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adactio / Jeremy Keith

An Irish web developer living in Brighton, England working with Clearleft.

I built Huffduffer.

There are thirty-eight people in adactio’s collective.

Huffduffed (3559)

  1. Progressive web apps and the Windows ecosystem | Build 2017 | Channel 9

    Whether at home or at work, the web plays an increasingly critical role in our daily lives. As we have become more dependent on accessing the tools it powers, we’ve also struggled to overcome some of its limitations—network connectivity, for instance. At Microsoft, we’ve long been interested in the power of the web for software development and we are even more excited for the future possibilities offered by progressive web apps (PWAs). In this session, we discuss what PWAs are, how they can be integrated into the development process of modern websites, the advantages and disadvantages of PWAs vs. native development, and what opportunities they present when installed alongside native apps in Windows.

    https://channel9.msdn.com/Events/Build/2017/B8075

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. 50 Things That Made the Modern Economy: Passports

    How much might global economic output rise if anyone could work anywhere? Some economists have calculated it would double. By the turn of the 20th century only a handful of countries were still insisting on passports to enter or leave. Today, migrant controls are back in fashion. It can seem like a natural fact of life that the name of the country on our passport determines where you can travel and work – legally, at least.

    But it’s a relatively recent historical development – and, from a certain angle, an odd one. Many countries take pride in banning employers from discriminating against characteristics we can’t change: whether we’re male or female, young or old, gay or straight, black or white.

    It’s not entirely true that we can’t change our passport: if you’ve got $250,000, for example, you can buy one from St Kitts and Nevis. But mostly our passport depends on the identity of our parents and location of our birth. And nobody chooses those.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p052spyb

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. The Digital Human: Haunted

    Aleks Krotoski asks if we are haunted by our technology, or are we haunting it?

    So much of our experience of technology can feel a bit like being haunted. It starts like any good ghost story with the just mildly unsettling; things aren’t were you left them or seem to have moved on their own within our devices. Its a creepy feeling that leaves you unsure about what to believe. Our understanding of how much of technology works is so limited that when it starts to behave out of the ordinary we have no explanation. This is when we start to make very peculiar judgement’s; "why did you do that" we plead, as if some hidden force was at work.

    For some these feelings of being haunted by our technology can develop into full blown apparitions; keen gamers frequently experience Game transfer Phenomena where they literally see images of their game play in the real world, an involuntary augmented reality. While the hallucinations aren’t necessarily distressing in themselves the experiences can leave individuals questioning their sanity.

    The coming internet of things will bring problems of its own; smart locks that mysteriously open by themselves for example as if under the influence of some poltergeist. Aleks herself has had the experience of digital ‘gas lighting’ (a term drawn from an Ingrid Bergman movie of a woman being driven mad by husband) when her partner logged on to their home automation system remotely and started to mess with the lights while Aleks was home alone. As one commentator puts it in a reworking of the old Arthur C. Clarke quote "any sufficiently advanced hacking is indistinguishable from haunting."

    And as our devices and appliances increasingly start talking to each other bypassing us altogether who’s to say we, like Nicole Kidman’s character in The Others, haven’t become the ghost in the machine.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b080t0p9

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. Neal Stephenson at The Interval at Long Now | San Francisco

    "SEVENEVES at The Interval reading and signing": A special daytime talk by celebrated speculative fiction author
 Neal Stephenson on the occassion of his just released novel "SEVENEVES". After a reading, Long Now co-founder Stewart Brand joins Neal to discuss the research and writing of the new book, plus a little bit about what is coming next.

    https://theinterval.org/salon-talks/02015/may/21/seveneves-interval-reading-and-signing

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. Jason Scott at The Interval at Long Now | San Francisco

    "The Web In An Eye Blink": A filmmaker, historian, and self-proclaimed rogue archivist, Jason Scott discusses his personal history of preserving the digital commons which began with rescuing his favorite BBS-era "text files" and continued with saving gigabytes of the first user-created homepages (i.e. GeoCities.com) which were about to be trashed by their corporate owner. Today his mission, in his role at the Internet Archive, is to save all the computer games and make them playable again inside modern web browsers. And that’s where things get really weird.

    https://theinterval.org/salon-talks/02015/feb/24/web-eye-blink

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. The Field Study Handbook with Jan Chipchase

    Researcher and author Jan Chipchase has a new book — "The Field Study Handbook." We discuss how he came to produce this 500+ page magnum opus — a distillation of his life’s work — and why he is self publishing.

    https://craigmod.com/onmargins/001/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. The State of Progressive Web Apps | Build 2017 | Channel 9

    We discussed what Progressive Web Apps (PWAs) are and their benefits as they allow developers to create web apps that progressively light up features on modern mobile browsers to offer many features t

    https://channel9.msdn.com/Events/Build/2017/C9R04

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  8. Episode 12: Flipper

    This week’s episode of the Awlcast is a special edition, written and recorded by David Obuchowksi, the author of "Dial D for Dolphin," a story about the mystery behind a spam caller he dialed back.

    His story is about phone calls, but it’s also about stories, mysteries, and what we want to believe about both.

    https://theawl.com/dial-d-for-dolphin-7c1d7a3293b4

    ===
    Original video: https://soundcloud.com/the_awl/episode-12-flipper
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Fri, 12 May 2017 08:59:41 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  9. Kevin Kelly on the Future of the Web and Everything Else | EconTalk | Library of Economics and Liberty

    Author Kevin Kelly talks about the role of technology in our lives, the future of the web, how to time travel, the wisdom of the hive, the economics of reputation, the convergence of the biological and the mechanical, and his impact on the movies The Matrix and Minority Report.

    http://www.econtalk.org/archives/2007/03/kevin_kelly_on.html

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  10. 262: CSS Grid with Rachel Andrew and Jen Simmons - ShopTalk

    Grid is getting a ton of support in modern browsers and so we’ve got a couple of grid experts in Jen Simmons and Rachel Andrew on to help us navigate the grid – what is it? When can we use it? How do flexbox and grid play together? What about Bootstrap?

    Questions

    7:00 What is grid? And what does it mean?

    16:30 What’s the mobile story for grid?

    22:30 What is grid and why should someone be excited about it?

    27:40 What about all that extra CSS with grid?

    36:10 What’s autofill?

    47:40 How do flexbox and grid play together?

    1:01:02 When should you use something like Bootstrap?

    http://shoptalkshow.com/episodes/262-css-grid-rachel-andrew-jen-simmons/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

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