talk about what we can expect from Aarron's exciting new book, 'Designing for Emotion'. You can download an example of the design persona we discuss over at Aarron's blog.

    Guest:
    Aarron Walter, user experience designer (http://aarronwalter.com/)

    Resources:
    Mailchimp (http://www.mailchimp.com/)
    'Designing for Emotion' (http://www.abookapart.com/products/designing-for-emotion)
    Design Persona (http://aarronwalter.com/design-personas/)

    —Huffduffed by theJBJshow

  7. Make It So: Interaction Design Lessons from Science Fiction with Nathan Shedroff & Chris Noessel » UIE Brain Sparks

    Science fiction films often take liberties with the technology that they display. After all, it is fiction. Though they can make up essentially whatever they want, technologies still need to be somewhat realistic to the audience. This influences the way that sci-fi technology is presented in film, but in turn, it’s how sci-fi influences technological advances in the real world.

    Nathan Shedroff, Chair of the MBA in Design Strategy Program at California College of the Arts, and Chris Noessel, Managing Director at Cooper, took it upon themselves to study the lessons that can be learned from science fiction. They analyzed a variety of interfaces from all different time periods of film and television. They discovered that when new technologies are developed and released to the market, people already have expectations of how it should work. This is based upon having already seen a similar, fictional technology.

    Of course, there are instances where the technology in film is all but an impossibility, or at least impractical in real life. This changes as gestural and voice recognition technologies become more advanced, but a lot of interfaces in sci-fi are developed simply for the “cool” factor. Even then, looking to these interfaces as a reference point can help focus a design.

    Nathan and Chris join Jared Spool to discuss their Rosenfeld Media book, Make It So: Interaction Design Lessons from Science Fiction in this podcast.

    https://www.uie.com/brainsparks/2012/10/24/make-it-so-interaction-design-lessons-from-science-fiction-with-nathan-shedroff-chris-noessel/

    —Huffduffed by adactio