adactio / Jeremy Keith

An Irish web developer living in Brighton, England working with Clearleft.

I built Huffduffer.

There are thirty-seven people in adactio’s collective.

Huffduffed (3367)

  1. The Web Platform Podcast : 111 Extensible Web Components

    A weekly show that dives deep into all things web from the developers building the platform today.

    Jeremy Keith (@adactio), web guru & co-founder of ClearLeft, talks with us about the potential pitfalls and hopes on Progressive Enhancement with Web Components.

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. Margaret Atwood Takes a Phone Call From Paul

    Margaret Atwood talks to Paul Holdengraber and it is wonderful.

    Original video:
    Downloaded by on Fri, 21 Oct 2016 09:31:23 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. Song Exploder | MGMT

    Ben Goldwasser and Andrew VanWyngarden break down the MGMT song "Time to Pretend."

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. David Eagleman: The Brain and The Now - The Long Now

    02016 marks The Long Now Foundation’s 20th year and we are holding our first ever Long Now Member Summit to showcase and connect with our amazing community on Tuesday October 4, 02016 from noon to 11:30pm, at Fort Mason Center in San Francisco.

    David Eagleman will be giving the keynote talk on "The Brain and The Now" and will be joined onstage after his talk by Stewart Brand and Danny Hillis for further discussion and Q&A.

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. Self Developer - Developer Sara Soueidan — Being Freelance PODCAST WITH Steve Folland

    How do you go from having no idea of a career… to becoming Net Awards Developer of the Year? In just a couple of years?!

    For Lebanese freelancer Sara it’s been a journey of self development as much as anything she’s done for the web. Hear her story of learning, sharing, writing, speaking, teaching, creating… and then learning some more.

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. #79 Boy in Photo

    Who was Wayne?

    Original video:
    Downloaded by on Sat, 15 Oct 2016 22:24:32 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. How the Irish created the great wines of Bordeaux (and elsewhere)

    I confess, quaffing a Lynch-Bages or a snifter of Hennessy, I have wondered how it is that such fine upstanding Irish names come to be associated with cognac and claret. There my wonderings ended, until a recent visit to Ireland, where, in Cork and Kinsale, I found answers. Starting in the 17th century an intrepid band of Irish emigrants set out first for France, then the rest of Europe, and ultimately almost anywhere wines are made. And almost everywhere they went, the Irish diaspora had an impact on wine-making that belies the idea that the Irish know only about beers.

    The story is a complex one, built on tarriff wars, free trade and political union, with a touch of religious persecution thrown in for good measure.

    Sound familiar?

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  8. A brief history of Irish butter

    Podcast: Play in new window | Download The Butter Museum in Cork, Ireland, features on some lists of the world’s quirky etc. food museums but not others. It ought to be on all of them. This is a seriously interesting museum for anyone who likes butter, and in my book, that means just about everyone. (I refuse absolutely to say anything about the impact – if any – of butter on health, not least because there’s nothing certain one can say.) It sits next to the grand Butter Exchange, built when the Cork Butter Market sat like a colossus astride the global market. The Irish butter traded through Cork was done in by refrigeration, fell to the lowest level possible, and then emerged again after Ireland joined the European Union, by returning to the principles that made the Cork Butter Exchange great. The Butter Museum tells the whole story. This episode tells a bit of it.

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  9. When is a zucchini not a zucchini?

    People accused me of being a tease when I originally published that banner photograph up there and said that it was not a zucchini. It was, I admit, a deliberate provocation. It all depends on whether we’re speaking English or Italian. Because in English it isn’t, strictly speaking, a zucchini. It is a cocozelle, a type of summer squash that differs from a zucchini in a couple of important ways, one being that it hangs onto its flower a lot longer. So a flower on a cocozelle is not the guarantee of freshness that it is on a true zucchini. In Italian, however, it is a zucchini. Or rather, a zucchina. Because in modern Italian, all summer squashes are zucchine.

    Teresa Lust is a linguist and food writer. Harry Paris is a plant breeder who specialises in pumpkins, melons and the like. Together, they have just published a paper that pushes back the known history of the zucchini. They guided me through the somewhat convoluted history of true pumpkins in Italy.

    It’s a story of exploration, aristocracy and promiscuity. What more could you want?

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  10. Secret Histories of Podcasting | Benjamen Walker’s Theory of Everything

    It turns out there are (at least) three ways to tell the secret history of podcasting: it is a story about technology, it is a story about a business model for audio, and it is also a story about the birth of a new art form. What’s really cool is that the whole thing is sort of a Rashomon narrative – in this special edition to mark the radiotopiaforever campaign your host attempts to tell all three versions using the same people.

    —Huffduffed by adactio

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