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Radiculous / collective

There are two people in Radiculous’s collective.

Huffduffed (1754)

  1. What are tinnovators?

    Tinnovators are folks who come up with new and innovative ways to use old Altoids mint tins. Learn about some of these "tinnovators" and their art in this podcast from HowStuffWorks.com.

    —Huffduffed by briansuda

  2. More than the meatballs: The economic enigma of Ikea

    What would Thanksgiving be without a nice couch to go flop on after a day of gluttony…

    Consider the couch — or chair or coffee table — for a second and there’s a good chance it came from the yellow and blue juggernaut of the furniture world known as Ikea.

    But for all of its streamlined Northern European goodness, it turns out there are plenty of economic mysteries that go on behind the scenes at Ikea.

    Oliver Roeder is a senior writer for FiveThirtyEight and spoke with Molly Wood about his piece, titled "The Weird Economics of Ikea.”

    —Huffduffed by briansuda

  3. Track Changes #0039: Cathy O’Neil on “Weapons of Math Destruction”

    Our dangerous reliance on big data: in an episode recorded before the election, Rich and Paul talk to Cathy O’Neil, author of Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increases Inequality and Threatens Democracy. They discuss Cathy’s origins in the math world, her years at a hedge fund on the brink of the 2008 financial crisis, the lack of transparency in the Department of Education’s data, and the various examples of “weapons of math destruction” in her book—all the ways that data is used to harm.

    ===
    Original video: https://soundcloud.com/postlighttrackchanges/cathy-oneil-on-weapons-of-math
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Tue, 15 Nov 2016 15:49:56 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by briansuda

  4. EPISODE 84: PETER BJORN AND JOHN

    In 2006, Swedish trio Peter Bjorn and John released their third album, Writer’s Block. For months and months after that, it felt like you couldn’t go anywhere without hearing the first single from that album, “Young Folks.” It was on top 10 lists for song of the year in places like Pitchfork and NME. It’s been covered by James Blunt, and remixed by Kanye West, along with countless other versions out there. Now, ten years later, Peter Bjorn and John break down the song and how it all came together, and how it almost didn’t come together at all.

    —Huffduffed by briansuda

  5. Section D: To the letter

    A look at some of the latest developments and enduring stories in typography and lettering. We check in with TPTQ Arabic, a type foundry in The Hague focused on developing high-quality Arabic typefaces and we chat with Jonathan Hoefler, head of New York foundry Hoefler & Co, who takes us through the company’s new typeface Operator. Plus: we look at Italy’s sign heritage and survey the best pens on show at Paperworld in Frankfurt.

    —Huffduffed by briansuda

  6. TeeVee | “Stranger Things”: Season 1 review (Episode 187)

    187

    “Stranger Things”: Season 1 review

    Grab your Wrist Rockets and toast some Eggos—it’s time to talk Stranger Things! Even though only one of our panel was alive when the show takes place, we talk ’80s influences, our favorite characters, theories about Season 2, and much more.

    August

    6, 2016

    1 hour, 9 minutes

    Brian Hamilton

    with Joe Rosensteel, Mikah Sargent, Allison Truj and Yasmine Evjen

    Download

    (31 M)

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    "Stranger Things": Season 1 review

    Grab your Wrist Rockets and toast some Eggos—it’s time to talk Stranger Things! Even though only one of our panel was alive when the show takes place, we talk ’80s influences, our favorite characters, theories about Season 2, and much more.

    Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus.

    https://www.theincomparable.com/teevee/187/index.php

    —Huffduffed by hcleong

  7. Hippy Internet - The Whole Earth Catalog

    Sukhdev Sandhu travels to the epicentres of countercultural America in Woodstock and San Francisco to tell the story of a book of hippy philosophy that defined the 1960s and intimated how the internet would grow long before the web arrived. With Luc Sante, Eliot Weinberger, Kenneth Goldsmith, Ed Sanders, Lois Britton, and Fred Turner Producer: Tim Dee.

    —Huffduffed by briansuda

  8. While My Guitar Gently Bleeps

    A plumber eating a mushroom, and a spiny mammal jumping on a golden ring - you’d be forgiven for thinking these actions would make pretty indistinct or ambiguous sounds. But comedian, writer and musician Isy Suttie discovers why - thanks to Super Mario and Sonic the Hedgehog - they’re some of the most evocative sounds of the 1980s and 90s. Along with these sounds, the plinky plonky music of early video games buried itself inside a generation of ears growing up among Commodores, Ataris, Segas and Nintendos. Loosely referred to as "chiptune", many musicians and producers now use the jagged, electronic textures in their songs, going to great lengths to deliberately limit their audio palette for the sake of authenticity; some even rip apart old computers and consoles to build instruments faithful to the original sounds. Its ubiquity in film and TV scores is another testament to its efficiency in evoking that era.

    Isy traces the evolution of chiptune from early electronic music, looking at how composers like Hirokazu Tanaka and Koji Kondo created the catchy and unmistakeable themes of Tetris and Super Mario Brothers. She meets current chiptune artists, including the band whose instruments are joysticks and game controllers, and uses their advice to write her own digital classic. But can she convince the organisers of a die-hard gaming event to use it as their theme tune, and survive silicon scrutiny? Produced by Benn Cordrey.

    —Huffduffed by briansuda

  9. An Obsessive Type: The Tale of the Doves Typeface

    Can a long lost design classic be rediscovered at the bottom of the Thames? The obsessive search for the lost Doves typeface of the influential craftsman TJ Cobden-Sanderson.

    In 1916 TJ Cobden-Sanderson threw his precious Doves typeface into the Thames after a bitter row with his business partner. Almost 100 years later designer Robert Green set out on a four year long search to restore it for the digital age.

    A peer of William Morris, TJ Cobden-Sanderson first became known among the proponents of Arts and Crafts and even coined the term. But it was later at the turn of the 20th century that he became a leader of the British Private Press movement seeking to revive the tradition of the book as an object of art and manual skill. In 1900 he established the Doves Press along with Emery Walker in London’s Hammersmith. But when they fell out Cobden-Sanderson sabotaged their greatest achievement. He threw every piece of the Doves type into the Thames from Hammersmith Bridge. The only record of the drowned type was the handful of valuable printed books.

    A century later and graphic designer Robert Green nervously paces along the Thames riverbank. This trip is the culmination of four years of his life and his art. He has persuaded the Port of London Authority divers to look for minuscule metal letters buried at the bottom of the river.

    Robert has spent years painstakingly reconstructing the Doves Type. Using Cobden-Sanderson’s diary entries, he believes he has located the place on the river where the type was thrown. This is the story of Robert’s riverbed search reappraising the impact and legacy of the craftsmanship of the Doves Press and its co-creator Cobden-Sanderson.

    Presenter and produced by Nicky Birch A Somethin’ Else Production for Radio 4.

    —Huffduffed by briansuda

  10. How Apple obsessive John Gruber built Daring Fireball, the world’s most powerful one-man media company - Recode

    Since 2002, Gruber has owned a chunk of the conversation about Apple — and he does it all solo.

    http://www.recode.net/2016/6/30/12053348/john-gruber-daring-fireball-apple-podcast-recode-media

    —Huffduffed by hcleong

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