Tagged with “ethics” (13)

  1. Brian Cox on Robert Oppenheimer

    Significant international thinkers deliver the BBC’s flagship annual lecture series

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p05hctvq

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. Patterns Day: Paul Lloyd

    Paul Lloyd speaking at Patterns Day in Brighton on June 30, 2017.

    A one-day event for web designers and developers on design systems, pattern libraries, style guides, and components.

    Patterns Day is brought to you by Clearleft.

    https://patternsday.com/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. #71 — What Is Technology Doing to Us?

    In this episode of the Waking Up podcast, Sam Harris speaks with Tristan Harris about the arms race for human attention, the ethics of persuasion, the consequences of having an ad-based economy, the dynamics of regret, and other topics. You can support the Waking Up podcast at samharris.org/support.

    http://wakingup.libsyn.com/71-what-is-technology-doing-to-us

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. 258: Design Ethics with Robyn Kanner and Mike Monteiro - ShopTalk

    We’ve got Robyn Kanner and Mike Monteiro on the show to talk about ethics in design. When and, more importantly, how should you stand up to a manager when they tell you to design something in a way that feels wrong? Where do ethics and morals collide and how do we navigate that?

    http://shoptalkshow.com/episodes/258-design-ethics-robyn-kanner-mike-monteiro/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. Presentable #19: Design Ethics and the Race to the Bottom of the Brain Stem - Relay FM

    This week’s special guest is Tristan Harris, former Design Ethicist at Google and the founder of the Time Well Spent movement. We talk about ethics in design, and how even our best intentions in serving users can often make use of manipulative patterns.

    https://www.relay.fm/presentable/19

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. Let Us Now Praise Ordinary People – Mike Monteiro – btconfBER2016

    Everywhere you turn, companies are promising to change the world. But when the people already on top promise to change the world, you have to wonder how and for whom. The how isn’t usually in your benefit, and the for whom isn’t usually for you. The world is working exactly as they’ve designed it to work. So if we really want to change it, we need to change not just how we design it, but who is designing it.

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    Original video: https://vimeo.com/190834270
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Fri, 11 Nov 2016 15:44:28 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. Dark Patterns and Ada Lovelace - Tech Weekly podcast | Technology | The Guardian

    How user interfaces are designed to trick us. Plus, the legacy of Victorian computing pioneer Ada Lovelace.

    Ever subscribed to a mailing list by mistake? Booked travel insurance without noticing? Then you’ve fallen for a Dark Pattern.

    This week on the podcast we investigate the murky world of Dark Patterns: user interfaces that use psychological techniques to trick us into doing things we might otherwise not do.

    And as a new exhibition dedicated to Ada Lovelace opens at the Science Museum, we find out why the Victorian computing whizz is the hottest ticket in town 200 years on.

    Nathalie Nahai is joined by digital product designer Cennydd Bowles, Channel 4 News tech journalist Geoff White, designer Dan Lockton and Science Museum curator Tilly Blyth.

    http://www.theguardian.com/technology/audio/2015/oct/22/dark-patterns-ada-lovelace-tech-podcast

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  8. At MIT, an ethics class for inventors

    MIT’s Media Lab makes a strong claim to being the place where the future is designed. A class called Science Fiction to Science Fabrication, taught by researchers Dan Novy and Sophia Brueckner, makes that connection direct by using science fiction as an inspiration for real-world inventions.

    Sci-fi is full of imagined technologies, some plausible (killer robots), some far-out (time-traveling DeLoreans). Students in this class mine the work of authors like Philip K. Dick, Isaac Asimov, J. G. Ballard, Ray Bradbury, and William Gibson for ideas, such as an empathy testing machine like the one used to identify androids in Blade Runner.

    But most science fiction writers aren’t advocating that we build their technologies; they’re asking how we would use, or misuse, them. That’s exactly why Brueckner and Novy decided to put science fiction in front of the students at the MIT Media Lab. “Reading science fiction is kind of like ethics class for inventors,” says Brueckner. Traditionally, technology schools ask ‘how do we build it?’ This class asks a different question: ‘should we?’

    Novy adds, “With the ability of any technology or application to go viral over the planet in 24 hours, I think it is even more important to think about what you’re doing before you release it into the wild.”

    http://www.studio360.org/story/at-mit-ethics-class-for-inventors/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  9. Gabriella Coleman on the ethics of free software

    Gabriella Coleman, the Wolfe Chair in Scientific and Technological Literacy in the Art History and Communication Studies Department at McGill University, discusses her new book, “Coding Freedom: The Ethics and Aesthetics of Hacking,” which has been released under a Creative Commons license.

    Coleman, whose background is in anthropology, shares the results of her cultural survey of free and open source software (F/OSS) developers, the majority of whom, she found, shared similar backgrounds and world views. Among these similarities were an early introduction to technology and a passion for civil liberties, specifically free speech.

    Coleman explains the ethics behind hackers’ devotion to F/OSS, the social codes that guide its production, and the political struggles through which hackers question the scope and direction of copyright and patent law. She also discusses the tension between the overtly political free software movement and the “politically agnostic” open source movement, as well as what the future of the hacker movement may look like.

    http://surprisinglyfree.com/2013/01/08/gabriella-coleman-2/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  10. Point of Inquiry — George Lakoff

    George Lakoff is a cognitive linguist at the University of California at Berkeley. But unlike many of his scientific peers, he’s known as much for his work on politics as for his research.

    Lakoff the famed author of many books on why the left and right disagree about politics, including Moral Politics, Don’t Think of an Elephant, Thinking Points, and most recently, The Political Mind: Why You Can’t Understand 21st Century Politics with an 18th Century Brain.

    Throughout these works Lakoff has applied cognitive and linguistic analysis to our political rifts, and his ideas about "framing," "metaphor," and the different moral systems of liberals and conservatives have become very widely known and influential.

    —Huffduffed by briansuda

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