Rob / tags / conference

Tagged with “conference” (8)

  1. Web Directions @media 2011: Jeremy Keith — Panel: Hot Topics

    A popular @media tradition, hosted by Jeremy Keith, the final session for day one will feature a selection of speakers discussing questions posed by conference attendees. A lively conversation and some passionate debate will occur, so bring along your questions and enjoy the robust discussion.

    http://www.webdirections.org/resources/jeremy-keith-panel-hot-topics/

    —Huffduffed by Rob

  2. A Touchy History of the Future

    We pinch it, tap it, shake it and poke it. We’re so enthralled with finally getting to touch our products. But there’s so much more to direct manipulation than just tapping it with our fingers! Let’s explore some progressive interaction models that go beyond touch and into movement, infrared, wearable computing, sound and ambient data to really give us an idea of what our immersive interactive future may hold and how we might curate that future now.

    http://my.sxsw.com/events/event/7498

    —Huffduffed by Rob

  3. Shane Morris — Interaction design school 101

    When I first picked up Matthew Frederick’s book: “101 Things I Learned in Architecture School” I was struck by the num ber of prin ci ples of archi tec ture that can be directly applied to inter ac tion design, but also dis il lu sioned by the fact that Interaction Designers gen er ally do not have a sim i lar body of knowl edge to draw on. Sure we have lots of “process”, but rel a tively lit tle “wis dom” of the sort found in this book.

    The field of Interaction Design isn’t very old — If we’re talk ing purely soft ware inter­face design, then let’s say about 25 years old. No sur prise, then, that we bor row heav­ily (and unashamedly) from a range of other, more estab lished, dis ci plines. We try to com pen sate for our rel a tive lack of a his tory, tra di tion or body of knowl edge by lever­ag ing oth ers’. That’s entirely appro pri ate — but how far does it get us? Interaction Design is an essen tial com po nent of the deliv ery of vir tu ally any prod uct or ser vice today. Many of us may already be at the point where we inter act with more dig i tal prod ucts in a day than we do phys i cal prod ucts, and many of the most impor tant trans ac tions in our lives are entirely vir tual. Maybe Interaction Design needs to be taken a bit more seriously?

    In this talk I’d like to reflect on my almost 20 years as an inter ac tion designer — the things I’ve learned along the way, and the things I wish I would have learned at Interaction Design School, if such a thing had existed back then. Along the way we’ll review some of the 101 things we all should have learned in Interaction Design School, sourced from ixd101​.com (the blog I share with Matt Morphett), and beyond.

    —Huffduffed by Rob

  4. Information Is Beautiful

    In an age of high-speed living and info overload, visualized information has incredible potential to help us quickly understand, navigate and find meaning in a complex world.

    The use of infographics, data visualisations and information design is a rising trend across many disciplines: science, design, journalism and web. At the same time, daily exposure to the web is creating a incredibly design-literate population. Could this be a new language?

    In his session, David will share his passion for this merging of design, information, text and story to unveil some of the interesting, unexpected and sometimes magical things that happen when you visualise data, knowledge and ideas. And, admitting that his book is as full of mistakes as it is successes, he’ll also explore some of the common pitfalls, traps and FAILS that dog this young design form.

    Using examples from his book and blog, he’ll share thoughts on what makes a successful information visualisation and journalistic tips, especially for designers, on how to zero in on interesting data and subjects—and how designing information can expose your own biases and change your views about the world. Oh yeah!

    http://2010.dconstruct.org/speakers/david-mccandless

    David McCandless is a London-based author, data-journalist and information designer, working across print, advertising, TV and web. His design work has appeared in over forty publications internationally including The Guardian and Wired. He champions the use of data visualisations to explore new directions for journalism and to discover new stories in the seas of data surrounding us. His blog and book ‘Information Is Beautiful’ are dedicated to visualising ideas, issues, knowledge and data—all with the minimum of text.

    —Huffduffed by Rob

  5. Relly Annett-​​Baker — All the small things

    Microcopy is the ninja of online con tent. Fast, furi ous and deadly, it has the power to make or break your online busi ness, to kill or stay your foes. It’s a sen tence, a con fir­ma tion, a few words. One word, even. It isn’t big or flashy. It doesn’t leave a call ing card. If it does its job your cus tomer may never notice it was there.

    http://www.webdirections.org/resources/relly-annett-baker-all-the-small-things/

    —Huffduffed by Rob

  6. Mark Boulton — Designing grid systems

    Grid sys tems have been used in print design, archi tec ture and inte rior design for gen­er a tions. Now, on the web, the same rules of grid sys tem com po si tion and usage no longer apply. Content is viewed in many ways; from RSS feeds to email. Content is viewed on many devices; from mobile phones to lap tops. Users can manip u late the browser, they can remove con tent, resize the can vas, resize the type faces. A designer is no longer in con trol of this pre sen ta tion. So where do grid sys tems fit in to all that?

    http://www.webdirections.org/resources/mark-boulton-designing-grid-systems/

    —Huffduffed by Rob

  7. Elements of a Networked Urbanism by Adam Greenfield

    Over the past several years, we’ve watched as a very wide variety of objects and surfaces familiar from everyday life have been reimagined as networked information-gathering, -processing, -storage and -display resources. Why should cities be any different?

    What happens to urban form and metropolitan experience under such circumstances? What are the implications for us, as designers, consumers and as citizens?

    http://2009.dconstruct.org/schedule/adamgreenfield/

    Adam Greenfield lives in a city and thinks you probably do, too.

    —Huffduffed by Rob

  8. CSS3 Design with HTML5

    As HTML5 and CSS3 gets written, browser vendors are already incorporating their new features allowing for greater design and functionality. However, some major browsers haven’t. How should developers build for a constantly moving target? This panel discusses dealing with those older browsers and embracing new Web design technologies with practical HTML5 and CSS3 demonstrations.

    From http://sxsw.com/node/5013

    —Huffduffed by Rob