Tagged with “x” (54)

  1. Mac Power Users #55: Workflows with Adam Lisagor - 5by5

    Mac Power Users #55: Workflows with Adam Lisagor - 5by5

    http://5by5.tv/mpu/55

    —Huffduffed by Karmatype

  2. Ethan Marcotte: Responsive Web Design Interview — The Way of Responsive Web Design | Design Interview

    Ethan Marcottee explains responsive web design. He also takes us through his own process to building a responsive site which includes applying media queries and designing for the mobile.

    http://www.dormroomtycoon.com/ethan-marcotte-responsive-web-design-interview-the-way-of-responsive-web-design-design-interview/

    —Huffduffed by Karmatype

  3. Emotional Design for the World of Objects

    Welcome to the world of atoms. Remember when the mantra was that bits were more important than atoms? That we could dispense with physical things because information was all that mattered? Well, that was nonsense then and it is nonsense now.

    The human body is part of the physical world. It savors touch and feeling, movement and action. How else to explain the popularity of physical devices, of games that require gestures, and full-body movement?

    Want to develop for this new world? There are new rules for interacting with the world, new rules for the developers of systems. But the new rules still follow the old principles. Let’s not throw away the old lessons of interaction. In fact, these become even more important than ever before. And yes, there are some new things to learn as well, new technologies to master, new words to learn.

    Today the need is for complex, rich, emotionally satisfying things. It is no longer just about function and service. Those are still important, but they are taken for granted. Today we must add convenience and comfort, fun and excitement, pleasure. We needed to develop applications that both delivered real value but also was high in emotional value, experience, and engagement.

    http://2011.dconstruct.org/conference/don-norman

    Dr. Don Norman is the author or co-author of fourteen books, with translations into sixteen languages, including: The Design of Everyday Things, Things That Make Us Smart, and The Invisible Computer. Business Week has called this the bible of the ‘post PC’ thinking. His latest book, Emotional Design: Why we love (or hate) everyday things marks the transition from usability to aesthetics, but with the emphasis on a well-rounded, cohesive product that looks good, works well, and gives pride to the owner. The well-rounded product, says Don, will enhance the heart as well as the mind, being a joy to behold, to use, and to own.

    —Huffduffed by Karmatype

  4. Beyond Usability: Mapping Emotion to Experience

    Addiction or devotion? The complexity of our relationships between connected experiences, devices and people is increasing. Stanley Kubrick once said a film “should be a progression of moods and feelings. The theme, what‛s behind the emotion, the meaning, all that comes later”.

    Design ethnographer Kelly Goto presents underlying emotional indicators that reveal surprising attachments to brands, products, services and devices. Gain insight on designing user experiences that map to people‛s real needs and desires.

    http://2011.dconstruct.org/conference/kelly-goto

    As an evangelist for ‘design ethnography’, Kelly Goto is dedicated to understanding how real people integrate products and services into their daily lives. Goto is Principal of gotomedia, LLC, a global leader in research-driven, people-friendly interface design for web, mobile and product solutions for clients including Seiko Epson Japan, Adobe, NetIQ, WebEx and CNET. Her book, Web Redesign 2.0: Workflow That Works, is a standard for user-centered design principles. Goto is also the editor of gotomobile.com, a leading online publication on mobile user experience and serves on the national board of the AIGA Center for Brand Experience.

    —Huffduffed by Karmatype

  5. Mobile design, friction and UX with Josh Clark

    In this podcast, we speak with Josh Clark, designer, UX guy and author of Tapworthy about the role of friction and complexity within the user experience.

    We discuss the distinctions and similarities between mobile and desktop experiences, how touch devices are now allowing us to cut through greater levels of complexity and how the role of friction relates to the concept of a minimal viable product.

    Really interesting podcast and huge thanks to Josh for his time. Make sure you check out the presentation from Josh that inspired the podcast and the awesome Future Friendly site.

    http://www.epicbagel.com/blog/view/mobile-design-friction-ux-josh-clark.html

    —Huffduffed by Karmatype

  6. HTML5 APIs Will Change the Web: And Your Designs

    HTML5. It’s more than paving the cowpaths. It’s more than markup. There’s a lot of stuff in the spec about databases and communication protocols and blahdiblah backend juju. Some of that stuff is pretty radical. And it will change how you design websites. Why? Because for the last twenty years, web designers have been creating inside of a certain set of constraints. We’ve been limited in what’s possible by the technology that runs the web. We became so used to those limits, we stopped thinking about them. They became invisible. They Just Are. Of course the web works this certain way. Of course a user clicks and waits, the page loads, like this… but guess what? That’s not what the web will look like in the future. The constrains have changed. Come hear a non-nerd explanation of the new possibilities created by HTML5’s APIs. Don’t just wait around to see how other people implement these technologies. Learn about HTML APIs yourself, so you can design for and create the web of the future.

    http://schedule.sxsw.com/2012/events/event_IAP11512

    —Huffduffed by Karmatype

  7. Faster Design Decisions with Style Tiles

    With responsive design designers need to rethink the process they go through to work with clients and developers to create successful visual designs. Rather than creating traditional comps, style tiles are a deliverable that help you to communicate with your client, establish a visual language and work iteratively with developers. In this presentation, Samantha will explain how to reinvent your process to leverage Style Tiles as a deliverable.

    Samantha Warren is an experienced designer, speaker, and writer who leverages a diverse background in artistic mediums to create compelling and functional web experiences. Focused on designing for content, she is passionate about using the web as a vehicle to tell compelling stories while creating accessible user-experiences. She has been published in .net Magazine and has presented at various industry events, including Design Day in Pittsburgh Pennsylvania and the South By Southwest Interactive Festival in Austin Texas.

    Currently Samantha is the Design Director at Phase2 Technology where she uses her past experience working with brands like National Geographic and Choice Hotels International to help non-profits, publications, and associations tell their stories online.

    In her personal time she talks about design and the web on her blog, BadAssIdeas.com and spends time with her cross-eyed cat, Grace.

    http://schedule.sxsw.com/2012/events/event_IAP10133

    —Huffduffed by Karmatype

  8. CSS for Grown Ups: Maturing Best Practices

    In the early days of CSS the web industry cut its teeth on blogs and small personal sites. Much of the methodology still considered best-practise today originated from the experiences of developers working alone, often on a single small style sheet, with few of the constraints that come from working with large distributed teams on large continually changing web projects.

    The mechanics of CSS are relatively simple. But creating large maintainable systems with it is still an unsolved problem. For larger sites, CSS is a difficult and complex component of the codebase to manage and maintain. It’s difficult to document patterns, and it’s difficult for developers unfamiliar with the code to contribute safely.

    How can we do better? What are the CSS best practises that are letting us down and that we must shake off? How can we take a more precise, structured, engineering-driven approach to writing CSS to keep it bug-free, performant, and most importantly, maintainable?

    http://schedule.sxsw.com/2012/events/event_IAP9410

    —Huffduffed by Karmatype

  9. Top Add-Ons That Should be Integrated to EE « Episodes « EE Podcast

    The EE Podcast is a web design and development podcast focusing on technical discussions, interviews and insights about ExpressionEngine, EllisLab and the EE community. Hosted by Lea Alcantara and Emily Lewis.

    http://ee-podcast.com/episodes/top-add-ons-that-should-be-integrated-to-ee

    —Huffduffed by Karmatype

  10. Closing Keynote: Beyond the Mobile Gold Rush

    The rise of smart devices like the iPhone and iPad has led to an application goldrush, with companies racing to stake their claim. In the early days we saw a few lucky pioneers strike gold, but like most gold rushes, the obvious targets were quickly depleted. Digital prospectors lured by the promise of gold are now arriving to find a very different market—one rife with competition and few obvious deposits to mine.

    Recent studies have shown that we tend to limit our usage to a few core applications and the bulk of apps never even get opened. So despite newspapers and magazines hailing the iPad as the saviour of the publishing industry, does it really make business sense to jump on the application bandwagon? If not, what are the alternatives?

    In this keynote, Andy Budd will look at the current state of the mobile web, how we got here and where we go next. He will explore the new opportunities that have opened up for the field of user experience design, but will caution that not every mobile experience needs to start with an app.

    http://www.iakonferenz.org/sessions/31

    —Huffduffed by Karmatype

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