Rob / tags / web

Tagged with “web” (10)

  1. Web Directions @media 2011: Jeremy Keith — Panel: Hot Topics

    A popular @media tradition, hosted by Jeremy Keith, the final session for day one will feature a selection of speakers discussing questions posed by conference attendees. A lively conversation and some passionate debate will occur, so bring along your questions and enjoy the robust discussion.

    http://www.webdirections.org/resources/jeremy-keith-panel-hot-topics/

    —Huffduffed by Rob

  2. Webinar: How to design and prototype for mobile devices with Josh Clark, by Amir Khella

    Josh is a leading authority on mobile design, and author of TapWorthy: Designing great iPhone apps. In this interview, he answers questions about the differences between designing for web and for mobile, how to start with mobile design, how to design cross-platform apps, and how to test mobile apps with users. A crash course on designing and testing interactive user interfaces using Apple Keynote or Microsoft Powerpoint Keynotopia User Interface Libraries.Topics include:how to define and plan the user experiencehow to integrate wireframing/prototyping into the product lifecyclehow to decide the level of fidelity and details of prototypeshow to test with usershow to iterate user feedbackhow to move from prototyping to productionnbsp;Udemy is a website that enables anyone to teach and learn online. Udemy tries to democratize online education by making it fast, easy and free to create online courses. Udemy is an open platform, so anyone can build an online course by posting videos, presentations, writing articles, or hosting live virtual classroom sessions.

    http://www.udemy.com/lectures/webinar-how-to-design-and-prototype-for-mobile-devices-with-josh-clark-39028.html?utm_source=Keynotopi

    —Huffduffed by Rob

  3. Discussing Interface Design With Robert Hoekman Jr.

    On February 26th, 2007, Robert Hoekman Jr., author of Designing the Obvious: A Common Sense Approach to Web Application Design, spoke to Aarron Walter’s User Centered Interface Design class at The Art Institute of Atlanta via Skype. The topic of our conversation was Robert’s current work as an Interaction Designer and Usability Specialist, and his task-centric design approach that, instead of focusing on nebulous personas, focus on how tasks are performed. Once a task is fully understood, the knowledge can be extrapolated to any demographic.

    —Huffduffed by Rob

  4. Shane Morris — Interaction design school 101

    When I first picked up Matthew Frederick’s book: “101 Things I Learned in Architecture School” I was struck by the num ber of prin ci ples of archi tec ture that can be directly applied to inter ac tion design, but also dis il lu sioned by the fact that Interaction Designers gen er ally do not have a sim i lar body of knowl edge to draw on. Sure we have lots of “process”, but rel a tively lit tle “wis dom” of the sort found in this book.

    The field of Interaction Design isn’t very old — If we’re talk ing purely soft ware inter­face design, then let’s say about 25 years old. No sur prise, then, that we bor row heav­ily (and unashamedly) from a range of other, more estab lished, dis ci plines. We try to com pen sate for our rel a tive lack of a his tory, tra di tion or body of knowl edge by lever­ag ing oth ers’. That’s entirely appro pri ate — but how far does it get us? Interaction Design is an essen tial com po nent of the deliv ery of vir tu ally any prod uct or ser vice today. Many of us may already be at the point where we inter act with more dig i tal prod ucts in a day than we do phys i cal prod ucts, and many of the most impor tant trans ac tions in our lives are entirely vir tual. Maybe Interaction Design needs to be taken a bit more seriously?

    In this talk I’d like to reflect on my almost 20 years as an inter ac tion designer — the things I’ve learned along the way, and the things I wish I would have learned at Interaction Design School, if such a thing had existed back then. Along the way we’ll review some of the 101 things we all should have learned in Interaction Design School, sourced from ixd101​.com (the blog I share with Matt Morphett), and beyond.

    —Huffduffed by Rob

  5. Icon-o-cast: What Makes a Great Service?

    Connections - Feb. 19, 2009: What makes a great service? How can designers influence the experience customers have with grocery stores, airlines and car rental agencies? Jennifer Bove of Huge and Ben Fullerton of IDEO talk with Lunar’s Gretchen Anderson about service design.

    http://iconocast.typepad.com/iconocast/2009/02/what-makes-a-great-service.html

    —Huffduffed by Rob

  6. Relly Annett-​​Baker — All the small things

    Microcopy is the ninja of online con tent. Fast, furi ous and deadly, it has the power to make or break your online busi ness, to kill or stay your foes. It’s a sen tence, a con fir­ma tion, a few words. One word, even. It isn’t big or flashy. It doesn’t leave a call ing card. If it does its job your cus tomer may never notice it was there.

    http://www.webdirections.org/resources/relly-annett-baker-all-the-small-things/

    —Huffduffed by Rob

  7. Mark Boulton — Designing grid systems

    Grid sys tems have been used in print design, archi tec ture and inte rior design for gen­er a tions. Now, on the web, the same rules of grid sys tem com po si tion and usage no longer apply. Content is viewed in many ways; from RSS feeds to email. Content is viewed on many devices; from mobile phones to lap tops. Users can manip u late the browser, they can remove con tent, resize the can vas, resize the type faces. A designer is no longer in con trol of this pre sen ta tion. So where do grid sys tems fit in to all that?

    http://www.webdirections.org/resources/mark-boulton-designing-grid-systems/

    —Huffduffed by Rob

  8. CSS3 Design with HTML5

    As HTML5 and CSS3 gets written, browser vendors are already incorporating their new features allowing for greater design and functionality. However, some major browsers haven’t. How should developers build for a constantly moving target? This panel discusses dealing with those older browsers and embracing new Web design technologies with practical HTML5 and CSS3 demonstrations.

    From http://sxsw.com/node/5013

    —Huffduffed by Rob