LukeBacon / tags / university

Tagged with “university” (3)

  1. The Big List of Class Discussion Strategies

    When I worked with student teachers on developing effective lesson plans, one thing I always asked them to revise was the phrase “We will discuss.”

    We will discuss the video.

    We will discuss the story.

    We will discuss our results.

    Every time I saw it in a lesson plan, I would add a note: “What format will you use? What questions will you ask? How will you ensure that all students participate?” I was pretty sure that We will discuss actually meant the teacher would do most of the talking; He would throw out a couple of questions like “So what did you think about the video?” or “What was the theme of the story?” and a few students would respond, resulting in something that looked like a discussion, but was ultimately just a conversation between the teacher and a handful of extroverted students; a classic case of Fisheye Teaching.

    The problem wasn’t them; in most of the classrooms where they’d sat as students, that’s exactly what a class discussion looked like. They didn’t know any other “formats.” I have only ever been familiar with a few myself. But when teachers began contacting me recently asking for a more comprehensive list, I knew it was time to do some serious research.

    So here they are: 15 formats for structuring a class discussion to make it more engaging, more organized, more equitable, and more academically challenging. If you’ve struggled to find effective ways to develop students’ speaking and listening skills, this is your lucky day.

    I’ve separated the strategies into three groups. The first batch contains the higher-prep strategies, formats that require teachers to do some planning or gathering of materials ahead of time. Next come the low-prep strategies, which can be used on the fly when you have a few extra minutes or just want your students to get more active. Note that these are not strict categories; it’s certainly possible to simplify or add more meat to any of these structures and still make them work. The last group is the ongoing strategies. These are smaller techniques that can be integrated with other instructional strategies and don’t really stand alone. For each strategy, you’ll find a list of other names it sometimes goes by, a description of its basic structure, and an explanation of variations that exist, if any. To watch each strategy in action, click on its name and a new window will open with a video that demonstrates it.

    Enjoy!

    —Huffduffed by LukeBacon

  2. Politics and Journalism: WHAT WAS THAT ALL ABOUT?

    In the aftermath of the 2013 federal election and the demise of the Labor government, there are serious issues to be discussed about the performance and calibre of the journalism, from the Parliamentary Press Gallery through to the tabloids and shock jocks. This public forum discussed three of the most contentious issues in both the politics and the journalism: gender, climate change and asylum-seekers.

    ## Speakers

    • Kerry-Anne Walsh, author of ‘The Stalking of Julia Gillard’
    • Professor Sharon Pickering, Director of the Border Crossing Observatory, Monash University
    • Professor Wendy Bacon, Australian Centre for Independent Journalism, UTS

    —Huffduffed by LukeBacon

  3. 2SER’s Razors Edge - Academic Continues Support For BDS

    The Peace and Conflict Studies Centre at Sydney University has vowed to continue its support for the international boycott of the Israeli government, despite more than a week of negative coverage in the Murdoch press.

    The Australian newspaper has run ten straight days of critical coverage of the centre and its Director, Associate Professor JAKE LYNCH.

    Lynch declined to assist an Israeli academic with an education exchange application, saying he supports the international BDS movement, which stands for boycotts, sanctions and divestment.

    Despite immense pressure Lynch says he won’t back down to bullying and is sticking with the campaign.

    He told 2SER’s Mark Robinson that international opinion is turning against Israel’s occupation of Palestinian land.

    —Huffduffed by LukeBacon