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adactio / Jeremy Keith

An Irish web developer living in Brighton, England working with Clearleft.

I built Huffduffer.

There are thirty-eight people in adactio’s collective.

Huffduffed (3534)

  1. #71 — What Is Technology Doing to Us?

    In this episode of the Waking Up podcast, Sam Harris speaks with Tristan Harris about the arms race for human attention, the ethics of persuasion, the consequences of having an ad-based economy, the dynamics of regret, and other topics. You can support the Waking Up podcast at samharris.org/support.

    http://wakingup.libsyn.com/71-what-is-technology-doing-to-us

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. Alien 3 - When Studios Interfere

    Enjoy this in-depth discussion on the extensive pre-production of Alien 3, failed drafts, recycled ideas and the eventual theatrical cut. We also discuss the differences between the theatrical cut and the assembly cut, and which is better.

    Chris Stuckmann and Matthew Brando review Alien 3, starring Sigourney Weaver, Charles S. Dutton, Charles Dance, Lance Henriksen. Directed by David Fincher.

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    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q_r6AWJRV38
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Mon, 17 Apr 2017 17:36:26 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. EP.38 - Brian Eno, Part Two

    The second of two rambly conversations with artist, musician, producer and polymath, Brian Eno.

    https://www.acast.com/adambuxton/ep.38-brianenoparttwo

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. EP.37 - Brian Eno, Part One

    The first of two rambly conversations with artist, musician, producer and polymath, Brian Eno.

    https://www.acast.com/adambuxton/ep.37-brianenopartone

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. Star Wars: The Last Jedi Panel | Star Wars Celebration Orlando 2017 (US)

    Watch the complete Star Wars: The Last Jedi panel at Star Wars Celebration Orlando 2017, featuring Rian Johnson, Kathleen Kennedy, and much more!

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    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mh4X4N-8fEM
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Sat, 15 Apr 2017 17:36:06 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. How Aristotle Created the Computer - The Atlantic - Chris Dixon

    The philosophers he influenced set the stage for the technological revolution that remade our world.

    Read the full text version here: https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2017/03/aristotle-computer/518697/

    The history of computers is often told as a history of objects, from the abacus to the Babbage engine up through the code-breaking machines of World War II. In fact, it is better understood as a history of ideas, mainly ideas that emerged from mathematical logic, an obscure and cult-like discipline that first developed in the 19th century. Mathematical logic was pioneered by philosopher-mathematicians, most notably George Boole and Gottlob Frege, who were themselves inspired by Leibniz’s dream of a universal “concept language,” and the ancient logical system of Aristotle.

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    Original video: https://soundcloud.com/user-154380542/how-aristotle-created-the-computer-the-atlantic-chris-dixon
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Mon, 27 Mar 2017 22:21:33 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. The Clock

    The clock was invented in 1656 and has become an essential part of the modern economy.

    There’s no such thing as “the correct time”. Like the value of money, it’s a convention that derives its usefulness from the widespread acceptance of others. But there is such a thing as accurate timekeeping. That dates from 1656, and a Dutchman named Christiaan Huygens. In the centuries since, as Tim Harford explains, the clock has become utterly essential to almost every area of the modern economy.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p04skkw4

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  8. Public key cryptography

    Geeks versus government – the story of public key cryptography.

    Take a very large prime number – one that is not divisible by anything other than itself. Then take another. Multiply them together. That is simple enough, and it gives you a very, very large “semi-prime” number. That is a number that is divisible only by two prime numbers. Now challenge someone else to take that semi-prime number, and figure out which two prime numbers were multiplied together to produce it. That, it turns out, is exceptionally hard. Some mathematics are a lot easier to perform in one direction than another. Public key cryptography works by exploiting this difference. And without it we would not have the internet as we know it. Tim Harford tells the story of public key cryptography – and the battle between the geeks who developed it, and the government which tried to control it.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p04vqrwy

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  9. Free Thinking Festival: Time, Space and Science

    Carlos Frenk, Eugenia Cheng, Jim Al-Khalili and Louisa Preston debate time and space.

    Carlos Frenk, Eugenia Cheng, Jim Al-Khalili and Louisa Preston debate time and space with presenter Rana Mitter and an audience at Radio 3’s Free Thinking Festival at Sage Gateshead.

    We can measure time passing but what actually is it? What do scientists mean when they suggest that time is an illusion. Can time exist in a black hole? Is everyone’s experience of time subjective? What is the connection between time and space? How does maths help us understand the universe?

    Professor Carlos Frenk is founding Director of the Institute for Computational Cosmology at Durham University and the winner of the Gold Medal of the Royal Astronomical Society in 2014.

    Dr Eugenia Cheng is Scientist in Residence at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and an Honorary Fellow of the University of Sheffield. She is trilingual, a concert-level classical pianist and the author of Beyond Infinity: An Expedition To The Outer Limits Of The Mathematical Universe.

    Jim Al-Khalili is Professor of Physics at the University of Surrey and presenter of BBC Radio 4’s The Life Scientific and TV documentaries. His books include Paradox: the Nine Greatest Enigmas in Science, Black Holes, Wormholes and Time Machines and Quantum: a Guide for the Perplexed.

    Dr Louisa Preston is a UK Space Agency Aurora Research Fellow. An astrobiologist, planetary geologist and author, she is based at Birkbeck, University of London. Her first book is Goldilocks and the Water Bears: the Search for Life in the Universe.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p04z7ws1

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  10. Radioactive Art

    Radioactive waste can remain dangerous to humans for 100,000 years. Nations with nuclear power are building underground storage facilities to permanently house it, but how might they mark these sites for future generations? The nuclear industry is turning to artists for creative solutions. How might artists create a warning that will still be understood and heeded so far into the future? Radioactive Art meets artists whose work deals with issues around nuclear legacy, and visits the nuclear agency in France that has sought their input.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p04vg4f2

    —Huffduffed by adactio

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