Stuff You Should Know

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  1. 146. Disease vs. the rise of civilisation - The Rest Is History | Acast

    Listen to 146. Disease vs. the rise of civilisation from The Rest Is History. The way we die has been utterly transformed.There have been around 10,000 generations of human beings, but only in the last 3 or 4 have infectious diseases not been an expected and accepted cause of death.What drove the most deadly infectious diseases? Was technological progress and globalisation one of the key causes for its spread over the course of history?Tom and Dominic are joined by Professor Kyle Harper from the University of Oklahoma to discuss the fascinating history of disease and how shifts in the way we die have changed our world completely.Producer: Dom JohnsonExec Producer: Tony PastorJoin The Rest Is History Club for ad-free listening to the full archive, weekly bonus episodes, live streamed shows and access to an exclusive chatroom community.Twitter:@TheRestHistory@holland_tom@dcsandbrookEmail: restishistorypod@gmail.com

    https://shows.acast.com/the-rest-is-history-podcast/episodes/146-disease-vs-the-rise-of-civilisation

    —Huffduffed by crushh

  2. Stuff You Missed in History Class

    Polio: The Dread Disease — Polio was a terrifying threat in the early 20th century: It often left victims paralyzed or dead. Yet two vaccines caused an immediate drop in polio cases and today they’ve nearly eradicated the disease. But what exactly happened? Tune in to find out.

    —Huffduffed by TrentVich

  3. The Plague Cycle: The Unending War Between Humanity and Infectious Disease

    Join Judy Woodruff and Charles Kenny as they discuss Kenny’s new book, The Plague Cycle, a history of mankind’s battles with infectious disease. The Plague Cycle examines the relationship between civilization, globalization, prosperity, and infectious disease over the past five millennia through to the pandemic of Covid-19. Harnessing history, economics, and public health, it charts the impact of remarkable progress against disease but also the considerable threats that remain.

    https://www.cgdev.org/event/plague-cycle-unending-war-between-humanity-and-infectious-disease

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    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Q5NSJQ8iFk
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Fri Jan 29 16:22:20 2021 Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by smithtjosh

  4. Caustic Soda: Leprosy

    Microbiologist Jenna Capyk joins Joe, Toren, and Kevin to talk about Hansen’s disease, also known as leprosy. What the heck is it? Does it cause your body parts to fall off? Are there any other animals that can get leprosy? What have we done in the past to keep lepers separate from society? All these questions and more are answered in this episode of Caustic Soda!

    —Huffduffed by thickets

  5. Patient Zero

    The greatest mysteries have a shadowy figure at the center—someone who sets things in motion and holds the key to how the story unfolds. In epidemiology, this central character is known as Patient Zero—the case at the heart of an outbreak. This hour, Radiolab hunts for Patient Zeroes from all over the map.

    Patient Zero? Podcasts More We start with the story of perhaps the most iconic Patient Zero of all time: Typhoid Mary. Then, we dive into a molecular detective story to pinpoint the beginning of the AIDS, and we re-imagine the moment the virus that caused the global pandemic sprang to life. After that, we’re left wondering if you can trace the spread of an idea the way you can trace the spread of a disease. In the end, we find ourselves faced with a choice between competing claims about the origin of the high five. And we come to a perfectly sensible, thoroughly disturbing conclusion about the nature of the universe … all by way of the cowboy hat.

    —Huffduffed by hba2012

  6. How Less Sleep Increases Your Risk of Disease: Forum | KQED Public Media for Northern CA

    More and more Americans are sleeping less and less. That’s according to data from the Centers for Disease Control that show a growing number of people sleep less than six hours a night. And research shows people who sleep less are at greater risk for heart disease, obesity and diabetes. We talk with experts about all things sleep.

    http://www.kqed.org/a/forum/R201408261000

    —Huffduffed by gillibrand