Tagged with “future” (292)

  1. Kevin Kelly: The Next 30 Digital Years - The Long Now

    IN KEVIN KELLY’S VIEW, a dozen “inevitable” trends will drive the next 30 years of digital progress. Countless artificial smartnesses, for example, will be added to everything, all quite different from human intelligence and from each other. We will tap into them like we do into electricity to become cyber-centaurs — co-dependent humans and AIs. All of us will need to perpetually upgrade just to stay in the game.

    Every possible surface that can become a display will become a display, and will study its watchers. Everything we encounter, “if it cannot interact, it is broken.” Virtual and augmented reality (VR and AR) will become the next platform after smartphones, conveying a profound sense of experience (and shared experience), transforming education (“it burns different circuits in your brain”), and making us intimately trackable. Everything will be tracked, monitored, sensored, and imaged, and people will go along with it because “vanity trumps privacy,”as already proved on Facebook. “Wherever attention flows, money will follow.”

    Access replaces ownership for suppliers as well as consumers. Uber owns no cars; AirBnB owns no real estate. On-demand rules. Sharing rules. Unbundling rules. Makers multiply. “In thirty years the city will look like it does now because we will have rearranged the flows, not the atoms. We will have a different idea of what a city is, and who we are, and how we relate to other people.”

    In the Q&A, Kelly was asked what worried him. “Cyberwar,” he said. “We have no rules. Is it okay to take out an adversary’s banking system? Disasters may have to occur before we get rules. We’re at the point that any other civilization in the galaxy would have a world government. I have no idea how to do that.”

    Kelly concluded: “We are at the beginning of the beginning — the first hour of day one. There have never been more opportunities. The greatest products of the next 25 years have not been invented yet.

    “You‘re not late.“

    —Stewart Brand

    http://longnow.org/seminars/02016/jul/14/next-30-digital-years/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. Kevin Kelly: How technology evolves | TED Talk | TED.com

    Tech enthusiast Kevin Kelly asks "What does technology want?" and discovers that its movement toward ubiquity and complexity is much like the evolution of life.

    https://www.ted.com/talks/kevin_kelly_on_how_technology_evolves?language=en

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. Nuclear fusion: A machine to save the world

    They said it couldn’t be done: Nuclear fusion. We visit scientists building a clean power plant that’s hotter than the sun — but can they ever deliver? Then: the strange world of cold fusion, the people who hate it and the billionaires betting on it.

    http://cms.marketplace.org/2016/05/05/sustainability/actuality-marketplace-and-quartz/machine-save-world

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  4. 99% Invisible 217 - Home On Lagrange

    In 1968, an Italian industrialist and a Scottish scientist started a club to address what they considered to be humankind’s greatest problems—issues like pollution, resource scarcity, and overpopulation. Meeting in Rome, Italy, the group came to be known as the Club of Rome and it grew to include politicians, scientists, economists and business leaders from around the world. Together with a group of MIT researchers doing computer modeling, The Club of Rome concluded that sometime in the 21st century, earth would reach its carrying capacity—that resources would not keep up with population—and there would be a massive collapse of global society. In 1972, the Club of Rome published a book outlining their findings called The Limits to Growth. The book became a bestseller and was translated into more than two dozen languages. It had its critics and detractors, but overall The Limits to Growth was incredibly influential, shaping environmental politics and pop culture for years to come. There was a growing sense that limits would need to be put in place in order to regulate populations and economic growth. But in the midst of the debate, a physicist named Gerard (Gerry) O’Neill suggested a solution—one that would ask us to look beyond planet earth and into outer space.

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    Original video: https://soundcloud.com/roman-mars/217-home-on-lagrange
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  5. Planet Money, Episode 625: The Last Job

    There are some very smart people out there arguing that machines and computers are stealing our jobs. And that when these jobs go away, they won’t be replaced. They think that in the future, there will be fewer and fewer jobs.

    In the short-term, that’s a big problem, but in the long-term, it could be great news. If robots are doing all the work, people can just relax, right?

    What happens when the jobs go away? No one knows. So, in collaboration with The Truth, we made something up. Our show today is a work of fiction.

    http://www.npr.org/sections/money/2015/05/20/408292388/episode-625-the-last-job

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  6. The Economist asks: Can the open web survive?

    Sir Tim Berners Lee founded the web in 1989, and is now the head of its standards agency, the W3C. He joins deputy editor Tom Standage in The Economist studio to discuss the future of his creation.

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    Original video: https://soundcloud.com/theeconomist/the-economist-asks-can-the-open-web-survive
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. The human side of computing - Future Tense - ABC Radio National (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

    On how people can improve their decision-making skills by thinking a little bit more like computers; how young children can learn computer programming with wooden toy blocks; and how visually-impaired people can make better use of digital technology.

    Cognitive Scientist, Tom Griffiths, talks about computer algorithms and his theory that human beings could improve their decision-making skills, and the quality of their lives, by thinking a little bit more like a machine.

    Toy-developer, Filippo Yacob, tells us about the wooden play-set cum game he’s developed to teach very young children the basics of computer programming.

    And Vision Australia’s Senior Adaptive Technology Consultant, David Woodbridge, shares his experiences as a visually-impaired user of technology.

    http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/futuretense/the-human-side-of-computing/7421568

    —Huffduffed by theJBJshow

  8. Digital vs Human - Future Tense - ABC Radio National (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

    Three thinkers join us to share their thoughts on modern life and our relationship with technology – a futurist, a neuroscientist and an historian…

    Richard Watson, author of the newly-released book Digital vs. Human argues that the relationship between people and technology will define the history of the next 50 years.

    Neuroscientist Manfred Spitzer argues that digital technology is not only ineffective as an educational tool for the very young, but hinders their cognitive development.

    And historian Gary Cross questions whether our understanding of nostalgia has changed from being one of shared communal memory to one of ego-centricity – defined largely around the consumer technology of our youth.

    http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/futuretense/digital-vs-human/7379044

    —Huffduffed by theJBJshow

  9. Neil deGrasse Tyson and Douglas Coupland - Current Affairs Specials - ABC Radio National (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

    In this episode Mark Colvin speaks with eminent American astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson, who sheds some light on the universe and talks about the need to invest in science.

    In this program Mark also speaks with Canadian novelist and visual artist Douglas Coupland about his thoughts on the future.

    He says some of the future is already here and discusses what happens when it hits us.

    http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/currentaffairsspecials/neil-degrasse-tyson-and-douglas-coupland/7029320

    —Huffduffed by theJBJshow

  10. Future Tense: Digital vs Human

    Three thinkers join us to share their thoughts on modern life and our relationship with technology – a futurist, a neuroscientist and an historian…

    Richard Watson, author of the newly-released book Digital vs. Human argues that the relationship between people and technology will define the history of the next 50 years.

    Neuroscientist Manfred Spitzer argues that digital technology is not only ineffective as an educational tool for the very young, but hinders their cognitive development.

    And historian Gary Cross questions whether our understanding of nostalgia has changed from being one of shared communal memory to one of ego-centricity – defined largely around the consumer technology of our youth.

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

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