Tagged with “future” (309)

  1. Think Culture Is a Space Opera? Nah, It’s a Trojan Horse | WIRED

    In the latest ‘Geeks’ Guide to the Galaxy’ podcast, Simone Caroti discusses his critical survey of the Culture series by sci-fi author Iain Banks.

    https://www.wired.com/2016/06/geeks-guide-iain-banks/

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  2. 03 | Fast, smart and connected: All technology has a history (and a country) - Boyer Lectures - ABC Radio National (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

    Professor Genevieve Bell reveals how new technologies change life, but rarely in the ways we anticipate. How might the origin stories of the typewriter, the robot and electricity equip us to invent the future?

    http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/boyerlectures/genevieve-bell-fast-smart-and-connected-technology-has-a-history/9011390

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  3. 02 | Fast, smart and connected: Dealing lightning with both hands - Boyer Lectures - ABC Radio National (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

    Professor Genevieve Bell looks at how personal computers and the internet have reshaped our lives, and the possibilities we’ve imagined for ourselves and each other.

    http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/boyerlectures/genevieve-bell-fast-smart-and-connected-dealing-lightning/9011388

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  4. 01 | Fast, smart and connected: Where it all began - Boyer Lectures - ABC Radio National (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

    Professor Genevieve Bell explains why she’s returned home after decades in Silicon Valley, and explores Australia’s role in building our current digital world.

    http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/boyerlectures/genevieve-bell-fast-smart-and-connected-where-it-all-began/9011340

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  5. Future Self : Invisibilia : NPR

    We all have a future self, a version of us that is better, more successful. It can inspire us to achieve our dreams, or mock us for everything we have failed to become.

    What do you want to be when you grow up? This is a question we ask children, and adults. In American culture the concept of the future self is critical, required. It drives us to improve, become a richer, more successful, happier version of who we are now. It keeps us from getting blinkered by the world we grew up in, allowing us to see into other potential worlds, new and different concepts, infinite other selves. But the future self can also torture us, mocking us for who we have failed to become. We travel to North Port, Florida, where the principal of a high school did something extreme and unusual to help his students strive for grander future selves - a noble American experiment that went horribly wrong.

    http://www.npr.org/programs/invisibilia/533660783/future-self

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  6. Apocalypse, Now - On The Media - WNYC

    Science fiction has always been an outlet for our greatest anxieties. This week, we delve into how the genre is exploring the reality of climate change. Plus: new words to describe the indescribable.

    1. Jeff VanderMeer @jeffvandermeer, author of the Southern Reach Trilogy and Borne, on writing about the relationships between people and nature.

    2. Claire Vaye Watkins @clairevaye talks about Gold Fame Citrus, her work of speculative fiction in which an enormous sand dune threatens to engulf the southwest.

    3. Kim Stanley Robinson discusses his latest work, New York 2140. The seas have risen 50 feet and lower Manhattan is submerged. And yet, there’s hope.

    4. British writer Robert Macfarlane @RobGMacfarlane on new language for our changing world.

    Throughout the show: listeners offer their own new vocabulary for the Anthropocene era. Many thanks to everyone who left us voice memos!

    http://www.wnyc.org/story/on-the-media-2017-07-07/

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  7. To The Best Of Our Knowledge: Time Travel

    Time plays such a big part in our lives, it’s no wonder we’re fascinated by the idea of escaping it. And what better way to escape it that to travel back into the past or forward into the future? This hour, we explore our obsession with time travel. Why is such a recurring them in movies and TV shows? And what can time travel teach us about ourselves?

    http://www.ttbook.org/book/time-travel

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  8. James Gleick: Time Travel - The Long Now

    Time travel is time research

    Gleick began with H.G. Wells’s 1895 book The Time Machine, which created the idea of time travel.

    It soon became a hugely popular genre that shows no sign of abating more than a century later.

    “Science fiction is a way of working out ideas,” Gleick said.

    Wells thought of himself as a futurist, and like many at the end of the 19th century he was riveted by the idea of progress, so his fictional traveler headed toward the far future.

    Other authors soon explored travel to the past and countless paradoxes ranging from squashed butterflies that change later elections to advising one’s younger self.

    Gleick invited audience members to query themselves: If you could travel in time, would you go to the future or to the past?

    When exactly, and where exactly?

    And why.

    And what is your second choice?

    (Try it, reader.)

    “We’re still trying to figure out what time is,” Gleick said.

    Time travel stories apparently help us.

    The inventor of the time machine in Wells’s book explains archly that time is merely a fourth dimension.

    Ten years later in 1905 Albert Einstein made that statement real.

    In 1941 Jorge Luis Borges wrote the celebrated short story, “The Garden of Forking Paths.”

    In 1955 physicist Hugh Everett introduced the quantum-based idea of forking universes, which itself has become a staple of science fiction.

    “Time,” Richard Feynman once joked, “is what happens when nothing else happens.”

    Gleick suggests, “Things change, and time is how we keep track.”

    Virginia Woolf wrote, “What more terrifying revelation can there be than that it is the present moment?

    That we survive the shock at all is only possible because the past shelters us on one side, the future on another.”

    To answer the last question of the evening, about how his views about time changed during the course of writing Time Travel, Gleick said:

    I thought I would conclude that the main thing to understand is: Enjoy the present.

    Don’t waste your brain cells agonizing about lost opportunities or worrying about what the future will bring.

    As I was working on the book I suddenly realized that that’s terrible advice.

    A potted plant lives in the now.

    The idea of the ‘long now’ embraces the past and the future and asks us to think about the whole stretch of time.

    That’s what I think time travel is good for.

    That’s what makes us human—the ability to live in the past and live in the future at the same time.

    —Stewart Brand

    http://longnow.org/seminars/02017/jun/05/time-travel/

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  9. The Future of the Future

    How does the accelerating pace of technology change the way we think about the future?

    It’s said that science fiction writers now spend more time telling stories about today than about tomorrow, because the potential of existing technology to change our world is so rich that there is no need to imagine the future - it’s already here. Does this mean the future is dead? Or that we are experiencing a profound shift in our understanding of what the future means to us, how it arrives, and what forces will shape it?

    Presenters Timandra Harkness and Leo Johnson explore how our evolving understanding of time and the potential of technological change are transforming the way we think about the future.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b08nqc4j

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  10. The Future of Emotional Machines - SXSW 2017

    Imagine a stuffed animal that alters its behavior in response to a child’s emotional state, a commercial that changes based on a customer’s facial expression, or a device that can actually create feelings as though you were experiencing them naturally. This is the next giant step in the relationship between humans and technology: emotionally aware computers and social robots that recognize, respond to, and even influence our emotions. Because emotion is such a core aspect of who we are, these technologies will eventually be able to respond to our needs before we’re even aware of them ourselves. But how will they change us and what will be the unintended consequences of emotional machines?

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    Original video: https://soundcloud.com/officialsxsw/the-future-of-emotional-machines-sxsw-2017?in=clampants/sets/sxsw
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Wed, 19 Apr 2017 12:31:08 GMT Available for 30 days after download

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