Gabriella Coleman on the ethics of free software

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  1. Insight with Gabriella Coleman: Hacker, Hoaxer, Whistleblower, Spy | Frontline Club London

    Anonymous, a group of hackers, activists and technologists, came to the fore in 2008 when they attacked the church of Scientology. Since then their coordinated collective action has come up against global corporations and supported the Arab revolutionaries, but how much do we know about who they are and what motivates them?

    Six years ago Gabriella Coleman, an anthropologist, set out to study the rise of this global phenomenon just as some of its members were turning to political protest and dangerous disruption.Coleman will be joining us in conversation with Ben Hammersley, presenter of the new BBC World News series Cybercrime with Ben Hammersley, to share her story of becoming an Anonymous confidante, interpreter, and erstwhile mouthpiece. She will be talking about the motivations of the group, the meaning of digital activism and the many facets of culture in the Internet age.

    Gabriella Coleman holds the Wolfe Chair in Scientific and Technological Literacy at McGill University. Trained as a cultural anthropologist, she researches, writes about, and teaches on computer hackers and digital activism. She is the author of Coding Freedom: The Ethics and Aesthetics of Hacking and most recently Hacker, Hoaxer, Whistleblower, Spy: The Many Faces of Anonymous.

    http://www.frontlineclub.com/insight-with-gabriella-coleman-hacker-hoaxer-whistleblower-spy/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. A conversation with Bruce Schneier - Software Freedom Law Center

    The Software Freedom Law Center provides legal representation and other law related services to protect and advance Free and Open Source Software.

    https://www.softwarefreedom.org/events/2013/a_conversation_with_bruce_schneier/

    —Huffduffed by mgalloy

  3. A conversation with Bruce Schneier - Software Freedom Law Center

    The Software Freedom Law Center provides legal representation and other law related services to protect and advance Free and Open Source Software.

    http://www.softwarefreedom.org/events/2013/a_conversation_with_bruce_schneier/

    —Huffduffed by albill

  4. The dark side of free software communities — GNU MediaGoblin

    The dark side of free software communities Morgan Gangwere

    When you think of free software, what things come to mind? Freedom, obviously, but what others? A shared community? An open culture? Within free software culture, there is a perception and expectation of openness and collaboration within the community: all are welcome to the table, and your contributions speak for you. When you get outside the community by enough, however, the answer changes. Contemptuous, confusing, elitist, and abrasive are words that some outsiders use to describe free software communities. Some go out of their way to avoid the communities we’ve worked so hard to build. Why?

    In this talk, I’ll look at some of root causes of these opinions and attitudes, as well as how to solve some them and make our communities more approachable by outsiders by using real-world examples of the good, bad, and the ugly. Building off a decade of community involvement on the fringe of free software, plus an academic focus in organizational and community communications, I’ll help us make free software a welcoming place for newcomers, so we can all become strong advocates for free software!

    —Huffduffed by volt4ire

  5. Moves to adopt more Open Source Software | Nine To Noon, 9:38 am on 11 August 2016 | Radio New Zealand

    More software that’s free to use and repurpose should be being produced by government agencies in future thanks to a new document which outlines how agencies can use and license Open Source Software. Nine to Noon speaks to Paul Stone who’s a member of the Open Government Information and Data Programme and Cam Findlay, a technical advisor in open source software development. Find out more at opensourceopensociety.com  

    http://www.radionz.co.nz/national/programmes/ninetonoon/audio/201811732/moves-to-adopt-more-open-source-software

    —Huffduffed by tingbo

  6. Heresies in Free Software - what do the next 20 years look like?

    It’s been 20 years since the Debian Free Software Guidelines were published as part of the Social Contract. In that time, free software has spread further than we could ever have imagined - everything from cars to watches are now dependent upon free software for at least part of their functionality. But in that time we’ve also seen huge shifts in how software is used and how it’s written, with people both becoming more dependent on remote services and on income related to free software development work. People now depend on free software to keep them safe from abusive governments, partners or parents, but have we become any better at designing and writing systems that ensure that their safety is preserved? And even though we’ve pioneered open discussion of diversity issues, why is free software still overwhelmingly produced by white men?

    This talk is intended to challenge the status quo, to encourage us to revisit some of our preconceptions about what’s important about free software and what’s incidental, and to start a discussion on what the next 20 years of free software development and community growth should look like.

    —Huffduffed by volt4ire

  7. CRE026 Free Software Foundation | CRE: Technik, Kultur, Gesellschaft

    Ein Gespräch mit Georg Greve von der FSF-Europe MP3 Audio [26 MB]MPEG-4 AAC Audio [16 MB]Ogg Vorbis Audio [16 MB]Opus Audio [15 MB]DownloadShow URL Links: Linuxtag 2006 Georg Greve Free Software Foundation GNU Project Richard M….Ein Gespräch mit Georg Greve von der FSF-Europe

    Ein Gespräch mit Georg Greve, Präsident der Free Software Foundation Europe, über die Geschichte, Struktur, Arbeit und Ziele der Initiative zur Förderung freier Software.

    Duration: 00:44:36

    Tim Pritlove

    Flattr Tim Pritlove@CRE026 Free Software Foundation

    Georg Greve

    Shownotes:

    Links:

    Linuxtag 2006

    Georg Greve

    Free Software Foundation

    GNU Project

    Richard M. Stallman

    Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

    GNU General Public License

    MIT Artificial Intelligence Laboratory

    Incompatible Timesharing System

    Non-Disclosure-Agreement

    Unix

    Urheberrecht

    Copyright

    FSF Europe

    Boston

    Eric Raymond

    The Cathedral and the Bazaar

    Santa Cruz Operation (SCO)

    Xenix

    Microsoft

    IBM

    SCO verklagt IBM wegen Linux

    Open Source Initiative

    Silicon Valley

    Bruce Perens

    The Debian Free Software Guidelines (DFSG)

    Debian

    BSD-Lizenz

    Ogg Vorbis

    Copyleft

    Wikipedia

    GNU-Lizenz für freie Dokumentation (GFDL)

    Fair Use

    Creative Commons

    Lawrence Lessig

    Lawrence Lessig will die Kultur von ihren Copyright-Fesseln befreien

    Open Media Commons

    Snake Oil

    Cory Doctorow

    CRE017 GNU General Public License

    Tivo

    EU Copyright Directive (EUCD)

    Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA)

    World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO)

    World Trade Organization (WTO)

    Übereinkommen über handelsbezogene Aspekte der Rechte des geistigen Eigentums (Trips)

    FSF Indien

    Free Software Foundation Latin America

    Fellowship of Free Software Foundation Europe

    Ciarán O’Riordan

    FSF Europe: GPLv3

    FSF Europe: Veranstaltungen

    http://cre.fm/cre026-free-software-foundation

    —Huffduffed by Netzzwerk

  8. Open Source Culture is Very US-Centric, But It Shouldn’t Be How Can We Make FOSS Truly Global?

    Free and open source software is made up of a truly global community of tinkerers, collaborators and innovators. In this conversation, Deb Nicholson and Hong Phuc Dang will look at the global state of open source policy and talk about why no particular country — especially the US — should be centered. So, let’s make sure the conversation about the future of open source is a truly global one!

    Sure, lots of tech came from the US; Microsoft, Apple, Google, Facebook, Amazon but a large proportion of the story of free and open source software didn’t happen in the US. In fact, most of the exciting parts of the work to encourage people to adopt, build and adapt open source are happening in other places. In this conversation, Deb Nicholson and Hong Phuc Dang will look at the global state of open source policy and talk about why no particular country — especially the US — should be centered. They’ll cover:

    • Public code strategies and adoption of open source tools in different jurisdictions
    • Policy initiatives that foster free and open source software production
    • Local FOSS adoption blueprints that could be replicated around the world Open source is a global community of tinkerers, collaborators and innovators. It’s time to share the spotlight more equitably. Solutions for small cities, or minority language groups or vulnerable populations could come from anywhere and be applied around the world. The discussions around public code and adoption aren’t even happening in the US yet, and code without hearty adoption isn’t enough. So, let’s make sure the conversation about the future of open source is a truly global one!

    —Huffduffed by volt4ire