Tagged with “reading” (40)

  1. Kevin Kelly on The Inevitable, 60s Counterculture, and How to Read Better

    This week I was lucky enough to interview one of my favorite people: Kevin Kelly.

    Tim Ferriss refers to Kevin as the real-life, “Most Interesting Man In The World.”

    Kevin Kelly is one of the co-founders of Wired Magazine, a co-founder of the Quantified Self Movement, and serves on the board of The Long Now foundation.

    I’ve been endlessly inspired by Kevin. And it wouldn’t be fair not to mentioned his very early beginnings where he spent most of his 20s as a nomad (of sorts) traveling through Asia as a photographer for most of his 20s. He later published a book of his work titled Asia Grace.

    From there, in the 80s he joined Stewart Brand as the publisher and editor of The Whole Earth Review and was influential in both the 80s counterculture and startup movement.

    His writing in the 90s more or less predicted the Internet of today. His first book, Out of Control is brilliant – a few years after it was released it became required reading for all the actors on the set of the movie The Matrix. (which is how I first learned about it).

    He also has one of my favorite This American Life stories where has something of an epiphany about life, decides to live his life as if he will be dead in 6 months… gives away all his possessions, and then rides his bike across the country.

    In this episode we talk about:

    The Counterculture movement of the 60s

    Traveling as an act of rebellion

    Kevin’s latest book The Inevitable in which he writes that, “Much of what will happen in the next thirty years is inevitable, driven by technological trends that are already in motion.” He’ll share some of those predictions with us.

    Lessons on how to read better

    And… a book that Kevin wishes everyone in the world read at least one time.

    http://castig.org/kevin-kelly-on-the-inevitable-60s-counterculture-and-how-to-read-better/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. BBC Radio 4 - Word of Mouth, Reading: Print v eBooks

    Michael Rosen & Dr Laura Wright discuss with linguist Professor Naomi Baron the quantifiable differences between the experience of reading print books and of reading eBooks, or onscreen. Which allows for deeper reading and a stronger emotional response, and what is the future of reading?

    Producer Beth O’Dea

    Naomi S. Baron is the author of Words Onscreen: The Fate of Reading in a Digital World.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b06bnq18

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. Bookclub: Patrick O’Brian — Master and Commander

    With James Naughtie. In a special 200th edition of the programme we celebrate the centenary of author Patrick O’Brian and Allan Mallinson is our guide to the first in his hugely popular series of Napoleonic naval stories, Master and Commander. Known as the Aubrey/Maturin novels, the twenty books are regarded by many as the most engaging historical novels ever written. Master and Commander establishes the friendship between Captain Jack Aubrey and Stephen Maturin, who becomes his ship’s surgeon and an intelligence agent.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/podcasts/series/bc

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. John Hodgman reads from “More Information Than You Require” and Jonathan Coulton performs live at Coolidge

    This all-too-brief and face-hurtingly funny reading segued into the musical portion of evening, with a buckskin-shirt-and-coonskin-cap-clad Coulton laying down a few gems. Here’s the set list, with helpful time demarcations:

    • 37 min: An ode to Adama, Starbuck, those other wily Capricans, to the tune of the original Battlestar Galactica theme song
    • 39 min: "Tom Cruise Crazy," which is just as awesome as it sounds
    • 43 min: "The Future," a wistful sci-fi epic of adolescent angst
    • 47 min: "Brookline," Coulton’s chronicle of getting sucked into the charming-yet-Lovecraftian vortex that is Brookline, thanks to Hodgman’s nefarious influence
    • 52 min: "The Presidents," an "88 Lines About * 44 Women"-style ditty about all the presidents so far (a song that’s about to get a major retooling)
    • 57 min: The evening’s grand finale, a moment of musical/literary history that MAY NEVER BE REPEATED, in which Hodgman picks up a ukelele and joins Coulton in an adorably wobbly rendition of "Tonight You Belong to Me." Holy swoon.

    http://blog.thephoenix.com/blogs/phlog/archive/2008/10/30/podcast-john-hodgman-and-jonathan-coulton-live-at-coolidge-corner-theatre.aspx

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. Seamus Heaney reads from his translations at opening of International Society of Anglo-Saxonists Conference

    Nobel prize-winning poet Seamus Heaney, who has had a long and profound engagement with the literature of medieval England and Ireland, read a selection of his translations at the recent opening of the International Society of Anglo-Saxonists Biennial Conference.

    Beginning with extracts from his version of Beowulf, Heaney read a selection of his translations of Old English and Medieval Irish poetry as well as poems on medieval topics.

    Seamus Heaney was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1995.

    http://www.ucd.ie/news/2013/08AUG13/280913-Seamus-Heaney-read-from-his-translations-at-opening-of-International-Society-of-Anglo-Saxonists-Conference.html

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. William Gibson at The New York Public Library

    William Gibson is the author of ten books, including, most recently, the New York Times-bestselling trilogy Zero History, Spook Country and Pattern Recognition. Gibson’s 1984 debut novel, Neuromancer, was the first novel to win the three top science fiction prizes—the Hugo Award, the Nebula Award, and the Philip K. Dick Memorial Award. Gibson is credited with coining the term “cyberspace” in his short story “Burning Chrome,” and with popularizing the concept of the Internet while it was still largely unknown. He is also a co-author of the novel The Difference Engine, written with Bruce Sterling.

    http://www.nypl.org/audiovideo/william-gibson

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. RSA - Find a Voice Not Read a Script: Looking for the Heart of English

    RSA Debate 23rd Jan 2013; 18:00 (full recording including audience Q&A)

    What are the priorities for a new English curriculum? Should it enable our children and young people to be creative and communicate effectively in a global context, or is the most important thing to read and write accurately? Looking for the Heart of English involved 400 teachers discussing what really matters in learning English. The government has made proposals which do not meet the high expectations of these teachers and many others. The launch of Meeting High Expectations: will the new primary curriculum be good enough for our children? will bring out the vital learning which will enable young people to find their voices.

    This event is part of the continuing conversation about English teaching and what learners really need. The high profile discussion will contribute to the consultation on the government proposals for a new curriculum.

    The discussion will include those who contributed to the publication, including Michael Boyd, former artistic director, RSC; Chris Meade, co-director, If:book; Roger Billing, headteacher, Abbots Langley Primary School; and Jenny Lubuska, head of English, Hayes School.

    Chair: Sue Horner, leader in education and the arts and chair, RSA Academies Board.

    http://www.thersa.org/events/audio-and-past-events/2013/find-a-voice-not-read-a-script-looking-for-the-heart-of-english

    —Huffduffed by theJBJshow

  8. America’s Facebook Generation Is Reading Strong : NPR

    Young Americans are reading more than just status updates and 140-character tweets. A new study by the Pew Research Center shows that among 16- to 29-year-olds, 8 in 10 have read a book in the past year. That’s compared with 7 in 10 among adults in general.

    http://www.npr.org/2012/10/23/163414069/americas-facebook-generation-is-reading-strong

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  9. Depression-Era Evil: Gothic Horror In A Haunted Land : NPR

    The Night of the Hunter is a much-loved film, but author Julia Keller says the book it is based on is even better —€” a forgotten masterpiece. Do you have a favorite book that became a movie? Tell us in the comments.

    http://www.npr.org/2013/01/01/161408688/depression-era-evil-gothic-horror-in-a-haunted-land

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  10. Bradbury’s Tale: A ‘Wicked’ Read, A Haunted Book : NPR

    It wasn’t just the creepy carnival that drew Seth Grahame-Smith to Something Wicked This Way Comes. It was also the book’s frank portrayal of parents who don’t behave like grown-ups. Do you remember when you realized your parents weren’t perfect? Tell us about it in the comments.

    http://www.npr.org/2012/04/26/150727050/something-wicked-a-haunting-must-read

    —Huffduffed by adactio

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