LukeBacon / tags / education

Tagged with “education” (6)

  1. Sarah Jeong on The Internet of Garbage

    Women are disparately impacted by harassment on the Internet. Harassment can be framed as a civil rights problem, with legal solutions proposed and vitriol directed towards platforms for failing to protect female users. But, as Sarah Jeong — a lawyer and journalist who covered the Silk Road trial for Forbes — suggests, the Internet has figured out interesting ways to deal with other kinds of online speech — like spam and malware. And using this lens could inform the fight against online harassment.

    More on this event here: https://cyber.law.harvard.edu/node/99138/

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    Tagged with education

    —Huffduffed by LukeBacon

  2. The Big List of Class Discussion Strategies

    When I worked with student teachers on developing effective lesson plans, one thing I always asked them to revise was the phrase “We will discuss.”

    We will discuss the video.

    We will discuss the story.

    We will discuss our results.

    Every time I saw it in a lesson plan, I would add a note: “What format will you use? What questions will you ask? How will you ensure that all students participate?” I was pretty sure that We will discuss actually meant the teacher would do most of the talking; He would throw out a couple of questions like “So what did you think about the video?” or “What was the theme of the story?” and a few students would respond, resulting in something that looked like a discussion, but was ultimately just a conversation between the teacher and a handful of extroverted students; a classic case of Fisheye Teaching.

    The problem wasn’t them; in most of the classrooms where they’d sat as students, that’s exactly what a class discussion looked like. They didn’t know any other “formats.” I have only ever been familiar with a few myself. But when teachers began contacting me recently asking for a more comprehensive list, I knew it was time to do some serious research.

    So here they are: 15 formats for structuring a class discussion to make it more engaging, more organized, more equitable, and more academically challenging. If you’ve struggled to find effective ways to develop students’ speaking and listening skills, this is your lucky day.

    I’ve separated the strategies into three groups. The first batch contains the higher-prep strategies, formats that require teachers to do some planning or gathering of materials ahead of time. Next come the low-prep strategies, which can be used on the fly when you have a few extra minutes or just want your students to get more active. Note that these are not strict categories; it’s certainly possible to simplify or add more meat to any of these structures and still make them work. The last group is the ongoing strategies. These are smaller techniques that can be integrated with other instructional strategies and don’t really stand alone. For each strategy, you’ll find a list of other names it sometimes goes by, a description of its basic structure, and an explanation of variations that exist, if any. To watch each strategy in action, click on its name and a new window will open with a video that demonstrates it.

    Enjoy!

    —Huffduffed by LukeBacon

  3. Aaron Swartz: The Internet’s Own Boy - Truthdig

    This week on Truthdig Radio in association with KPFK: A new documentary shows the genius and tragedy of Aaron Swartz, Hobby Lobby v. Women, the race to replace Rep. Henry Waxman is on, and we look at the surprising locale of the most segregated schools in America.

    —Huffduffed by LukeBacon

  4. Home Loan Modification Crisis on the Morning Amp

    Homeowners are the latest casualties of the ongoing financial crisis and the government home loan modification program that was supposed to help them has not been successful. In this podcast from three students in NYC, they explore and explain the loan modification crisis through the experience of one home-owner, Marcia Jones who for the past three years has been trying to get a loan modification to save her home in Brooklyn.

    Assia Boundaoui, Chao Li and Din Clarke are graduate students in the Studio 20 Program at New York University’s Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute. This podcast is their first of a series of "explainer" podcasts.

    http://explainer.net/

    —Huffduffed by LukeBacon

  5. Edupunk: Open Source Education

    DIY teachers around the world are using open source course management systems, open access textbooks, and other open source tools to buck the chains and limitations of corporate education software. This panel of edupunks will rock the show by discussing the movement, its challenges, and its future.

    Dave Lester, Center for History & New Media

    Jim Groom, University of Mary Washington

    Gardner Campbell, Baylor University

    Stephen Downes, National Research Council Canada

    Barbara Ganley, Digital Explorations

    —Huffduffed by LukeBacon

  6. Search Engine #143: Last Episode

    In the series finale, Cory Doctorow joins us for a last look at the Internet.

    http://searchengine.tvo.org/blog/search-engine-blog/audio-podcast-143-last-episode

    —Huffduffed by LukeBacon