adactio / Jeremy Keith

An Irish web developer living in Brighton, England working with Clearleft.

I built Huffduffer.

There are thirty-eight people in adactio’s collective.

Huffduffed (3799)

  1. Steven Pinker: A New Enlightenment - The Long Now

    The Enlightenment worked, says Steven Pinker. By promoting reason, science, humanism, progress, and peace, the programs set in motion by the 18th-Century intellectual movement became so successful we’ve lost track of what that success came from.

    Some even discount the success itself, preferring to ignore or deny how much better off humanity keeps becoming, decade after decade, in terms of health, food, money, safety, education, justice, and opportunity. The temptation is to focus on the daily news, which is often dire, and let it obscure the long term news, which is shockingly good.

    This is the 21st Century, not the 18th, with different problems and different tools. What are Enlightenment values and programs for now?

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. Disrupting Dystopia - The Bruce Sterling Talk - SXSW 2018

    Original video:
    Downloaded by on Fri, 16 Mar 2018 21:13:33 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. Building And Dwelling

    Richard Sennett, one of the world’s leading thinkers on the urban environment, traces the relationship between how cities are built and how people live in them.

    In describing how cities such as Paris, Barcelona and New York assumed their modern forms, Sennett explores the intimate relationship between the good built environment and the good life.

    This event was recorded live at The RSA on Thursday 15th March 2018. Discover more about this event here:

    Original video:
    Downloaded by on Tue, 20 Mar 2018 12:12:12 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. An IndieWeb Podcast: Episode 0 “Considering the User”

    This is a test or alpha episode of An Indieweb Podcast (working title). In it, David Shanske and and I talk about a variety of Indieweb topics, with the theme of "Considering the User", inspired by an article we were reading this week.


    Tagged with indieweb

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. Why Paper Jams Persist | The New Yorker

    Joshua Rothman writes about how a trivial problem reveals the limits of technology.

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. BBC Radio 4 - The Life Scientific, Stephanie Shirley on computer coding

    As a young woman, Stephanie Shirley worked at the Dollis Hill Research Station building computers from scratch: but she told young admirers that she worked for the Post Office, hoping they would think she sold stamps. In the early 60s she changed her name to Steve and started selling computer programmes to companies who had no idea what they were or what they could do, employing only mothers who worked from home writing code by hand with pen and pencil and then posted it to her. By the mid-80s her software company employed eight thousand people, still mainly women with children. She made an absolute fortune but these days Stephanie thinks less about making money and much more about how best to give it away.

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. Algorisky

    From Google search to Facebook news, algorithms shape our online experience. But like us, algorithms are flawed. Programmers write cultural biases into code, whether they realize it or not. Author Luke Dormehl explores the impact of algorithms, on and offline. Staci Burns and James Bridle investigate the human cost when YouTube recommendations are abused. Anthropologist Nick Seaver talks about the danger of automating the status quo. Safiya Noble looks at preventing racial bias from seeping into code. And Allegheny County’s Department of Children and Family Services shows us how a well-built algorithm can help save lives.

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  8. 301: Hangovers - ShopTalk

    We’ve recovered from our ep300 festivities and we’re back answering your Q’s with our best A’s - How to handle multiple projects on a dev team? What should we call JavaScript? Tips for scroll-jacking in a nice way? Best practices for CSS? And how to write when you don’t want to write?

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  9. How does the internet work? Julia Evans on CodeNewbie

    You type in a url and you get a website. But how did you get that website? What are all the little steps that happen when you request a page and (hopefully) see that page in your browser? Julia Evans breaks down how the internet works and gives us an amazing introduction to computer networking.

    Julia is a software developer who lives in Montreal. She works on infrastructure at Stripe, gives talks and has published a collection of awesome free programming zines.

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  10. Claire L. Evans, Author of Broad Band- The Untold Story of the Women Who Made the Internet | Internet History Podcast

    Claire Evans is the author of the new book: Broad Band The Untold Story of the Women Who Made the Internet. This is the best tech history book I’ve read in a while and you know I read them all. Of special note, considering our 90s-heavy focus on this podcast, the book includes the stories of, which was a competitor to (which we’ve previously covered) and which was a competitor to Ivillage (which, again, we’ve spoke at length about). But you also get an amazing portair of tech in the 1970s, hypertext as a movement outside of the web, and stories about amazing women like Grace Hopper and Jake Feinler.

    —Huffduffed by adactio

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