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adactio / Jeremy Keith

An Irish web developer living in Brighton, England working with Clearleft.

I built Huffduffer.

There are thirty-eight people in adactio’s collective.

Huffduffed (3822)

  1. Episode 126: How Ann Boleyn gave us our right to privacy • DecodeDC

    What do Ann Boleyn and Henry VIII have to do with Roe v Wade and a right to privacy?

    http://www.decodedc.com/126/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. BBC Radio 4 - In Our Time, The Physics of Reality

    Melvyn Bragg examines the attempt to reconcile Quantum Theory and classical physics.

    Melvyn Bragg examines the physics of reality. When Quantum Mechanics was developed in the early 20th century reality changed forever. In the quantum world particles could be in two places at once, they disappeared for no reason and reappeared in unpredictable locations, they even acted differently according to whether we were watching them. It was so shocking that Erwin Schrodinger, one of the founders of Quantum Theory, said "I don’t like it and I’m sorry I ever had anything to do with it." He even developed an experiment with a cat to show how absurd it was. Quantum Theory was absurd, it disagreed with the classical physics of Newton and Einstein and it clashed with our experience of the everyday world. Footballs do not disappear without reason, cats do not split into two and shoes do not act differently when we are not looking at them. Or do they? Eighty years later we are still debating whether the absurd might actually be true. But why are features of quantum physics not seen in our experience of everyday reality? Can the classical and quantum worlds be reconciled, and why should reality make sense to us? With Roger Penrose, Emeritus Rouse Ball Professor of Mathematics, Oxford University; Fay Dowker, Lecturer in Theoretical Physics, Queen Mary, University of London; Tony Sudbery, Professor of Mathematics, University of York.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p00548dl

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. John McWhorter on the Evolution of Language and Words on the Move | EconTalk | Library of Economics and Liberty

    How did bad come to mean good? Why is Shakespeare so hard to understand? Is there anything good about "like" and "you know?" Author and professor John McWhorter of Columbia University talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the unplanned ways that English speakers create English, an example of emergent order. Topics discussed include how words get short (but not too short), the demand for vividness in language, and why Shakespeare is so hard to understand.

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. Claire Evans – Mother Internet

    Technology writer Claire Evans talks about her new book “Broad Band: The Untold Story of Women Who Made the Internet.”

    ===
    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PEHlRqdohY8
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Tue, 17 Apr 2018 19:04:07 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. Track Changes: Who Really Made The Internet?: Claire L. Evans on Tech History

    How did cyberpunks and activists affect the tech industry? Do we understand the history of the internet? How much of what we know comes only from a man’s perspective? This week, Claire L. Evans tells us about her new book, Broad Band, and the women who created the internet.

    There Were Women In The Room: This week Paul Ford and Gina Trapani sit down with Claire L. Evans to chat about her new book,

    Broad Band: The Untold Story of the Women Who Made the Internet. We discuss the impact of online communities, how weird the dot-com era was, and the stories of the women who made things work. We also get a window into Y△CHT’s future project — the Broad Band Musical!

    2:29 — Claire: “[This book is] a corrective if you will, of all the books we’ve all read and love about Silicon Valley, and the garage-to-riches stories of entrepreneurship… These are the stories about the women who were in the room the whole time, and nobody asked about them.”

    5:06 — Paul: “Women get forgotten from activist histories too, and it was kind of an activist scene in the early days.”

    5:22 — Gina: “Weird was welcome, in a way that is no longer the case.”

    7:03 — Claire: “My big takeaway is how little we value long-term care and maintenance when it comes to building things… I profile Stacy Horn, who founded Echo BBS in the late 90s. It still exists. And she has devoted 25 years of her life to fostering and caring for this community. … She’s taking care of something, because she’s responsible for a community, and I think that’s really beautiful.”

    8:24— Claire: “We mythologize the box, but it’s the users that change the world; it’s what you do with it. The culture work, the development of making things worth linking is almost as important as making the conventions for linking.

    8:24 — Gina: “It’s broadening the definition of what making the web was. It wasn’t just about standardizing protocols and running code, it was about building the places where people wanted to come and connect and share.”

    9:07— Paul: “Moderation…it’s critical, it’s key to these communities but it doesn’t get as much appreciation as ‘I wrote a page of code.’”

    20:51 — Claire: “We’re all very siloed in the contemporary media landscape.”

    http://trackchanges.libsyn.com/who-really-made-the-internet-claire-l-evans-on-techhistory

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. A visit to Hummustown

    Eating is a political act, as Wendell Berry reminded us. Which is why I was very happy to sample the food on offer by Syrian refugees in Hummustown.

    Refugees selling the food of their homeland to get a start in a new life is, by now, a cliché. Khaled (in the photo) joined their ranks a year ago. But cliché or not, selling food is an important way to give people work to do, wages, and hope. If it’s happening on your doorstep, which it is, and the food is good, which it is, what’s a hungry podcaster to do? Go there, obviously, and report back. Which is why, a couple of weeks ago, I found myself, microphone in hand, waiting patiently in line for a falafel wrap.

    Truth be told, there aren’t that many Syrian refugees in Italy. The most recent official statistics put the total at around 5000 with a little over 600 in Rome. Hummustown is helping a few of them.

    https://www.eatthispodcast.com/a-visit-to-hummustown/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. Homaro Cantu, the genius chef who wanted to change the world – podcast | News | The Guardian

    How a homeless child grew up to become the most inventive chef in history.

    https://www.theguardian.com/news/audio/2018/apr/16/the-life-and-death-of-homaro-cantu-the-genius-chef-who-wanted-to-change-the-world-podcast

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  8. Can science fiction predict our economic future?

    Companies take a deep dive into the stacks of a sci-fi library to find out how we might react to new tech.

    https://www.marketplace.org/2018/04/12/business/can-science-fiction-predict-future

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  9. Presentable #43: Google AMP vs the Web - Relay FM

    Special guest Andrew Betts of the W3C Technical Advisory Group joins the show to discuss Google AMP: how it works, whether we should use it, and if it’s a threat to the open web and to society overall?

    https://www.relay.fm/presentable/43

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  10. New Space | Dell Technologies United States

    Prepare for liftoff. In this episode we go deep into space: into the known unknowns we’ve explored, and the unknown unknowns that lie ahead.

    https://www.delltechnologies.com/en-us/perspectives/podcasts/trailblazers/s02-e04-new-space.htm#autoplay=false&autoexpand=true&episode=203&transcript=false

    —Huffduffed by adactio

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