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Tagged with “in” (14)

  1. Webinar: How to design and prototype for mobile devices with Josh Clark, by Amir Khella

    Josh is a leading authority on mobile design, and author of TapWorthy: Designing great iPhone apps. In this interview, he answers questions about the differences between designing for web and for mobile, how to start with mobile design, how to design cross-platform apps, and how to test mobile apps with users. A crash course on designing and testing interactive user interfaces using Apple Keynote or Microsoft Powerpoint Keynotopia User Interface Libraries.Topics include:how to define and plan the user experiencehow to integrate wireframing/prototyping into the product lifecyclehow to decide the level of fidelity and details of prototypeshow to test with usershow to iterate user feedbackhow to move from prototyping to productionnbsp;Udemy is a website that enables anyone to teach and learn online. Udemy tries to democratize online education by making it fast, easy and free to create online courses. Udemy is an open platform, so anyone can build an online course by posting videos, presentations, writing articles, or hosting live virtual classroom sessions.

    http://www.udemy.com/lectures/webinar-how-to-design-and-prototype-for-mobile-devices-with-josh-clark-39028.html?utm_source=Keynotopi

    —Huffduffed by Rob

  2. Discussing Interface Design With Robert Hoekman Jr.

    On February 26th, 2007, Robert Hoekman Jr., author of Designing the Obvious: A Common Sense Approach to Web Application Design, spoke to Aarron Walter’s User Centered Interface Design class at The Art Institute of Atlanta via Skype. The topic of our conversation was Robert’s current work as an Interaction Designer and Usability Specialist, and his task-centric design approach that, instead of focusing on nebulous personas, focus on how tasks are performed. Once a task is fully understood, the knowledge can be extrapolated to any demographic.

    —Huffduffed by Rob

  3. A Touchy History of the Future

    We pinch it, tap it, shake it and poke it. We’re so enthralled with finally getting to touch our products. But there’s so much more to direct manipulation than just tapping it with our fingers! Let’s explore some progressive interaction models that go beyond touch and into movement, infrared, wearable computing, sound and ambient data to really give us an idea of what our immersive interactive future may hold and how we might curate that future now.

    http://my.sxsw.com/events/event/7498

    —Huffduffed by Rob

  4. Shane Morris — Interaction design school 101

    When I first picked up Matthew Frederick’s book: “101 Things I Learned in Architecture School” I was struck by the num ber of prin ci ples of archi tec ture that can be directly applied to inter ac tion design, but also dis il lu sioned by the fact that Interaction Designers gen er ally do not have a sim i lar body of knowl edge to draw on. Sure we have lots of “process”, but rel a tively lit tle “wis dom” of the sort found in this book.

    The field of Interaction Design isn’t very old — If we’re talk ing purely soft ware inter­face design, then let’s say about 25 years old. No sur prise, then, that we bor row heav­ily (and unashamedly) from a range of other, more estab lished, dis ci plines. We try to com pen sate for our rel a tive lack of a his tory, tra di tion or body of knowl edge by lever­ag ing oth ers’. That’s entirely appro pri ate — but how far does it get us? Interaction Design is an essen tial com po nent of the deliv ery of vir tu ally any prod uct or ser vice today. Many of us may already be at the point where we inter act with more dig i tal prod ucts in a day than we do phys i cal prod ucts, and many of the most impor tant trans ac tions in our lives are entirely vir tual. Maybe Interaction Design needs to be taken a bit more seriously?

    In this talk I’d like to reflect on my almost 20 years as an inter ac tion designer — the things I’ve learned along the way, and the things I wish I would have learned at Interaction Design School, if such a thing had existed back then. Along the way we’ll review some of the 101 things we all should have learned in Interaction Design School, sourced from ixd101​.com (the blog I share with Matt Morphett), and beyond.

    —Huffduffed by Rob

  5. SpoolCast: The History of Interaction with Bill Verplank

    A fascinating discussion with Bill Verplank about the early days of of interaction design.

    His discussion of the three paradigms of interaction design (computer as intelligence/brain, computer as person/life, computer as agent) is superb.

    From http://www.uie.com/brainsparks/2008/09/02/spoolcast-the-history-of-interaction-with-bill-verplank/

    —Huffduffed by Rob

  6. Strategic interaction design

    Interaction design is often focused at the interface between a person and a system in the form of a series of request-response actions. But interaction design can be positioned at the strategic level when the interaction designer looks at the transition between interactions & touchpoints; and the aggregate effect of these interactions on the overall service experience.

    —Huffduffed by Rob

  7. Where good ideas come from

    People often credit their ideas to individual "Eureka!" moments. But Steven Johnson shows how history tells a different story. His fascinating tour takes us from the "liquid networks" of London’s coffee houses to Charles Darwin’s long, slow hunch to today’s high-velocity web.

    —Huffduffed by Rob

  8. Brian Greene: A Physicist Explains ‘The Hidden Reality’ Of Parallel Universes : NPR

    It is possible that there are many other universes that exist parallel to our universe. Theoretical physicist Brian Greene, author of The Elegant Universe, explains how that’s possible in the new book, The Hidden Reality.

    http://www.npr.org/2011/01/24/132932268/a-physicist-explains-why-parallel-universes-may-exist?&sc=tumblr

    —Huffduffed by Rob

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