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Radiculous / collective

There are two people in Radiculous’s collective.

Huffduffed (1773)

  1. THE ENTREPRENEURS: Do one thing well

    Years ago former advertising copywriter David Hieatt left London with his family for the Welsh town of Cardigan, once home to the largest jeans factory in Britain. Since then, he and his wife Clare sold their popular T-shirt company Howies, built the much-loved brand Hiut Denim and created a three-day rural retreat in their old cow barn called The Do Lectures. This week on The Entrepreneurs David shares the secrets to building long-lasting brands and the big takeaways of his purpose-driven career.

    —Huffduffed by briansuda

  2. EPISODE 102: GORILLAZ

    Gorillaz is a creation of musician Damon Albarn and artist Jamie Hewlett. They’re a virtual band made up four animated characters. The songs are written by Damon Albarn and a roster of collaborators. Since the first album was released in 2001, Gorillaz have sold over 16 million records worldwide. In this episode, Damon breaks down the song “Andromeda” from the 2017 Gorillaz album Humanz. The song features guest vocals by D.R.A.M., a rapper and singer whose own hit single, “Broccoli,” went quadruple platinum in 2016. D.R.A.M. tells the story of how he got involved with this track, and Damon shares an exclusive clip of a scrapped version of the song with D.R.A.M. on lead vocals.

    —Huffduffed by briansuda

  3. Meet the writer: Danny Wallace

    As a film-maker, comedian, radio and TV presenter, actor and bestselling author, Danny Wallace is a man of many talents. He’s formed a cult, created a country and spent months just saying “yes” – a project that became a hugely successful film starring Jim Carrey. Wallace joins Georgina Godwin to chat about his new book, in which he asks why we are all so bloody rude.

    —Huffduffed by briansuda

  4. Episode 12: Linda Eliasen

    In our latest Overtime episode, Dan chats with Linda Eliasen—a designer, illustrator, art director, and all-around creative. Linda currently freelances in NYC, but before that, she worked at Ueno, Dropbox, Mailchimp, and Squarespace.

    Linda Eliasen Art Director, Designer, Illustrator In this episode, Linda walks us through her illustration workflow and shares her process for creating production-ready work with the Apple Pencil and iPad Pro. In addition, you’ll learn about Iceland’s terrifying Yule Cat. She also shares the story behind Dropbox’s recruiting video starring puppets. Lastly, Linda talks about her recent move to New York to try something new—improv. “It’s awesome to be at the stage in my career, where I’ve been doing what I’ve been doing for 9 years. To start over—it feels like being a brand new baby junior designer.”

    —Huffduffed by briansuda

  5. Episode 293: THE ENTREPRENEURS Making sense of the world

    Jan Chipchase is the founder of Studio D Radiodurans, a consultancy that’s perhaps like none other in the world. He and his team travel to the far edges of the earth on behalf of clients to immerse themselves in difficult environments and understand human behaviour. He’s recently distilled his years of experience into a beautiful crowdfunded guide called ‘The Field Study Handbook’. This week Jan shares lessons for travelling anywhere, making sense of the world and making a difference.

    —Huffduffed by briansuda

  6. Dribbble - Show and tell for designers, Episode 14: Aaron Draplin

    Our guest on Overtime episode 14 is Aaron Draplin of Draplin Design Co. In this episode, Dan and Aaron discuss dropping the jargon and talking about graphic design in normal terms, how Aaron uses Instagram, why he doesn’t waste time policing the internet, why he believes everyone deserves great design, who inspires him, and the challenges of shipping merch and managing work while touring. This episode is brought to you by MyFonts.

    https://dribbble.com/overtime/2017/05/23/episode-14-aaron-draplin

    —Huffduffed by briansuda

  7. Power Rangers: Haim Saban

    As a refugee growing up in Tel Aviv, Haim Saban remembers not having enough money to eat. As an adult, he hustled his way into the entertainment business, writing theme songs for classic cartoons like Inspector Gadget and Heathcliff. But producing the mega-hit Mighty Morphin Power Rangers put him on track to becoming a billionaire media titan.

    —Huffduffed by briansuda

  8. Iceland’s Triumph

    No nation fell as far during the 2008 global financial crisis as Iceland. But unlike other countries Iceland decided to hold those responsible for the crash to account. Now, nine years on, the country has recovered. What can other nations learn from Iceland’s actions?

    —Huffduffed by briansuda

  9. The Entrepreneurs: Eureka 43: Urbanito

    Eureka 43: Urbanito: Simon and Elaine MacKenzie are the husband-and-wife team behind new family-friendly city-guide brand Urbanito. While travelling with their children the Scottish duo discovered a lack of smart and stylish travel guides that catered to curious kids as well as their parents – so they decided to make one themselves. They share their story.

    —Huffduffed by briansuda

  10. The most robot-proof job of them all

    Five years ago, Marketplace explored how machines, robots and software algorithms were increasingly entering the workforce in our series "Robots Ate My Job." Now, we’re looking at what humans can do about it with a new journey to find robot-proof jobs.

    The way the Trump administration sees it, the move to harden our borders is about national security and preserving jobs in the U.S. But moving forward, the real competition for work may come from machines, software and robots. Some jobs will be replaced, some jobs will be changed and some jobs will thrive.

    Dave Rollinson is in that third category. Five years ago, Rollinson was a graduate student at Carnegie Mellon University studying snake robots used for search and rescue. Now he’s a co-founder of HEBI Robotics, a startup that makes electronic building blocks that serve as the shoulder, elbow or knee of almost any robot someone might construct.

    "We were kind of inspired by Lego," Rollinson said. "We want to get to the point where people can put these together as easily and intuitively as Lego." If HEBI can manage to do that, there could be a big payoff. But for now, his No. 1 worry is finding people with the right skills to hire.

    "You’ve whittled your set down to probably, like, a handful of people in the world that can really do what it is that you’re trying to do," Rollinson said. "It’s probably our No. 1 concern as we grow is just finding the right people." Across town, at Rollinson’s alma mater, they see it this way, too.

    RELATED: Say hello to your robot co-worker Trump keeps talking about trade but he should be talking robots "This is the real concern," said David Bourne, principal systems scientist at CMU’s Robotics Institute. "It’s not what jobs robots are going to steal, it’s that people aren’t going to be ready to do the jobs that they need to do."

    Bourne said the bottleneck might be lack of faculty. Many potential teachers with robotics skills are being swallowed up by private companies, like Uber, which hired away four CMU professors and 36 researchers to work on its self-driving cars.

    "Just to give you an example, in one of our programs, we had 600 applications and there were 40 spots," Bourne said. "That should give you pause. You know, there’s a lot of people that can’t do the field they want to do."

    Anca Dragan is one of those select few who can. Originally from Romania, she earned a graduate degree from Carnegie Mellon’s robotics program and now researches the interaction between humans and robots at University of California, Berkeley.

    "It was just what I was passionate about. I loved math and I did math competitions," Dragan said. "I was raised in a country where math is, like, our national sport." Her early inspiration was a book on artificial intelligence that she came across in high school, co-authored by Berkeley professor Stuart Russell.

    "Now, I get to be a colleague of Stuart’s, and he’s just a few offices away," she said. "It’s really interesting to think of where I was in 12th grade and sort of the luck that I have now."

    "Luck” in the sense that you make your own luck, but also the luck of being born in Romania, a country that honors math and science achievements. The question is can the U.S. change its culture and rewire its economy to make these skills available to the many, rather than the few?

    —Huffduffed by briansuda

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