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KurtL / Kurt Labu

Daydreamer, hyper-learning consumer

There are three people in KurtL’s collective.

Huffduffed (594)

  1. Futility Closet 94: The Living Unknown Soldier

    A quarter million Frenchmen vanished in World War I, leaving their families no clue whether they were still alive. During these anxious years, a lone man appeared on a Lyon railway platform without memory, possessions, or identification. In this week’s episode of the Futility Closet podcast we’ll tell the strange story of Anthelme Mangin, whose enigmatic case attracted hundreds of desperate families.

    http://www.futilitycloset.com/2016/02/22/podcast-episode-94-the-living-unknown-soldier/

    —Huffduffed by KurtL

  2. TMBA327: For Better or For Worse

    Today’s episode is the second of a two part series in which Dan and Ian are speaking with the co-founder of Basecamp and creator of Ruby on Rails: David Heinemeier Hannson.

    This episode is all about business relationships. You’ll hear about the origins of David’s relationship with his business partner Jason Fried, as well as David’s many interesting thoughts on business partnerships and how they can evolve over time.

    http://www.tropicalmba.com/dhh2/

    —Huffduffed by KurtL

  3. A science fiction writer from the Soviet Union found the secret to time-travel | Public Radio International

    If you think about what life will be like in say, five to ten years, you can alter the course of history. That’s what Genrich Altshuller may have done.

    http://www.pri.org/stories/2016-03-10/science-fiction-writer-soviet-union-found-secret-time-travel

    —Huffduffed by KurtL

  4. BBC Discovery - Eels and Human Electricity

    Naomi Alderman presents an alternate history of electricity. This is not a story of power stations, motors and wires. It is a story of how the electric eel and its cousin the torpedo fish, led to the invention of the first battery; and how, in time, the shocking properties of these slippery creatures gave birth to modern neuroscience.Our fascination with electric fish and their ability to deliver an almighty shock - enough to kill a horse – goes back to ancient times. And when Alessandro Volta invented the first battery in 1800, the electric eel was a vital source of inspiration. In inventing the battery, Volta claimed to have disproved the idea of ‘animal electricity’ but 200 years later, scientists studying our brains revealed that it is thanks to the electricity in our nerve cells that we are able to move, think and feel. So, it seems, an idea that was pushed out of science and into fiction, when Mary Shelley invented Frankenstein, is now alive and well and delivering insight once again into what it means to be alive.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p03jkfs0

    —Huffduffed by KurtL

  5. They said it couldn’t be done: Teaching robots good taste

    "Actuality" visits Spotify, where algorithms tell 75 million users what to listen to. Then, Tim and Sabri talk with a world-touring musician and a critic to see if this trend will save the arts — or doom them.

    http://qz.com/642696/they-said-it-couldnt-be-done-teaching-robots-good-taste/

    —Huffduffed by KurtL

  6. How Modern Psychology Undermines Freedom and Responsibility: A Conversation with Theodore Dalrymple

    Frequent Law and Liberty contributor Theodore Dalrymple discusses with Richard Reinsch his latest book, Admirable Evasions: How Psychology Undermines Morality. Dalrymple, a former psychiatrist in the British prison system, diagnoses modern psychology’s tendency to enable its subjects or is it objects to engage in self-absorption not self-examination. The ultimate effect of various psychological schools, Dalrymple observes, is that of an acid eating away the responsibility and freedom of the human person. His solution: a return to literature, and with that, a return to the authenticity and realism of human action and its limitations.

    —Huffduffed by KurtL

  7. Under the Radar #6: How to Become a Programmer - Relay FM

    Our origin stories and tips for beginners to get started.

    https://www.relay.fm/radar/6

    —Huffduffed by KurtL

  8. A Home in Space

    European Space Agency astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti is back on Earth after 200 days in space. She tells the full story of the International Space Station, in orbit 400 km above our planet.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p03bvvqf

    —Huffduffed by KurtL

  9. INBOUND 2015 BoldTalks: Amber Case “Calm Tech: Designing for the Internet of Things”

    Amber Case is an entrepreneur and researcher helping Fortune 500 companies design, build, and think about connected devices. She is the former co-founder and CEO of Geoloqi, a location-based software company acquired by Esri in 2012. She spoke about the future of the interface for SXSW 2012’s keynote address, and her TED talk, “We are all cyborgs now”, has been viewed over a million times. Named one of National Geographic’s Emerging Explorers, she’s been listed among Inc Magazine’s 30 under 30 and featured among Fast Company’s Most Influential Women in Technology.

    Case is the author of An Illustrated Dictionary of Cyborg Anthropology and Designing Calm Technology from O’Reilly Books (Fall 2015). She is a passionate advocate of privacy and the future of data ownership, and is interested in furthering the ideas of Calm Technology, wearable computing, and the future of the interface. Her current work as Managing Director of Existence at Healthways involves predictive analysis and wellness. Amber lives and works in Portland, Oregon; you can follow her on Twitter @caseorganic and learn more at caseorganic.com. Part of our BoldTalks speaker series at INBOUND 2015.

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    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0WOMe6cg0yc
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/

    —Huffduffed by KurtL

  10. Digital Human: Doppelgangers

    The online world abounds with doppelgangers, cyber-twins, bots and mind-clones; in this Halloween episode of The Digital Human Aleks Krotoski explores the uncanny world of these digital doubles. On the most simple level social networks and the now seemingly permanent cult of the selfie means that finding our visual double has never been easier. And its the appeal of this that was the inspiration for Niamh Gearney’s website Twin Strangers where people register to hopefully track down their double. Niamh herself has found 3 doubles and she hopes to track down 7 having found that number in researching doppelganger myths. For artist Daniel Bejar sharing his name with a famous musician has turned the online world into a battlefield for identity an idea he’s exploring by changing his appearance to that of his more famous namesake and posting pictures to the web. While for Joanna McNeil she created her own cyber-twin; a bot to share answering her emails and messages. She hoped this would help her understand the ways in which emotion is conveyed online by delegating communication to an algorithm. Its how the digital world makes doppelgangers of us all that fascinates Sara M Watson; technology critic and affiliate of the Berkman centre for internet and society at Harvard. We catch glimpses of these shadowy digital doppelgangers in ads that don’t quite match who we think we are online or in recommendations make us feel uneasy. Its the attempts at personalisation of our digital experiences that she compares to the idea of the uncanny valley of robotics when something is so close to being human that it becomes repellent. Producers: Peter McManus and Elizabeth Ann Duffy.

    —Huffduffed by KurtL

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