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Tagged with “tor” (22)

  1. Aaron Swartz: The Internet’s Own Boy - Truthdig

    This week on Truthdig Radio in association with KPFK: A new documentary shows the genius and tragedy of Aaron Swartz, Hobby Lobby v. Women, the race to replace Rep. Henry Waxman is on, and we look at the surprising locale of the most segregated schools in America.

    —Huffduffed by LukeBacon

  2. Victoria Street Squats Interview with Ian Milliss

    Iain McIntyre talks with Ian Milliss about his involvement with Sydney’s Victoria St squats. During the early 1970s this street in Kings Cross became the focus of a long running anti-development struggle that brought together long term residents, unionists and squatters in a campaign which reignited squatting across the city. The interview, originally broadcast on Community Radio 3CR, discusses the highs and lows of defying thugs, gangsters and the police in defence of a unique community. For more on Victoria St and the history of squatting in general visit www.australianmuseumofsquatting.org

    —Huffduffed by LukeBacon

  3. Digital archaeology and the temporary nature of technology - Future Tense - ABC Radio National (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

    As our fast paced digital world continues what does that mean for the way we think about preserving things like old webpages and obsolete media formats. Are there possible lessons from our digital past for our digital future? We explore the fragility of our electronic data and also the temporary nature of the technology we use to access it. We also join the excavation of a 1970s computer chip - called the 6502!

    Guests:
    Finn Brunton, Assistant Professor of Digital Environments at the University of Michigan’s School of Information.
    Jim Boulton, Curator of the ‘Digital Archaeology’ exhibition and Deputy Managing Director of Story Worldwide.
    Greg James, Digital archaeologist, part of the visual 6502 team and software engineer.
    Brewster Kahle, Digital Librarian and Founder of the Internet Archive.
    Paul Koerbin, Manager of web archiving at the National Library of Australia.

    Further Information:
    Finn Brunton’s profile (http://finnb.net/)

    Finn Brunton interview on ‘dead media’ (http://www.pcworld.idg.com.au/article/390536/_dead_media_never_really_die/)

    The Internet Archive (http://www.archive.org/)

    Pandora Archive (http://pandora.nla.gov.au/)

    Digital Archaeology Exhibition (http://www.storyworldwide.com/digital-archaeology/)

    Visual 6502 Project (http://visual6502.org/)

    Archaeology Magazine feature on digital archaeology (http://www.archaeology.org/1107/features/mos_technology_6502_computer_chip_cpu.html)

    http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/futuretense/digital-archaeology-and-the-temporary-nature-of-technology/3790090#comments

    —Huffduffed by LukeBacon

  4. Cracking Open Encryption Standards : NPR

    Recent revelations about the extent of NSA surveillance have put even the standards by which encryption systems are designed into question. Encryption experts Matthew Green, Phillip Zimmerman, and Martin Hellman discuss what makes a code secure and the limits of privacy in the modern age.

    http://www.npr.org/2013/10/04/229206779/cracking-open-encryption-standards

    —Huffduffed by LukeBacon

  5. A History of the World in Maps - Late Night Live - ABC Radio National (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

    Throughout history, maps have always been as much about their creators and their worldviews as about reproducing an accurate replica of the world. Early maps were also about the unknown and how to display the borders of the known world. Monsters in illustration were often used to represent what lay beyond the edge of the world, and cartographers competed to create the best and scariest monsters on their creations.

    Professor and BBC documentary presenter Jeremy Brotton has produced a study of the cultural values embodied in maps and collected them in a book called A History of the World in Twelve Maps.

    http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/latenightlive/a-history-of-the-world-in-maps/4491276

    —Huffduffed by LukeBacon

  6. The Value Of Ruins

    Between The Alexandrian War of 48 BCE and the Muslim conquest of 642 CE, the Library of Alexandria, containing a million scrolls and tens of thousands of individual works was completely destroyed, its contents scattered and lost. An appreciable percentage of all human knowledge to that point in history was erased. Yet in his novella “The Congress”, Jorge Luis Borges wrote that “every few centuries, it’s necessary to burn the Library of Alexandria”.

    In his session James will ask if, as we build ourselves new structures of knowledge and certainty, as we design our future, should we be concerned with the value of our ruins?

    http://2010.dconstruct.org/speakers/james-bridle

    With a background in both computing and traditional publishing James Bridle attempts to bridge the gaps between technology and literature. He runs Bookkake, a small independent publisher and writes about books and the publishing industry at booktwo.org. In 2009 he helped launch Enhanced Editions, the first e-reading application with integrated audiobooks.

    —Huffduffed by LukeBacon

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