Preoccupations / David Smith

There are no people in Preoccupations’s collective.

Huffduffed (4)

  1. Tom Armitage on CBC Radio

    "This afternoon, I interviewed Tom Armitage. He’s a software designer who recently came to our attention because of a talk he gave recently, called "If Gamers Ran the World." In it, he puts forth the idea that in another 10 years, leaders who are the same age as Barack Obama or British Conservative Party leader David Cameron are now, will be children of the 1970s, and as such, more than likely the first leaders who grew up with video games as a core part of their way of interact with the world around them. What would that mean for how they would behave as leaders? A shorter version of this interview airs on the Jan 7th and 10th episode of Spark" — http://www.cbc.ca/spark/blog/2009/01/full_interview_tom_armitage.html

    —Huffduffed by Preoccupations

  2. Lisa Jardine ponders the effect of recession on the lingerie industry … both today and in Tudor times.

    BBC, A Point of View: "The neck frill grew oversized, into the elaborate, face-framing ruffs which for many of us define late Tudor dress, as it features in any number of formal portraits of royalty and nobility. Starching these became a laundry skill in its own right - the very first specialist ruff-launderer in England is supposed to have been a Flemish woman, Mistress Dingen Van der Passe, who brought Dutch-standard starching to London in 1564. Detached ruffs and decorative cuffs were securely attached to the outer garments for each wearing, using metal pins. It has been suggested that in economic terms, these pins are the first genuinely disposable commodities of emerging consumer culture, since they were bought in bulk, used once and then discarded (though there are records of the more frugal having their bent pins straightened for re-use). Even without integral layered and embroidered neck-frills and cuffs, the amount of coloured embroidery on the upper part of shirt and smock continued to grow, transforming the simple undergarment into an object of beauty in its own right." Full text at http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/magazine/7689554.stm.

    —Huffduffed by Preoccupations

  3. Beyond the Shock Machine

    ABC Radio National: "In the summer of 1961 Stanley Milgram, a 27-year-old associate professor of psychology at Yale University, conducted a series of controversial experiments designed to test the limits of obedience. Volunteers in the experiment were told to give electric shocks to a person they could hear screaming in pain in the room next door. Seemingly ordinary people turned into torturers. Much has been written about Milgram and his experiments. But there’s a missing part to the story — the voices of people who took part. Gina Perry goes in search of those who participated in what’s been described as the most widely cited and provocative set of experiments in social psychology."

    —Huffduffed by Preoccupations