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adactio / Jeremy Keith

An Irish web developer living in Brighton, England working with Clearleft.

I built Huffduffer.

There are thirty-seven people in adactio’s collective.

Huffduffed (3293)

  1. BBC World Service - Discovery, “Faster, Better, Cheaper”

    Kevin Fong explores the success and failure of NASA’s missions to Mars

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p041b4k4

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. RWD Podcast #51 — Responsive Web Design

    I talk about using a combination of your own CMS, RSS feed and something like IFTTT to post it for you. I use IFTTT for posting articles to Surf the Dream, saving images from Facebook, posting news articles to Facebook… although now I’m trialling Zapier.Speaking of Wordpress, I also delve into some issues that I recently came across with a clients site.changing URLs - why that can be badLinks don’t workno natively support 301 redirectsPage templates failing

    https://responsivedesign.is/podcasts/rwd-podcast-51

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. BBC World Service - Discovery, The Alien Equation

    50th anniversary of the equation that launched the search for ET.

    Kevin Fong celebrates the anniversary of one of the most iconic equations ever written. The Drake Equation was created by Frank Drake some half a century ago in a bid to answer one of the most profound questions facing science and humanity: are we alone? Its creation launched a 50 year, genuine scientific endeavour to search for ET, known as SETI: The Search for Extra Terrestrial Intelligence. Kevin visits the SETI Institute in Northern California, to meet the great man himself, Frank Drake, and some of his scientific colleagues who have spent most of their working lives hunting for signs of alien life, out there in the cosmic ether.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p009rtr0

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. BBC World Service - Discovery, The Feynman Variations

    Brian Cox presents a tribute to Richard Feynman.

    Widely regarded as the finest physicist of his generation and the most influential since Einstein, Feynman did much to popularise science, through lectures, books and television, not least his revelation at a press conference in which he demonstrated the exact cause of the Challenger Shuttle explosion in 1986.

    Described as the ‘Mozart of physics’, Feynman’s amazing life and career seemingly had no end of highlights.

    A student at MIT and then Princeton (where he obtained an unprecedented perfect score on the entrance exam for maths and physics), he was drafted onto the Manhattan Project as a junior scientist.

    There his energy and talents made a significant mark on two of the project’s leaders, Robert Oppenheimer and Hans Bethe.

    The latter would become Feynman’s lifelong mentor and friend.

    Bethe called his student "a magician", setting him apart from other scientists as ‘no ordinary genius’.

    In 1965, Feynman shared a Nobel Prize for his unique contribution to the field of Quantum Electrodynamics making him the most celebrated, influential and best known American Physicist of his generation

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p00b6djp

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. Is the Internet Being Ruined? - Freakonomics Radio - WNYC

    It’s a remarkable ecosystem that allows each of us to exercise control over our lives. But how much control do we truly have? How many of our decisions are really being made by Google and Facebook and Apple? And, perhaps most importantly: is the Internet’s true potential being squandered?

    http://www.wnyc.org/story/internet-being-ruined/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. Non Breaking Space Show #86: Dave Olsen — Pattern Lab 2 - Goodstuff FM

    In this show, Christopher Schmitt talks with Dave Olsen, programmer/ project manager with West Virginia University, about the recent release of Pattern Lab 2. Pattern Lab helps teams build thoughtful, pattern-driven UIs using atomic design principles.

    http://goodstuff.fm/nbsp/86

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. BBC Radio 4 - Computing Britain, Connected Thinking

    Long before the heroics of the world wide web, the internet was born out of a mixture of American ambition and British thrift. Packet Switching was the name coined by Welsh computer scientist Donald Davies in an effort to link the early computers in the labs of the National Physical Laboratory in Teddington.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b069xdy3

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  8. BBC Radio 4 - Computing Britain, ERNIE Picks Prizes

    In 1956, adverts enticed the British public with a brand new opportunity. Buy premium bonds for one pound, for the chance to win a thousand. At the time, it was a fortune - half the price of the average house.

    Behind this tantalising dream was a machine called ERNIE - the Electronic Random Number Indicator Equipment.

    ERNIE was built by the team who constructed Colossus, the code-breaking engine housed at Bletchley Park. They had just nine months to make a machine that generated random numbers using all the latest kit, from printed circuit boards to metal transistors.

    In this episode, mathematician Hannah Fry talks to Dr Tilly Blyth from the Science Museum about how ERNIE became an unlikely celebrity. Featuring archive from NS&I, the Science Museum and the BBC Library.

    Presented by Hannah Fry

    Produced by Michelle Martin

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b069wzvw

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  9. BBC Radio 4 - Computing Britain, LEO the Electronic Office

    Hannah Fry hears the incredible story of how a chain of British teashops produced the first office computer in the world.

    J Lyons and Company was the UK’s largest catering company, with 250 teashops across the country. They also owned their own bakeries, a tea plantation and haulage firm, as Dr Tilly Blyth from the Science Museum describes.

    By the 1950s, this vast business was drowning in paperwork. Lyons embarked on an ambitious new project to build a machine called LEO - the Lyons Electronic Office.

    Their office computer was based on the giant calculating machines being built inside UK universities to solve mathematical equations

    Sure, these machines could manage maths, but could they handle catering?

    Featuring archive from the British Library, the Science Museum and the LEO Society.

    Presented by Hannah Fry

    Produced by Michelle Martin

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b069rvb4

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  10. BBC Radio 4 - Computing Britain, Electronic Brains

    From the mobile phone to the office computer, mathematician Hannah Fry looks back at 70 years of computing history, to reveal the UK’s lead role in developing the technology we use today.

    In the first episode, she travels back to the 1940s, to hear the incredible story of the creation, in Britain, of the computer memory.

    Three teams from across the country - in Teddington, Manchester and Cambridge - were tasked with designing automatic calculating engines for university research. But which team would be first to crack the tricky problem of machine memory?

    Meanwhile, tabloid headlines proclaimed that engineers were building ‘electronic brains’ that could match, and maybe surpass, the human brain, starting a debate about automation and artificial intelligence that still resonates today.

    Featuring archive from the Science Museum and the BBC Library, plus an interview with technology historian Dr James Sumner from Manchester University.

    Presented by Hannah Fry

    Produced by Michelle Martin

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b069r3rt

    —Huffduffed by adactio

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